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Master G22 airbrush review

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  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Fullerton, Calif.
Master G22 airbrush review
Posted by Don Wheeler on Thursday, July 15, 2010 5:19 PM

I have added a review of the Master G22 airbrush to my website.

As always, your comments and suggestions are welcome.

Don

https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/home

A collection of airbrush tips and reviews

Now also an Amazon E-book and paperback of tips.

  • Member since
    May, 2005
  • From: Left forever
Posted by Bgrigg on Thursday, July 15, 2010 6:22 PM

Typical review for you, Don, which means well thought out and uses common sense about the use of an airbrush.

I've been tempted myself to try out one of the cheap airbrushes that you see advertised on the 'net. Certainly $26.50 is a bargain! Thanks for taking point for us, and reporting back. Wink

You've confirmed just about what I thought I could expect. A reasonable clone of an existing airbrush with minor engineering issues that, for the price, could be overlooked. It would be interesting to see what a long term test would provide, but given your assortment of airbrushes, a bit much to ask!

The Master airbrush could be a good choice for a novice interested in getting their start on an airbrush, the regular price point being just about half of the Patriot. Certainly you could get your feet wet, and if you decide that airbrushing isn't your "thing" $39 is a lot easier to swallow than $75!

Personally, and this opinion is formed without actually touching one of the Master airbrushes, I'll continue to recommend the Patriot for the extra money. Given my experience with Badger customer service, the additional $34 is almost money in the bank.

 

So long folks!

  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Fullerton, Calif.
Posted by Don Wheeler on Thursday, July 15, 2010 6:55 PM

Thanks Bill,

My concern is that they may decide that airbrushing isn't their thing because they bought something that is more complicated or hard to use than it has to be.  From your comment, I suspect I wasn't clear enough on how I feel about that.  I would point a beginner at the Paasche H set for $46 before the G22.

Thanks,

Don

https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/home

A collection of airbrush tips and reviews

Now also an Amazon E-book and paperback of tips.

  • Member since
    May, 2005
  • From: Left forever
Posted by Bgrigg on Thursday, July 15, 2010 8:14 PM

Oh no, you were clear, enough. It is I who was unclear.

As I said earlier, I'll continue to recommend the Badger 105 for the additional dough!

So long folks!

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Gateway city, US
Posted by keilau on Saturday, July 17, 2010 6:42 PM

Don Wheeler

I have added a review of the Master G22 airbrush to my website.

As always, your comments and suggestions are welcome.

Don

Finally, a review of the knock-offs from a modeler's perspective and the usual high standard of pictures and insightfulness. Thank you, Don.

I don't feel that you can call the plastic hose connector a "quick disconnect". Quick Disconnect Coupler can be had for less than $5 a pair and works wonderfully for owner of multiple airbrushes. It usually comes in the standard 1/8" thread and fits all the Iwata, H&S, Grex and the knock--offs. Special adapter is needed for use with Badger or Paasche.

The small nozzle (0.3 mm) and very lone needle taper may give the impression of an Iwata like design. But the needle is not interchangeable. It was said that Fengda (maker of the Master G22) purposedly made the needle diameter smaller than the Iwata to avoid copy right issues.

  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Fullerton, Calif.
Posted by Don Wheeler on Saturday, July 17, 2010 7:49 PM

Thank you for the kind words and the correction on the hose adapter, Keilau.  I made an assumption and it was wrong, and I will make the change.

It's interesting that the needle diameter was protected but nothing else, although I noticed that the cup diameter is slightly different as are a few other dimensions.

Would you have any ideas on how to clean the space between the back of the cup and the needle seal?  Just flushing with thinner still leaves some ink in there.  I had to remove the needle and wipe it several times before it came out clean.

Thanks,

Don

https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/home

A collection of airbrush tips and reviews

Now also an Amazon E-book and paperback of tips.

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Gateway city, US
Posted by keilau on Thursday, July 22, 2010 10:50 PM

Don Wheeler

Would you have any ideas on how to clean the space between the back of the cup and the needle seal?  Just flushing with thinner still leaves some ink in there.  I had to remove the needle and wipe it several times before it came out clean.

Don

For many days, I was not sure what do you mean by the "space between the back of the cup and the needle seal". I finally took my PowerCat 203 out and saw that there was a big recess underneath the back of the cup and I cannot see where the needle goes into..Good observation on your part.

The Iwata HP-CS and the Harder & Steenbeck does not have the recess. The back of the cup goes straightly down into the airbrush body to form a smooth wall. The needle disappears into a tiny hole on the wall that is easy to see.

The back of the cup in the Badger 105F is the same as the PowerCat. Yes it will be difficult to clean the recess area with a brush or something. So far, back flush seem to clean it adequately. But I have use the PowerCat and the Patriot with black ink only and dont know how well they may clean when I switch to real acrylic or enamel paints.

The Iwata and H&S do not have the problem and a regular spray flush do most of the job of cleaning well enough even with real paints. But I still back flush everytime when changing color.

These are the 4 gravity feed airbrushes that I have. I am wonder how other gravity feed may look.

On second thought, even with that recess, the PowerCat and Patriot should not be more difficult to clean than in any internal mix, bottom feed airbrush. What do you think?

  • Member since
    October, 2008
  • From: Fullerton, Calif.
Posted by Don Wheeler on Thursday, July 22, 2010 11:08 PM

Keilau,

I added a couple drawings to my review page on the G22 to illustrate what I'm talking about.  If you have another look, maybe that will make it clearer.  In the Patriot, the needle bearing is located right next to the cup, so there is little or no recess for paint to collect. 

Don

https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/home

A collection of airbrush tips and reviews

Now also an Amazon E-book and paperback of tips.

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Gateway city, US
Posted by keilau on Friday, July 23, 2010 8:07 AM

Don Wheeler

Keilau,

I added a couple drawings to my review page on the G22 to illustrate what I'm talking about.  If you have another look, maybe that will make it clearer.  In the Patriot, the needle bearing is located right next to the cup, so there is little or no recess for paint to collect. 

Don

Yet, we are talking about the same thing in the same area. The Patriot drawing you put up is like the Iwata and H&S. I will take my airbrushes apart sometime to take a closer look inside. I still stick with my description in my earlier post.

I hope that some others would take a look and describe what they see in their airbrushes.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
Posted by Armor_Aficionado on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 6:48 AM
Funny, Don, I read your review of the G22 and immediately noticed, that's MY airbrush! Except mine goes by the brand name "Sogolee." Another Chinese manufactured ripoff, maybe my the same manufacturer as makes the Master airbrush line. I'm actually looking to replace my Sogolee because it has a major problem: where the bottom horizontal piece just under the barrel of the airbrush meets the vertical pipe carrying the air supply, there's a weld there that isn't completely sealed. It was leaking air terribly, to the point you couldn't really spray anything thicker than water. I tried to fix it by soldering it, which plugged the leak in the weld, but also must have gotten some solder on the inside, because now it still has super low air pressure despite the leak being fixed! I think I need to stay away from the cheap airbrushes, but you can order a whole set of Master airbrushes online from Amazon (3 airbrushes, two dual-action (G22 and G25) and one single-action (E91), plus a compressor and hose) for $99.95, cheaper than ONE good Iwata, Tamiya, or Aztec brush. So do I just pay my money and take my chances, knowing they probably won't last long, or shell out the big bucks for one premium brand airbrush? Decisions, decisions...

  • Member since
    November, 2006
Posted by Bearcat57 on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 11:05 AM

Do you want to have three more airbrushes that will likely all offer inferior performance (you know - the sort that fail prematurely and you have to try to do your own weld repairs to) and probably make you absolutely HATE airbrushing and soon give it up altogether, or just one that offers excellent performance for many years and is a pleasure to use?

I know the route I’d choose.

  • Member since
    September, 2016
  • From: Albany, New York
Posted by ManCityFan on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 3:22 PM

Ditto  Thanks Don for another great review.  I had never really considered a cheap airbrush, and this review shows why.

I would rather spend the extra $$ on a brand name I can trust, that makes quality, and stands behind their product.    Your airbrush(es) are one of the most important tools that you should be able to use for many years.  There are several very good airbrushes for less than $100, and let's face it, some kits cost more than that. 

Dwayne or Dman or just D.  All comments are welcome on my builds. 

 

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