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Compressor Suggestions?

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  • Member since
    July, 2011
  • From: Searcy, AR
Posted by icer22x on Tuesday, August 02, 2011 10:50 PM

Thanks for the suggestion. I will try to get used to thinning. I'm still very new to it. All I have to go off of is people saying "thin to the consistency of 2% milk". I've started tipping the paint cup until the paint can run quickly back down leaving a thin film. I usually get my best results doing it that way. lol I've been experimenting with IPA, denatured alcohol, and Windex. I read on some other forum (don't worry, I'm not cheating on you guys) where a guy made a mixture of 78% IPA to 22% water and added a few drops of diluted Windex to improve flow and reduce orange peel. I think I'll give this a try.

 

Keilau, When I use the airbrush at around 20 PSI it takes around 20-30 seconds for the compressor to kick in. It's a small tank... but for $40 it's awesome. And if it craps out I can buy a more expensive compressor and I already have a tank!

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Tuesday, August 02, 2011 11:47 PM

Marine Sniper

 keilau:

 When you airbrush, you will find the tanks turn on a lot more frequent.

 

Tanks turn on? That's quite a compressor. Sorry Keilau I couldn't resist. Big Smile

Well!!  Embarrassed 

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Wednesday, August 03, 2011 12:07 AM

icer22x

It's extremely quiet. If I leave the tank full, I hear the compressor turn on again in about 10 minutes.

Keilau, When I use the airbrush at around 20 PSI it takes around 20-30 seconds for the compressor to kick in. It's a small tank... but for $40 it's awesome. And if it craps out I can buy a more expensive compressor and I already have a tank!

Great to hear that it is quiet and holds pressure for up to 10 minutes. Both are very good. The next important factor is how hot it gets. If the cylinder head does not get hot to the touch, you may have gotten a very good compressor.

When I forced the Paasche DA400 to run continuously for 30 minutes, the compressor cylinder head got warm, but I can keep my hand on it without feeling burnt. A laser thermometer registered 104°F in a 80 degrees basement. In normal use, it hardly gets warm. Your compressor will run hotter because of the smaller compression volume, but should do fine in normal uses.

It is a little surprising that the 0.2mm nozzle of the Velocity will run only 20-30 seconds. Milairjunkie reported 55 second with his 0.2mm H&S. His Revell Master Class Compressor has almost the same spec as yours (tank size, on-off pressures).

I measured 65 seconds with my H&S and 51 seconds with the Badger Chrome, both with 0.2mm nozzle. But I have a larger tank and the compressor runs at higher pressures.

Now, practice, practice and practice with your airbrush. And build some models too. Have fun.

  • Member since
    July, 2011
  • From: Searcy, AR
Posted by icer22x on Thursday, August 04, 2011 8:00 AM

Well I think I might be returning my airbrush for a replacement. Here's the deal:

I'm hoping I this is just stupid user error for a newbie. But the first issue arose when I made a mixture of 91% IPA and distilled water (about a 3:1) and added some Windex. When I shoot this through, my airbrush squirts bubbles between the hold down ring and the main body... no matter how hard I tighten it. I'm afraid that there is a leak right there. The bubbles only happen with that solution though, it's weird... straight Windex doesn't produce bubbles.

Also, it seems like every batch of paint I put through the brush, I have to take it apart and clean the needle because it gets so gunked up. Is this normal? Is paint supposed to be getting on the needle behind the cup - around where the needle bearing is?

I mentioned this on the forum when I first got my brush, but the entire inside of the cylinder is coated with this brown/yellow grime. It was sent like that. I don't know how normal that is... but I can coat a cotton swab with IPA and rub the inside of the airbrush near the back and have the swab be covered in the stuff when I pull it out.

Maybe all this stuff actually is noob mistakes... but it feels like I got sent a used airbrush instead of a new one. :(

  • Member since
    July, 2011
Posted by kingsleytim on Thursday, August 04, 2011 11:06 AM

Just a quick not to a statement you mentioned earlier about an air leak sound coming from the compressor. In the manual it states that the compressor will.. I wonder if this is what you may be hearing.

Release the air pressure automatically when

the pressure reaches 87 PSI in the air tank.

 

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Thursday, August 04, 2011 1:38 PM

icer22x

Well I think I might be returning my airbrush for a replacement. Here's the deal:

Maybe all this stuff actually is noob mistakes... but it feels like I got sent a used airbrush instead of a new one. :(

When you took it apart to clean, it became a USED airbrush. Did it have the same problem when first received? Did you follow the instruction to the letter when disassemble and re-assemble the airbrush?

How did you thin the paint? It is not unusual to have tip dry problem when using acrylic paint. It gets worse with a small 0.2mm nozzle like the Velocity.

You may consider request exchanging for the Badger Krome instead? The Krome has a plated inside.  Here is some background of it.

  • Member since
    July, 2011
  • From: Searcy, AR
Posted by icer22x on Thursday, August 04, 2011 4:42 PM

I watched a nice tutorial online about my specific airbrush. I'm pretty sure I reassembled it properly. It didn't come with any instructions save for an exploded diagram of all the parts.

I've been experimenting with thinners. So far I like denatured alcohol. Windex is pretty good too, but I think it does funny things to the Tamiya paint. I'm not a huge fan of it right now. Maybe it'll grow on my.

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Thursday, August 04, 2011 5:30 PM

icer22x

I watched a nice tutorial online about my specific airbrush. I'm pretty sure I reassembled it properly. It didn't come with any instructions save for an exploded diagram of all the parts.

I've been experimenting with thinners. So far I like denatured alcohol. Windex is pretty good too, but I think it does funny things to the Tamiya paint. I'm not a huge fan of it right now. Maybe it'll grow on my.

Check out this Ashley Brayson video.

  • Member since
    July, 2011
  • From: Searcy, AR
Posted by icer22x on Monday, August 15, 2011 8:09 AM

I'm still here guys... lol

I'm just waiting on Tamiya paint to become available... I haven't been able to spray much without it. :( It seems everywhere is out of stock.

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Monday, August 15, 2011 9:48 AM

icer22x

I'm still here guys... lol

I'm just waiting on Tamiya paint to become available... I haven't been able to spray much without it. :( It seems everywhere is out of stock.

Does Sprue Borthers have the colors you need?

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Monday, August 15, 2011 9:12 PM

I just want to say a big "thank you" to all you modelers who have posted the great wealth of info on this thread!  My 10 year old compressor died today, and I needed to get a new one, so I consulted the forum.

The Sparmax TC-2000 sounded like it had all the features I wanted, so I drove two miles to the local Hobby Lobby, they had one, and I had a 40% off coupon!  Saved me $132 and this is a great compressor, as I have determined after a brief test run.

Thanks, all of you, for the guidance!

Chuck

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    August, 2011
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by GreenThumb on Monday, August 15, 2011 10:33 PM

Great news Chuck! I love my Badger Million-Air compressor as well.

Mike

 

 

  • Member since
    June, 2011
Posted by garylee on Monday, August 15, 2011 11:54 PM

$40 Harbor Freight compressor - $100 Iwata HP-CS - Black 7 and Green Heart are airbrushed on - ready for flat coat and final assembly - 'nuff said.

Gary

 

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Tuesday, August 16, 2011 6:58 AM

Cadet Chuck

The Sparmax TC-2000 sounded like it had all the features I wanted, so I drove two miles to the local Hobby Lobby, they had one, and I had a 40% off coupon! Saved me $132 and this is a great compressor, as I have determined after a brief test run.

Chuck

GreenThumb

Great news Chuck! I love my Badger Million-Air compressor as well.

garylee

$40 Harbor Freight compressor - $100 Iwata HP-CS - Black 7 and Green Heart are airbrushed on - ready for flat coat and final assembly - 'nuff said.

Gary

It is hard to argue with Gary when seeing the nice result he could accomplish with his gears.

The Badger Million-Air is "virtually silent" at 30 dB noise. So you can lower the noise by 55 dB with $660 more in spending on compressor.

You can save $160 going with the Silentaire Supersilent 20A which is the same compressor as the Badger Million-Air.

You need to be super noise tolerant to use the $40 Harbor Freight compressor. So the $200 Sparmax TC-2000 is a good middle ground which is quiet enough for indoor use in most family.  

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Tuesday, August 16, 2011 12:17 PM

GreenThumb

Great news Chuck! I love my Badger Million-Air compressor as well.

Mike, what happened to your Jun Air compressor?

  • Member since
    August, 2011
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by GreenThumb on Tuesday, August 16, 2011 3:12 PM

keilau

 GreenThumb:

Great news Chuck! I love my Badger Million-Air compressor as well.

 

Mike, what happened to your Jun Air compressor?

It's sitting in the garage collecting dust. Wink

Mike

 

 

  • Member since
    June, 2011
Posted by garylee on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 12:51 PM

I keep trying to tell you guys that the Harbor Freight compressor is NOT that bad for noise. I have mine in the basement and you have to get right to the top of the stairs before you can hear it at all. It can't be heard from the living room or bedrooms. The neighbor across the street has a central air conditioning compressor that's much louder than  my cheap little H.F. job. And it performs well, too. From dead empty it takes less than 3 and a half minutes to fill to 100 psi and if I'm not using it I can leave it sit for hours before it comes on again. If I'm using it I can spray for about half a minute before it kicks on, but it doesn't run long at all to refill, even when I'm cleaning the airbrush. About 45 seconmds to one minute refills the 3 gallon tank. But to each his own, right? If you want to spend $600 on a compressor that's your business. I just know that the $560 I saved bought me a whole boatload of really nice kits. Peace.

Gary

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 1:17 PM

garylee

I keep trying to tell you guys that the Harbor Freight compressor is NOT that bad for noise. I have mine in the basement and you have to get right to the top of the stairs before you can hear it at all. It can't be heard from the living room or bedrooms.

I am not sure that I want to leave my compressor in the basement and do airbrushing in the living room or bedroom. I perfer to keep the compressor within reach during modeling. 55-56 dB noise is all I can take when I model in the basement..

 It is just a personal choice.

  • Member since
    June, 2011
Posted by garylee on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 1:58 PM

keilau

I am not sure that I want to leave my compressor in the basement and do airbrushing in the living room or bedroom. I perfer to keep the compressor within reach during modeling. 55-56 dB noise is all I can take when I model in the basement..

 It is just a personal choice.

So, smart alec hampster, eh? I don't airbrush in the bedroom. In fact, here's where I build, and I always love to see what other guys are doing so if anyone else wants to share that would really cool.

And you're absolutley right, it's all a matter of personal choice. What works for me might be horrible for someone else. But to me the whole point of this forum is for us to share information and learn from each other to make ourselves better modelers and help keep our hobby going strong, so when there's a subject that I have some experience with I'll post what I know in the hopes that someone else will benefit from it. I know I've certainly learned boatloads from you guys already so I like to feel I'm giving a little something back.

Gary

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2011
Posted by kingsleytim on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 3:54 PM

I use a small compressor attached to a tank bought from Northern tools. Its exactlly like the harbor freight one and i agree. It runs quiet and is very cost effective and functions quite nicely. I am building a kit right now after a 15 year vacation from modeling and am moving along quite nicely with my vega 2000 and budget compressor :). And i airbrush upstairs in my "man cave" and i do not disturb anyone when the compressor kicks on to fill the tank.  Its about 56db at the most.

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 4:45 PM

kingsleytim

I use a small compressor attached to a tank bought from Northern tools. Its exactlly like the harbor freight one and i agree. It runs quiet and is very cost effective and functions quite nicely. I am building a kit right now after a 15 year vacation from modeling and am moving along quite nicely with my vega 2000 and budget compressor :). And i airbrush upstairs in my "man cave" and i do not disturb anyone when the compressor kicks on to fill the tank.  Its about 56db at the most.

This is what Gary Lee referred to. It is noisy. I would not be able to model next to it.

 

Northern Tools has several airbrush compressors that are reasonably quiet, such as this one which recently sold out:

 

You are lucky if you got one of this. There is a huge difference in noise level between the two. They were priced about the same.

The majority of modeler would have perfer a compressor at 55-58 dB noise level. To argue that a noisy compessor is fine just because he/she can tolerate it is ingenious. The whole point of this forum to help people to avoid making that kind of mistake.

  • Member since
    July, 2011
  • From: Searcy, AR
Posted by icer22x on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 6:40 PM

That Northern Tools compressor is GREAT. I bought one recently (as most of you know). It's SUPER quiet. Once they get back in stock, I highly recommend it.

  • Member since
    August, 2011
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by GreenThumb on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 6:50 PM

keilau

 

 kingsleytim:

 

I use a small compressor attached to a tank bought from Northern tools. Its exactlly like the harbor freight one and i agree. It runs quiet and is very cost effective and functions quite nicely. I am building a kit right now after a 15 year vacation from modeling and am moving along quite nicely with my vega 2000 and budget compressor :). And i airbrush upstairs in my "man cave" and i do not disturb anyone when the compressor kicks on to fill the tank.  Its about 56db at the most.

 

 

This is what Gary Lee referred to. It is noisy. I would not be able to model next to it.

http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/370x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_9245.jpg

 

Northern Tools has several airbrush compressors that are reasonably quiet, such as this one which recently sold out:

http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/123009_lg.gif

 

You are lucky if you got one of this. There is a huge difference in noise level between the two. They were priced about the same.

The majority of modeler would have perfer a compressor at 55-58 dB level. To argue that a noisy compessor is fine just because he/she can tolerate it is ingenious. The whole point of this forum to help people avoid making that kind of mistake.

Just put the compressor in another room or the garage and run a long air hose. I did that for years with a Craftsman 1-1/2 hp 12 gallon tank compressor. You lose very little pressure even with 60' of air hose.

Mike

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2011
Posted by kingsleytim on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 7:13 PM

I think i got the last one from northern tools :)

  • Member since
    August, 2011
Posted by Rchjr on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 9:31 PM

Hey there all,

I just received my compressor from Northern Tools on monday and it is super quiet. I am waiting for some parts on my airbrush before I can use it.

Rchjr

 

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Wednesday, August 17, 2011 9:55 PM

I still believe that the little quiet Northern Tools compressor with 3/4-gallon tank is a much better deal than the Habor Freight one with 3-gallons tank at the same price.

I tested one. The noise is no higher than a typical airbrush compressor from Iwata or Sparmax, but the pitch is slightly higher, just barely. It is not the supersilent type at $600, but you can talk comfortable without raising your voice while airbrushing.

The Northern Tools compressor cylinder head (the part with the vertical heatsink fins) gets as hot as those house brand sold at TCPGlobal. If you leave it running continuously for 30 minutes, it is about 45 degrees F above room temperature. It is quite acceptable since the compressor has auto-on-off and would never run continuously. In normal use, the head will barely get warm to the touch.

The auto switch turns on and off at 45 and 60 psi respectively. These are very good to allow good pressure margin for different paints in most airbrushing jobs, except not quite enough airflow and pressure for T-shirt airbrushing. The airflow was very steady with all of my airbrushes. As usual, with compressor at this price point, your milage may vary.

I did not realize so many of you got this compressor. Please, report back in 6 months and a year. If it still runs strong, you got a hell of a deal. Good luck with your new toy.

Disclaimer: I have no relationship nor know any individual at Northern Tools.

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Thursday, August 18, 2011 6:35 AM

GreenThumb

 keilau:

This is what Gary Lee referred to. It is noisy. I would not be able to model next to it.

 Northern Tools has several airbrush compressors that are reasonably quiet, such as this one which recently sold out:

 You are lucky if you got one of this. There is a huge difference in noise level between the two. They were priced about the same.

The majority of modeler would have perfer a compressor at 55-58 dB noise level. To argue that a noisy compessor is fine just because he/she can tolerate it is ingenious. The whole point of this forum to help people avoid making that kind of mistake.

Just put the compressor in another room or the garage and run a long air hose. I did that for years with a Craftsman 1-1/2 hp 12 gallon tank compressor. You lose very little pressure even with 60' of air hose.

We are talking about the cheap compressor solution here. The 60 feet air hose can easily double the $40 cost of the compressor. Besides, it is inconvenient to have to put away the long air hose each time after the modeling session. Few family will accept leaving the air hose stringing around the house all the time.

Most modeler cannot afford the Badger Million-Air compressor you recommended. But they would still perfer to have a compressor that is quiet enough to be in the workbench area and can hear the family when they call. There are many compressor which can fit this bill.

Again, it is a personal perference that how much noise you choose to live with while modeling.

  • Member since
    June, 2011
Posted by garylee on Thursday, August 18, 2011 6:47 AM

Does anyone know if Northern Tool will re-stock their compressor, or is it gone for good? I still like my H.F. compressor, but after hearing you guys rave about the one from N.T. I just might try it out.

Gary

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Reasoned on Thursday, August 18, 2011 11:25 AM

Reasoned

http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/small_image/160x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_9241.jpg

Quiet operation. Delivers 0 to 40 PSI constant pressure for a quality finish. Works with all airbrushes.

  • Auto shut off at 40 PSI, auto-on at 3 PSI
  • Adjustable pressure regulator with moisture trap
  • Direct hook-up with all airbrushes using universal 1/8"-28 NPS
  • Fitting with 1/4" NPT male adapter
  • Thermal overload protection with automatic reset
  • Rubber suction cup feet for stability
  • Built-in carrying handle for maximum portability

Includes 10 ft. coiled air line, Teflon tape, easy-to-read pressure gauge
1/8 HP, 115 volt, 2 amps, 1750 RPM
Overall dimensions: 9-3/4" L x 5-3/8'' W x 9-1/4'' H
Shipping Weight: 8.70 lbs.

 

 

Why mess with a tank if you don't need to? 

Science is the pursiut of knowledge, faith is the pursuit of wisdom.  Peace be with you.

On the Tarmac: 1/48 Revell P-38

In the Hanger: A bunch of kits

  • Member since
    April, 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Thursday, August 18, 2011 12:06 PM

Reasoned

 Reasoned:

http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/small_image/160x/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_9241.jpg

Quiet operation. Delivers 0 to 40 PSI constant pressure for a quality finish. Works with all airbrushes.

  • Auto shut off at 40 PSI, auto-on at 3 PSI
  • Adjustable pressure regulator with moisture trap
  • Direct hook-up with all airbrushes using universal 1/8"-28 NPS
  • Fitting with 1/4" NPT male adapter
  • Thermal overload protection with automatic reset
  • Rubber suction cup feet for stability
  • Built-in carrying handle for maximum portability

Includes 10 ft. coiled air line, Teflon tape, easy-to-read pressure gauge
1/8 HP, 115 volt, 2 amps, 1750 RPM
Overall dimensions: 9-3/4" L x 5-3/8'' W x 9-1/4'' H
Shipping Weight: 8.70 lbs.

 

 Why mess with a tank if you don't need to? 

3 simple reasons:

  1. $40 cheaper with the tank. Why pay more for less.
  2. More powerful motor and 20 psi higher in pressure margin. Auto at 45 & 60 psi.
  3. The tank cannot hurt.

Harbor Freight does have a better airbrush compressor at higher pressure that is equally quiet, closer to the Northern Tools spec. But it is $60 more than NT compressor and still without a tank.

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