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UGH!!!!! Primer

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  • Member since
    April, 2013
  • From: Eleva, Wisconsin
UGH!!!!! Primer
Posted by Greatmaker on Tuesday, March 13, 2018 9:55 PM

Since I have started model building 6 years ago I have been in search of a decent airbrushable primer.  I have a basement full of cans of failed primers. I use model master acrylics. I have had zero luck with their primer and Tamiya is a good primer as long as you have a good respirator. Plus I’d really like more control than a rattlecan. I thought stynylrez was the answer but after meticulous surface prep. I had my MM paint literally wipe off  About the best primer I have found is homeshades from walmart.  It adheres like you wouldn’t believe but again smelly and rattlecan. In my frustration at having to re-prime 4 props and spinners, 19 bombs, 3 gun turrets and 3 tires all of course completely finished, I decided to decant the stuff and try to airbrush it on.  I painted right over the peeled stynylrez and mm acrylic. It bonded through those right to the plastic. Plus in 40 minutes of constant spraying my airbrush did not plug once. Guess I’ve found a use for all of my aztek airbushes. Question is what can I store the decanted primer in so that it won’t dry out? Any suggestion?

Thank you 

 

  • Member since
    December, 2013
  • From: Orlando Florida
Posted by route62 on Tuesday, March 13, 2018 10:11 PM

I have been down that road brother.  Tried everything under the sun.  Rattle can, airbrush primers, lacquers, acrylics etc.  In all the years I always go back to MM 2737 and humbrol #1.  The MM dries semi gloss and takes 2-5 days to fully cure but once cured it sands great and everything I have shot over it sticks.

Humbrol dries to the touch quick, 10-20 min and takes 24 hours to fully cure.  It dries flat and like MM 2737 it sticks tight, sands great and everything sticks to it.

Both go on thin and can be thinned with hardware store thinners.

The only issue I have with both primers is the quantity.  The MM comes in the 1/2oz size and the humbrol comes in those tiny tins.  For most builds like 1/48 scale aircraft I will go through a bottle or more of the MM or two tins of the humbrol.  Each runs around $3.  You can get other primers that will last 4-6 builds for the same money you spend on MM and Humbrol.

Finding primer that is tough, does not hide fine detail, and is not too expensive may be a unicorn.  If you find it, get a ton of it.

  • Member since
    April, 2013
  • From: Eleva, Wisconsin
Posted by Greatmaker on Tuesday, March 13, 2018 10:20 PM

Thanks for the info. When I found the Walmart primer. I bought 6 cans of the stuff. Currently it’s a $1.64 for 10 oz can. It is nasty smelling but I think less than Tamiya primer. It dries extremely fast and can be sanded. I’ve never had a paint peel with it. I didn’t realize that I had a bottle of Tamiyas surface primer. I’ve only used that for seam repair.  I never knew until tonight that it could be thinned and used in an airbrush as an overall primer

 

  • Member since
    February, 2012
Posted by Liegghio on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 12:35 AM

When I decant primer from an aerosol can I ony spray as much into the jar as I estimate I‘ll need. I leave the decanting straw on the nozzle so if I end up a little short I can add more to the airbrush cup. You can store extra for a little while in the paint jar but I find it thickens up quickly. Also, when opening a jar, do it carefully, the propellant may have still been sublimating, and pressurized the jar so you can get paint splooting out. Ask me how I know.

I used to use Floquil primer when it was in production. Lately I have tried Mr.    Surfacer primer and Alclad white. They a emboth a little pricey, but I do like the Alclad. It doesn’t smell too obnoxious, sticks well and it is easy to pour what you need from the narrow neck bottle into the airbrush.

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by modelmaker66 on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 3:26 AM

I use vallejo surface primer.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 8:49 AM

My go-to primer is Rustoleum brand primer in rattle can. It's wet and dry sandable too. Never had an issue with it as long as you spray 2 light coats. Dries smooth.

  • Member since
    December, 2017
Posted by drumsfield on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 8:55 AM

modelmaker66

I use vallejo surface primer.

 

I have been using vallejo primer but only because I still have half a bottle left from my first purchase. I will never use it again. It peels even after days of curing, regularly clogs my airbrush during use, and requires thorough airbrush cleaning after use or it will leave a rubbery mess that is a pain to clean out if left to dry.

I once posted a similiar question in this same forum and got a varity of responses. One of them was to try the Badger brand primer. I ordered it but the bottles arrived with the paint already cured inside from the freezing temperatures. So out that went.

Currently I'm using Tamiya laquer base primer in a bottle with Rustoleum Laquer thinner. It seems to hold to the plastic very well. The Rustoleum thinner is stronger than Tamiya or Mr Color laquer thinner so it may help etch into the plastic a little better (at least that's my theory) I've never had paint peal using this priming method. I let the Tamily paint cure for 24 hours. I highly recommend this method. The paint is nearly indestructable.

I'm also using Mr Color Surfacer which is also a great primer. 

As far as acrylics vs laquer (using a respirator) I don't think acrylics will ever be as durable as laquer.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:29 AM

BlackSheepTwoOneFour

My go-to primer is Rustoleum brand primer in rattle can. It's wet and dry sandable too. Never had an issue with it as long as you spray 2 light coats. Dries smooth.

 

Only problem with Rustoleum is that they make several types ( I think four different ones).  One is great, others have problems

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:38 AM

Gunze makes several different primers / surfacers.  I have been happy with "Mr. Surfacer" and "Mr. Primer / Surfacer".  They self-level nicely and have filling properties for minor scratches and imperfections.  They are available both in spray cans and bottles, which solves the decanting problem.  Sprue Brothers generally has a good selection of them in stock, otherwise they are hard to find.

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    April, 2013
  • From: Eleva, Wisconsin
Posted by Greatmaker on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 10:31 AM

Don Stauffer

 

 
BlackSheepTwoOneFour

My go-to primer is Rustoleum brand primer in rattle can. It's wet and dry sandable too. Never had an issue with it as long as you spray 2 light coats. Dries smooth.

 I probably have all four in the basement. They just didn't work for me along with Colorplace, Valspar and several Kryon's and numerous other of brands.  The gray Kryon worked Ok but it is really dark and it didn't work with pre-shading

 

 

Only problem with Rustoleum is that they make several types ( I think four different ones).  One is great, others have problems

 

 

 

  • Member since
    February, 2013
Posted by tomwatkins45 on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 10:50 AM

 I've been using the Alclad lacquer based primers for several years. It's the best I've found. It's ready to airbrush right out of the bottle, sprays beautifully an dries pretty quickly. I've had equally got results with both the white and light gray primers.

Tom

  • Member since
    February, 2006
  • From: Boston
Posted by Wilbur Wright on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 11:56 AM

I use Model Master Neutral Gray enamel from the 1/2 oz bottle airbrushed on as my primer when I feel I need a primer.

There is no need to overthink this.

 

I would also advise to stop using MM acrylics, which have widely talked about adhesion problems,  and start using Tamiya acrylics.

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Friday, March 16, 2018 11:52 PM

Wilbur Wright

I would also advise to stop using MM acrylics, which have widely talked about adhesion problems,  and start using Tamiya acrylics.

 

 

I use Model Master acrylics exclusively and never had issues with adhesions. You just got to figure out the correct paint / thinner ratio that works. Don't get me wrong, Tamiya acrylics are good (I have a stash myself) but they don't have that greatest of range of colors. 

Mission Model acrylics right now has been getting a lot of great reviews and just recently expanded their color line. 

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