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what am I doing wrong and how best to clean this up.

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  • Member since
    October 2021
  • From: Georgia
what am I doing wrong and how best to clean this up.
Posted by Master Blaster on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 11:05 AM

I thought I had carefully taped and made sure the edges were firmly pressed in place but I still had this much of a mess after airbrushing. I used US Art air brush colors on this. Believe they are acryclic paints. Also added a few drops of reducer/extender base they included with the colors.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/1XjVdKTJyRVuSzmu9

 

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Naples, FL
Posted by tempestjohnny on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 11:39 AM
By the looks of it you might have put the paint on to heavy. The trick is light coats to build up the paint. It might 3 or more but most times it will avoid your issue

 

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 12:26 PM

Thin your paint a bit.   Thinner paint will spray at lower air pressure.  At  higher pressure paint may be blown under a tape edge.   Also spray away from the tape edge, from tape onto plastic as opposed to plastic into tape.

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: NEVER USE PHOTO BUCKET - IT'S A THREAD WRECKER.
Posted by disastermaster on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 2:57 PM

Master Blaster

I thought I had carefully taped and made sure the edges were firmly pressed in place but .........

Including the above suggestions, here's an additional step.

After masking, shoot a layer of future over it and let it dry.

Then apply the paint.

When you pull the (low tack) tape off you should have a nice clean demarcation.

Been there and done that.........   many times.

https://i.imgur.com/Gcc59Dk.png

  • Member since
    October 2021
  • From: Georgia
Posted by Master Blaster on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 3:40 PM
shoot a layer of future???
  • Member since
    January 2006
  • From: Earth
Posted by DiscoStu on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 3:47 PM

Master Blaster
shoot a layer of future???
 

 

Future Floor polish.  Though I think now it's called Pledge Floor Gloss (Though I think there will be plenty of people to correct that if I'm off-base)

 

"Ahh the Luftwaffe. The Washington Generals of the History Channel" -Homer Simpson

  

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 4:28 PM

Count me in with those who say you put your paint on too heavy.  Go with light passes until you get opaque coverage.  Don't go beyond that and keep flooding paint onto it in coats...you're not painting with a spray can, so use the airbrush the way it was meant to be used...to give you thin, light coats of paint that don't run, sag, or bury even the finest of details.  There's no need to be putting clouds of paint into the air like what you might see in a lot of airbrushing instruction videos.  Those videos always make me cringe.  Your paint should be thinned to the point of running down the side of your mixing cup like 1% milk.  Shoot it at about 20PSI, and you won't need any extra steps to keep it from creeping under your tape.  If its creeping under your tape, its going on too thick and too wet.  Piling more and more layers of stuff onto the edge of the mask is only going to complicate the unmasking process later.  You can easily end up with flaking and chipping that way.  Remember, when painting scale models, less is more..."just enough" is enough.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 4:31 PM

And to answer the second part of your question, you will need to strip the whole thing and start over, I'm afraid.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 5:41 PM

GMorrison

And to answer the second part of your question, you will need to strip the whole thing and start over, I'm afraid.

Yup.  Stripping to bare plastic and starting over is the best way to clean up the mess.  The safest stripping method I have found so far is isopropyl alchohol and a cheap electric toothbrush.  It will strip every single drop of paint off your model and won't hurt the plastic.  It works its best if you're able to at least partially submerge the part being stripped in it, but it also works in situations where that isn't practical.  A Q-Tip just barely damp with isopropyl alchohol also makes a great alternative to scraping paint away from areas you want to apply glue to.  Its much easier, quicker, and doesn't accidentally gouge your plastic.  Lots of other good stripping methods out there, but DO NOT use oven cleaner (still popular for some inexplicable reason).  The chemicals in oven cleaner will react with the styrene, alter its molecular structure, and you'll end up with a piece of plastic that is now much more brittle than it was before.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    October 2021
  • From: Georgia
Posted by Master Blaster on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 7:52 AM

Eaglecash867

Count me in with those who say you put your paint on too heavy.  Go with light passes until you get opaque coverage.  Don't go beyond that and keep flooding paint onto it in coats...you're not painting with a spray can, so use the airbrush the way it was meant to be used...to give you thin, light coats of paint that don't run, sag, or bury even the finest of details. 

thanks for the reply - these light passes are we talking about doing them all in one session or allowing the paint to dry between them.  I have seen demonstrations of both ways.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 9:02 AM

You're going to want to do your light passes all in one session.  There's no need to allow drying time between them because they are going to be extremely thin.  The first pass with your second color should still show lots of the first color through it, the next pass a little less of the first color, the next pass a little less, and so on until you get opacity of your second color.  You can also scribble fine lines with your airbrush to give varying opacity, showing more or less of the base color, to give your model's paint work a worn look like you might see on a starship...or like what you might see on a military aircraft.  That will come with more and more experience, but in the mean time, put just enough paint on in light passes for the color to just reach opacity.  No need to go beyond that...no need to come back with multiple coats of the same color.

Here are a couple of examples of really fine paint masking, with nice sharp, clean edges.

F-16 canopy with a representation of the line MIL-S-8802 sealant around it (thin black stripe).  This was done with an Eduard rice paper masking set for that kit.  It included 2 sets of masks for the main canopy section that were just slightly different in size, so the masked areas were offset just a little to leave the simulated sealant stripe.

A representation of the sensor section mating collar on an AGM-65D in 1/72 scale (thin silver stripe with a bunch of glare from my camera flash coming off of it).  This was just careful placement of two strips of Tamiya vinyl tape, covering the rest of it with Tamiya rice paper masking sheet material, and airbrushing a tiny bit of Testors square bottle metallic silver paint.

Good masking is important, but putting the paint on nice and thin is the key that makes it all come together at the end.

Before you go to the trouble of stripping all the paint off your model though, use the other areas that just have base color on them to practice masking and painting different patterns with your second color.  Might as well make the best use of the messed up paint job before removing it all and starting over.  That way you'll be a lot more comfortable with your technique when you start again.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: NEVER USE PHOTO BUCKET - IT'S A THREAD WRECKER.
Posted by disastermaster on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 12:04 PM

Master Blaster
shoot a layer of future???
 

 
Yes, because in the future this will help.
                           http://www.sherv.net/cm/emo/funny/2/upside-down-banana-smiley-emoticon.gif

https://i.imgur.com/Gcc59Dk.png

  • Member since
    September 2021
Posted by DooeyPyle67 on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 6:49 PM

Eaglecash867

Lots of other good stripping methods out there, but DO NOT use oven cleaner (still popular for some inexplicable reason).  The chemicals in oven cleaner will react with the styrene, alter its molecular structure, and you'll end up with a piece of plastic that is now much more brittle than it was before.

 

Depends on the age of plastic. I've used Easy Off to strip paint with no issues of styrene getting brittle on me. I usually let it soak overnight in a covered tub, then rinse/scrub with a toothbrush with cold water.

True there are other methods...

Brake fluid - which I think is the worse method because brake fluid can crazeor soften plastic.

Simple Green - Non-toxic, no harmful fumes but takes too long. Some folks swear by it, others say it sucks. 

Testors Easy Lift-Off Paint and Decal Remover - effective but expensive. Comes in a 8oz. bottle. Runs around $20 or so.

 

Finally, the next method I have never tried but folks say it works...

Super Clean, aka: Castrol Super Clean - The "Purple stuff" Simply immerse part in a bucket/tub for a couple hours, remove and rinse/scrub with a toothbrush. WEAR GLOVES!!!

I usually wipe again with Isopropyl Alcohol after any paint stripping session.

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 7:19 PM

DooeyPyle67
Depends on the age of plastic. I've used Easy Off to strip paint with no issues of styrene getting brittle on me. I usually let it soak overnight in a covered tub, then rinse/scrub with a toothbrush with cold water.

Stripping with Isopropyl Alcohol takes about 20 minutes from start to finish.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Thursday, October 14, 2021 9:51 AM

Rather than future, I seal the edges of the tape with a coat of the underlying color.  That seals the edges of the tape so that paint cannot wick under the tape.  I have also used a clearcoat instead of future, but I believe sealing with the underlying color looks slightly better.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, October 14, 2021 9:53 AM

Thats my method as well.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: NEVER USE PHOTO BUCKET - IT'S A THREAD WRECKER.
Posted by disastermaster on Thursday, October 14, 2021 3:16 PM

rocketman2000

Rather than future, I seal the edges of the tape with a coat of the underlying color.  That seals the edges of the tape so that paint cannot wick under the tape. 

 

                     

             Never thought of that!

https://i.imgur.com/Gcc59Dk.png

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