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What is the technique you most need to master?

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  • Member since
    July, 2013
  • From: Chicago area
What is the technique you most need to master?
Posted by modelmaker66 on Saturday, September 21, 2019 3:55 PM

What is the technique you most need to master? Mine is decaling and clear coating.

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Saturday, September 21, 2019 4:06 PM

I'm great at everything.

 

Seriously,weathering,never know how much.

  • Member since
    April, 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Saturday, September 21, 2019 11:37 PM

I'm always learning, trying new things so my mastery is limited.  I want to get better/use my double action airbrush.  I continue to find techniques that support my single action.  

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    November, 2003
  • From: Naples, FL
Posted by tempestjohnny on Sunday, September 22, 2019 7:22 AM
The one thing now I'm trying to get better at is metallics.

 

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Sunday, September 22, 2019 7:41 AM
Airbrushing a smooth gloss finish gives me fits every time

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Sunday, September 22, 2019 9:26 AM

Gloss finishes, current-style weathering, and ... FINISHING A MODEL!  I really gotta work on the last one.

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, September 22, 2019 9:37 AM

Real G
and ... FINISHING A MODEL! I really gotta work on the last one.

+1

I was doing pretty well until the past year or so.

 

-Greg

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, September 22, 2019 10:08 AM

Weathering, the techniques and possibilities are endless. Not sure I will ever master it because there are always new things to try. Different subjects include different materials to be modeled, and they often have their own unique problems. 

  • Member since
    May, 2004
  • From: Land of Lakes
Posted by cbaltrin on Sunday, September 22, 2019 10:47 AM

time management. I need to make the most of the limited Modeling time I have..

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, September 22, 2019 11:14 AM

I have never learned to stretch sprue to get a uniform thread.

BTW, for a real gloss finish, my mantra is, "put down a final wet coat thick enough that it is just about to run.  How do you know just before it runs? Experience and practice.  Good lighting is a must- you must see reflectance of your lamp in paint coat as you spray.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, September 22, 2019 11:23 AM

Don Stauffer

I have never learned to stretch sprue to get a uniform thread.

Don, that was true for me as well until I learned a neat trick.

When I soften the sprue over a candle, I wait until the plastic completely separates into two blobs. Then I mash the two pieces back together, and stretch.

  • Member since
    April, 2015
Posted by Mopar Madness on Sunday, September 22, 2019 1:03 PM

Scratchbuilding details.  Never seems to look right. 

Chad

God, Family, Models...

At the plate: 1/48 Airfix Ju87 B2 Stuka

On deck: 

In the hole: 

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Sunday, September 22, 2019 5:24 PM

I'm with you Steve , weathering can make or break a model , I've still got a long way to go .

 

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, September 23, 2019 12:02 AM

GMorrison

 

 
Don Stauffer

I have never learned to stretch sprue to get a uniform thread.

 

 

Don, that was true for me as well until I learned a neat trick.

 

When I soften the sprue over a candle, I wait until the plastic completely separates into two blobs. Then I mash the two pieces back together, and stretch.

 

Good tip, making note of it!

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Monday, September 23, 2019 7:03 AM

Thaks Don, I will work on that 

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    May, 2016
Posted by learmech on Monday, September 23, 2019 11:24 AM
All of them
  • Member since
    August, 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Monday, September 23, 2019 12:05 PM

After a long hiatus from building .  .  .  sometimes I have trouble getting the box open !!

Yeah, I know, practice, practice, practice.

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Monday, September 23, 2019 1:07 PM

learmech
All of them
 

Same here....the only one mastered is hitting file 13 from 10 feet away with a kit that has done me in.

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, September 30, 2019 3:31 PM

GMorrison
Don Stauffer

I have never learned to stretch sprue to get a uniform thread.

 

Don, that was true for me as well until I learned a neat trick.

When I soften the sprue over a candle, I wait until the plastic completely separates into two blobs. Then I mash the two pieces back together, and stretch.

One of the guys in our Delaware Valley club is a ship modeler, who builds WW I and WW II subjects.  He uses stretched sprue to make railings, and to rig his ships, and he shared a tip he uses to get sprue as fine as human hair.  He hangs a hex nut on one of the many little nubs on a piece of sprue, warms the sprue over a candle, and then lets the weight of the hex nut provide the pull to stretch the sprue.  It works pretty well.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    June, 2017
Posted by UnwaryPaladin on Wednesday, October 02, 2019 7:36 AM

So many things! At the top of the list are seams and fitting canopies when they don't quite fit. 

The seams I can usually get, as long as my patience is greater than the seam gap. 

Ill-fitting canopies are by far the most common ticket to the shelf of doom for me. 

Great tips on stretching sprue. I see gloss coat mentioned frequently, I've found brushing 4-5 light coats of Future works consistenly over acrylics. It also seems that the decals settle better if they are applied when the Future has not quite cured. Not tacky, but 12-24 hours after the last coat is applied. I use Micro Set and Micro Sol, so that may also help them settle in.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Boise ID area
Posted by modelcrazy on Wednesday, October 02, 2019 8:51 AM

Nothing, I do everything great. Confused

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, October 02, 2019 11:55 AM

modelcrazy

Nothing, I do everything great. Confused

 
Heh heh, you and Tojo both!  Kings of Modeling! Big Smile
 

Tojo72

I'm great at everything.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2018
  • From: The Deep Woods
Posted by Tickmagnet on Wednesday, October 02, 2019 1:25 PM

Trying to find a way to eliminate the gloss coat.

 

 

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, October 02, 2019 3:55 PM

Tickmagnet

Trying to find a way to eliminate the gloss coat. 

Can you expand on what you mean?  Do you mean, eliminate the gloss-coating step before decaling, for example, or, do you mean, your finishes end up glossy but you don't want them to?  Something else?

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: White Mountains, NH
Posted by jhande on Wednesday, October 02, 2019 7:08 PM

I haven't touched an airbrush in 40 years and the last one i used the most was a single action. So I'm thinking mastering the dual action airbrush is going to be my biggest problem, besides my old funky eye sight.

-- Jim --
"Put the pedal down & shake the ground!"

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, October 03, 2019 9:01 AM

the Baron

 

 
Tickmagnet

Trying to find a way to eliminate the gloss coat. 

 

 

Can you expand on what you mean?  Do you mean, eliminate the gloss-coating step before decaling, for example, or, do you mean, your finishes end up glossy but you don't want them to?  Something else?

 

I'm not sure what the OP meant, but I don't like to use glosscoat on older cars. It looks TOO wet.  It is fine for customs, and new factory stock, but I think a really wet coat looks funny on an older factory stock.  So I am also reluctant to use glosscoat on such a car, and work hard to get a shiny but not wet look.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    November, 2005
  • From: White Mountains, NH
Posted by jhande on Monday, October 07, 2019 12:37 PM

Don Stauffer

 I'm not sure what the OP meant, but I don't like to use glosscoat on older cars. It looks TOO wet.  It is fine for customs, and new factory stock, but I think a really wet coat looks funny on an older factory stock.  So I am also reluctant to use glosscoat on such a car, and work hard to get a shiny but not wet look.

Have you tried a Matte Clear Gloss Finish?

-- Jim --
"Put the pedal down & shake the ground!"

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by knox on Monday, October 07, 2019 10:33 PM

I still need to master all modeling techniques, and “patience”, to rule them all. 

  • Member since
    November, 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 8:27 AM

Don Stauffer

 

 
the Baron

 

 
Tickmagnet

Trying to find a way to eliminate the gloss coat.

I'm not sure what the OP meant, but I don't like to use glosscoat on older cars. It looks TOO wet.  It is fine for customs, and new factory stock, but I think a really wet coat looks funny on an older factory stock.  So I am also reluctant to use glosscoat on such a car, and work hard to get a shiny but not wet look.

Yes Yes Yes ! Everyone shoots for that custom wet look gloss but it isn't natural on classic cars. They had a certain look to the paint, MM enamel pretty well produces that look without clear coating and without buffing if it's thinned right and put down well. To come close to that look with acrylics there will either still be a haze or else too wet looking. It's not the same. I call it "the look". I've been working with acrylics trying to get off solvents for two years now and it's working well for much of my painting. But I just shot the Mercer yellow last week in enamel and realize there is no comparison at least for classic car bodies. Lacquer is good too but I've shot more enamels even in 1/1.

  • Member since
    November, 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Wednesday, October 09, 2019 8:53 AM

There are so many things to master, maybe I compromise too much. A good goal for me is to go the next step in each step but too at some point you have to call a model done. I've kind of always gone for the flavor of the real thing in the model vs every single mini detail. Now with aging eyes and hands it's a little more challenging. I've been painting and modeling for 60 years or so and still could master brush painting a little more for sure. And especially detail painting, actually I rather suck at it lol !

But other things could use some attention too. In the last year I've had four models cooking a slow burn, one done. But is it really done, because more details can still go into it ? I call it done, that is the 1939 Ford sedan and the only reason I say it's done is because it was the subject of a build off with another forum member in another forum. I had to kind of wrap things up for the sake of emails and pictures where he had been done for two or three weeks.

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