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Magnetised Phot Etch

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  • Member since
    April, 2019
Magnetised Phot Etch
Posted by Mattyfish16 on Monday, April 29, 2019 3:43 PM

So is it my tweezers... or is it the actual photo etch.

 

either way it is driving me crazy, does anyone have any idea why my tweezers are magnetising my photoetch pieces or the other way around. Very frustrating when you are creating intricate pieces.

 

Any clues on what it is and how to cure?

 

thank you 

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: The Deep Woods
Posted by Tickmagnet on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 3:05 PM

Atmospheric conditions causing you to have static and the negative retro bi carbonate reaction produces inverted retro magnetesis which transfers from the phalanges to the tweezers in a positive inverted pattern, thereby causing magnetism. Huh?

Actually I have no idea what it might be hope you figure it out.

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 3:13 PM

Stainless steel PE?

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 3:28 PM

Lots of better-equipped hardware stores and home centers carry 'tool demagnetizers'...sometimes for as little as 3 or 4 bucks.

You can do much the same thing with any good magnet; I've got one of those old-fasioned flashlights with the magnet clamp built in, that does the job just fine. Rub the magnet lengthwise against the tool...you may have to experiment to find which direction...and it will pretty quickly 'cancel out' the charge the tool has picked up.

Greg

 George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by Mattyfish16 on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 3:47 PM
Think so.... it doesn't affect the brass PE
  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by Mattyfish16 on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 3:47 PM
I will try this... thank you
  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Tuesday, April 30, 2019 11:43 PM

Tickmagnet

Atmospheric conditions causing you to have static and the negative retro bi carbonate reaction produces inverted retro magnetesis which transfers from the phalanges to the tweezers in a positive inverted pattern, thereby causing magnetism. Huh?

Actually I have no idea what it might be hope you figure it out.

 

Big Smile

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, May 01, 2019 8:59 AM

Tickmagnet

Atmospheric conditions causing you to have static and the negative retro bi carbonate reaction produces inverted retro magnetesis which transfers from the phalanges to the tweezers in a positive inverted pattern, thereby causing magnetism. Huh?

Actually I have no idea what it might be hope you figure it out.

 

In fact, static may well be the problem.  In the winter, in dry air, static can build up to considerable strength.  PE is so light weight it is like picking up tiny bits of paper.  You might try a ground strap, a wire from a point on your body (wrist?) to a water pipe or some other ground. Most stainless steel is non magnetic, as is brass.

If your body picks up an electric charge, when you hold the tweezers they will be at the same potential as your body.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by Mattyfish16 on Wednesday, May 01, 2019 10:32 AM
I've ordered a demagnetizer.... let's give that a go. Royally frustrating to say the least. In not the most experienced with PE to be fair so having this issue is tedious
  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, May 01, 2019 10:39 AM

About the only way that magnetism would be a problem would be if the PE metal was ferrous, and that's pretty unlikely although it could be so.

 

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Wednesday, May 01, 2019 11:03 AM

Chrome plated steel or less expensive (read 'cheap') stainless steel tweezers may become magnetized.  Stainless steel is an alloy of iron, chromium, and nickle.  More of the latter materials raise the cost and give the material its corrosion resistance and lack of magnetism.

The brass material used in most photoetch is non-ferrous and non-magnetic.   Brass is an alloy of copper and tin (?).  Stainless steel phototoetch will have the same alloy material as noted (above) for the tweezers.

Your problem is more than likely static -- as noted in a previous post.   Static grounding straps in modeling may be overkill - but are used in the electronics industry.  A simpler solution may be to wipe your tools with an anti-static dryer sheet.

After your experiments with the tool demagnetizer, you may just choose to put it in the garage to magnetize/demagnetize your screwdrivers.

  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by Mattyfish16 on Monday, May 13, 2019 2:12 PM

EdGrune

Chrome plated steel or less expensive (read 'cheap') stainless steel tweezers may become magnetized.  Stainless steel is an alloy of iron, chromium, and nickle.  More of the latter materials raise the cost and give the material its corrosion resistance and lack of magnetism.

The brass material used in most photoetch is non-ferrous and non-magnetic.   Brass is an alloy of copper and tin (?).  Stainless steel phototoetch will have the same alloy material as noted (above) for the tweezers.

Your problem is more than likely static -- as noted in a previous post.   Static grounding straps in modeling may be overkill - but are used in the electronics industry.  A simpler solution may be to wipe your tools with an anti-static dryer sheet.

After your experiments with the tool demagnetizer, you may just choose to put it in the garage to magnetize/demagnetize your screwdrivers.

 

 

Cheers Ed

 

My fear about static may be true. The Brass PE does not ‘stick’ or magnetise. The Demagnetizer works and does its job however I’m still finding it at issue. The only other thing i can think of thats causing the static is the plastic sheet that covers the smaller parts.

 

Rather annoying, but i will try an anti-static cloth and see if that helps unless anyone has a home made remedy for this? I dont use PE that much, but have done a couple of F1 cars recently and enjoyed the bits and pieces... so would like to do more.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 7:19 AM

mattyFish16;

 Hi; What you have is what I like to call ( Statistical Electricical ) Static Electricity .Do you work in a carpeted area? Do you have a stereo with seperarate speakers nearby? and the list goes on . 

 If you must work on carpet , get a carpet protector at Office depot .The thing seems to help in this regard and your chair will roll or slide easier .If the chair is in contact with carpet of a synthetic nature this is going to be a bugaboo for a while .

      The other cause? Gasp ! The ballast from FlourescentLights that is to close . Once these are a couple of years old they seem to develop an aura of static . Distance and newer lights are your friends here . Remember , flourescent light is generated by a gas being excited by an electrical current !

  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by Mattyfish16 on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 8:04 AM

Hmm this could be a factor. My chair rolls on carpet, however if this is the case why does it only affect certain parts of the PE?

 

the lights are LED so shouldnt be an issue in this case, and the main bulb is the room bulb so further away. If its the floor / carpet then it makes sense... i would have thought this would cause all of it stick

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 9:02 AM

Mattyfish16

Hmm this could be a factor. My chair rolls on carpet, however if this is the case why does it only affect certain parts of the PE?

 

....

 

PE is very light, so it can be attracted to a charged object very easily.  I have noticed in dry weather how a piece of PE actually jumps towards my tweezers when I approach it to pick it up.  A humidifier might help.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2019
Posted by Mattyfish16 on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 9:14 AM

I work inside, in the house to be fair in my sapre bedroom so its not like im in a damp garage as such.

 

its baffling.....

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Wednesday, May 15, 2019 7:49 AM

MattyFish16;

 It doesn't really matter where you work in the house. You have lights,electrical wires in the walls etc. Yes, they are shielded. But, In the right atmospheric conditions this happens and you won't even notice it .

     As an older fellow. My hair grows real fine on the sides of the back of my neck .The hairs stand straight up when I am at the controls at the Rail Museum. Why? Well all that electricity has created a very static filled environment .Remember,model train rails are energized !

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, May 15, 2019 12:03 PM

I think we may be confusing static electricity with radio static here.  Even though they both use the term static, they are completely different things.  Electrical wires with AC current running through them do not generate static electricity.  So static electricity is only a function of friction unless you have actual static generators around- very arcane machines used now only in science classes. Radio static, that AC current wires can generate when hooked to certain machines, is completely different than radio static.

And to get much static electricity you need dry air, not humid.  A humidifier dampens dry air, reducing static electricity.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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