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Spray Booths

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  • Member since
    April 2007
  • From: Columbus, Ohio
Spray Booths
Posted by Patton on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 5:32 PM
Has anyone here attempted to build their own spray booth? I've been thinking about doing this instead of paying $200.
I'm gonna make him an offer he can't refuse. -The Godfather OH.........IO!!!!!!! GO BUCKS!!!!!!!!! On the bench- Scratchbuild Flakturm VII (Flak Tower)
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 6:47 PM

Try a search for homemade spray booths on this forum.  Several guys on here have done it and I'm sure you'll find there threads interesting.

 

E

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Peoples Socialist Democratic Republic of Illinois
Posted by Triarius on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 10:26 PM

I've done it, twice. In fact, I wrote "A Spray Booth for All Seasons—and All Pocket Books" for FSM back in the NeoStyrene Epoch…

The key to building a spraybooth is simple: scrounge. Otherwise, the cost in time, effort, and materials  easily exceeds the cost of a decent commercial one. Of course, if you discount your time and effort, it goes the other way.

If you can't afford the cash, by all means build your own. Your lungs, liver, brain and kidneys will all thank you. So will those of the people you live with.

The other reason to build your own is that you get exactly what you want. Just make sure that it is all that you need! 

Ross Martinek A little strangeness, now and then, is a good thing… Wink

  • Member since
    May 2005
  • From: Left forever
Posted by Bgrigg on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 10:40 PM

I rolled my own. Free wood, paid for the hood, the plexi doors, some minor electrical for the plug and switch, and a light for inside. Kitchen hoods are only good for acrylics, and I've never had any problems. Works pretty good, but since I've never used a "Pro" booth I don't have a comparison:

I originally built it for outdoor use, before I weasled my way into the basement. It's BIG, this is a 1:32 Stuka:

 

Worked out better than the computer I built which runs too hot: 

 

So long folks!

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN
Posted by jmathewstn on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 8:12 AM

 

Bill, I think I see the problem with your computer... the power supply is all wrong. And I also think it's not really made to be on it's side like that. If you straighten it up, you can actually do some low-fat broiling on the top.

I built my own booth as well. I had a plywood-topped work bench right where I wanted the booth to be, so I just added a back with the fan and vent, then the two sides and a top. I anchored it to the table with L-brackets.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 9:47 AM
Bgrigg:  You are hearby informed that your post has been bookmarked and is in serious danger of being mimicked. 
  • Member since
    May 2005
  • From: Left forever
Posted by Bgrigg on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 11:38 AM
 jmathewstn wrote:

 

Bill, I think I see the problem with your computer... the power supply is all wrong. And I also think it's not really made to be on it's side like that. If you straighten it up, you can actually do some low-fat broiling on the top.

Jack

I thought something was amiss when the power rating of the PSU was listed in BTUs! Big Smile [:D]

So long folks!

  • Member since
    May 2005
  • From: Left forever
Posted by Bgrigg on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 11:46 AM

 Chimera wrote:
Bgrigg:  You are hearby informed that your post has been bookmarked and is in serious danger of being mimicked. 

Mimic away, that's the point of the pics! Be forewarned though, that the fan in kitchen hoods, while capable with dealing with grease and fat, are not designed to be used with the solvents inherent in enamels or lacquers. I probably shouldn't be using it with acrylics, but I'm willing to take that risk. I certainly don't condone others to do the same.

A simple flat top with a squirrel cage fan is strongly suggested. Better yet, mount the fan on the bottom and use a metal mesh and turn it into a downdraft. Which is, BTW, on my "To Do Eventually, When I'm Done The Honey Do List" list.

So long folks!

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Nashville, TN
Posted by jmathewstn on Wednesday, April 18, 2007 1:00 PM
 Bgrigg wrote:

 Chimera wrote:
Bgrigg:  You are hearby informed that your post has been bookmarked and is in serious danger of being mimicked. 

Mimic away, that's the point of the pics! Be forewarned though, that the fan in kitchen hoods, while capable with dealing with grease and fat, are not designed to be used with the solvents inherent in enamels or lacquers. I probably shouldn't be using it with acrylics, but I'm willing to take that risk. I certainly don't condone others to do the same.

A simple flat top with a squirrel cage fan is strongly suggested. Better yet, mount the fan on the bottom and use a metal mesh and turn it into a downdraft. Which is, BTW, on my "To Do Eventually, When I'm Done The Honey Do List" list.

In THAT case, if your Honey Do List evolves and changes the way mine does, it'll never get done!

 

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