SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Badger TC910: need some feedback help

13349 views
84 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July 2012
Badger TC910: need some feedback help
Posted by JackB on Friday, July 27, 2012 10:48 PM

Hello,

I just got my 1st compressor and airbrush set up. I purchased the Badger TC910 & an Iwata Revolution CR. I've just received these and the shipping box was damaged though the contents (mainly concerned about the compressor) seem to be in good shape thanks to Badger having inner lined their box with another layer of cardboard. Anyway I thought it would be a good idea to check with people here to see if my initial test of this set up is working properly.

I have the airbrush connected via Iwata air hose, I've used teflon tape at both ends. The compressor takes a few minutes to fill up then stops. I don't hear any leaks nor if I leave it alone for more than 10 minutes dose it come back on. So I am assuming no leaks. The pressure seems to be 35psi max out of the box. I noticed that when using the airbrush the gauge stays at that setting. On lower settings say 25-30psi when the air brush is on it drops about 1/2-1psi. And on even lower settings say 20-25psi this drops by as much as 2psi. Is this normal?

Any feedback from TC910 owners here would be appreciated. Thank you

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Friday, July 27, 2012 11:26 PM

Yep, that's pretty normal. You want to set an operating pressure (ie. pressure when air is flowing) rather than "static" pressure. ie. if you want your airbrush at 15psi, then set that while you hold the airbrush trigger open.

Just to note, your Revolution CR should be good down to about 12 PSI or less.

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 12:36 AM

Thanks Phil... only thing I did notice when I un-boxed the unit was that the red ring around the base of regulator dial was not secured at all, but I don't think it took a hit there. Just that it came that way and I had to turn it to attache it properly.

I could be wrong about the max pressure, it might have been around 40psi (static pressure) out of the box with the CR connected. btw is that static pressure dependent on which airbrush is conected? I think this compressor can go up to 57psi.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by Bick on Saturday, July 28, 2012 7:23 AM

Hi,

I have  the TC-910 and what you describe sounds fine. That red ring on the regulator isn't needed for use with the TC-910 - it's actually a ring nut for holding the regulator in a panel or whatever round hole in other mount applications. With my Revolution CR I can maintain about 30 PSI continuously but with a smaller nozzle higher pressures can be maintained. Maximum pressure at the regulator while spraying is very dependent on AB nozzle size even though the tank can go to 57PSI. Enjoy your new AB and compressor. I think you'll find they work great together.Yes

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 12:59 PM

Hi Bick,

So if I understand this correctly,  I will never see the gauge read 57psi with the CR air brush connected? only about 30-40psi. Not that I want it higher, just to know the gauge is working properly.

One other thing regarding gauge reading... at the end of my test, I turned the compressor off and kept the air brush going to empty the tank. I see the gauge sits at around 5psi and not zero. Is this normal too? I'm guessing there is still some pressure in there but dose not feed out.

Thanks for the help guys,

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 5:26 PM

I had some time today and ran the setup again. I'm getting steady 35psi max with the CR connected. I shouldn't have stated 30-40 above, it dose not fluctuate at max.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by Bick on Saturday, July 28, 2012 5:37 PM

Jack,

If you connect your AB (don't depress the trigger), turn on the compressor, let it run until it shuts itself off, then pull up and rotate the regulator knob clockwise (it will take quite a few turns) until the gauge shows no further increase in pressure it should show 50+ PSI. I just did the above with my TC-910 and got a max pressure reading about 55 PSI (near as I can read that gauge). Turn the regulator knob counterclockwise to reduce the pressure, depress the AB trigger and set the pressure for your liking You should be able to maintain 30PSI with your Revolution with no sweat - I haven't tried (or needed) higher so I can't tell if it will maintain 40PSI with the Revolution.

As far as the residual 5PSI, I wouldn't worry; if you check it a few hours from now it'll probably be at zero. Bleeding the tank to zero by using the AB takes a bit of time so I either (1) depress the valve on the bottom of the regulator and let it blow water or whatever and even then it seems like no air is left but the gauge shows a positive reading; or (2) I unscrew the drain valve on the bottom of the tank (I do this weekly anyway) and leave it open. Gauge will quickly show zero. If you forget to close it, it'll be obvious next time you turn your compressor on - you get a hissing sound and pressure won't build up in the tank. Only takes a couple of seconds to remember to close the drain valve.

Don Wheeler has a nice review of the TC-910 on his site, including some PSI tests he did. Check his review out here: sites.google.com/.../badger-tc910-compressor-review

Hope this is useful for you. I like my TC-910

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 5:56 PM

Bick,

Are you hooked up with an Iwata Revolution CR brush? and not sure if it matters but I have 10' iwata braided hose connected (BT 010).

atm I have the tank full AB off, I've turned the dial clockwise as much as it will let me and getting 36psi reading. No more.

I will try to deplete the tank later (thanks for instructions) and see what I get.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 6:50 PM

Don't know why but even after bleeding the tank and unscrewing the drain plug and letting it sit for 10 minutes, the gauge was still at 5psi. I thought I would check if the gauge was mounted on level... as I barely touched it the needle dropped to zero.

Now I've filled and emptied it 2x to test and it reads as high as 39psi and only needed to use bleed valve to drain to zero.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by Bick on Saturday, July 28, 2012 6:52 PM

Jack,

Yes, ATM i've got an Iwata Revolution CR brush attached to my TC-910. I have an H&S poly hose of 7.5 ft but that shouldn't make any difference. With a closed system you should be showing over 50PSI so sounds to me your gauge might be sticking (or faulty) or the regulator isn't up to spec. Can you adjust pressure up and down easily with the regulator knob? Tap the gauge with a plastic handled screwdriver and see if it changes (i.e.could be just a sticky needle). I'd be surprised if the compressor didn't put out the pressure that Badger states, also,  your on/off pressure switch seems to be working fine. Unfortunately, the gauges supplied with most smaller AB compressors are not very good ones (a precision gauge costs as much as the compressor) but 36PSI vs 50+PSI with a small compressor is a big error. Let me know if its just a sticky gauge needle because everything else sounds good if you can maintain 30PSI with you Revolution. Just sounds like the gauge to me.

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by Bick on Saturday, July 28, 2012 7:01 PM

Jack,

Re your post 2 min before mine. Sounds like a gauge problem. I really think the compressor is working as it should but the gauge is not. I'm sure Badger will help by either replacing the gauge or the compressor. Alternatively, you could buy a 0-60PS class II gauge for a few bucks and do it yourself - replacing the gauge is easy. Or, you could return it and ask for a replacement.

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 7:10 PM

Thanks Bick,

If the dial is set to max, it takes a few turns to dial down the pressure below 38psi. Then after that with AB on I am able to control and tune it as I like (for what I can tell as I am new to this). But I can stop the needle where I want too when AB is on. On release it goes up about 1-2psi.

I'm thinking I should have the unit replaced just incase. That is where it sustained damage in shipping. Was a hole in the box about fist size. lol

btw. I forgot to mention that I did read Don's review and a couple of other ones online.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 7:27 PM

Will try and send it back as damaged in shipping. It dose seem to me like it's the gauge. Glad I checked here.

Thank you for your time. Will post back on any progress.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Saturday, July 28, 2012 8:54 PM

JackB

Will try and send it back as damaged in shipping. It dose seem to me like it's the gauge. Glad I checked here.

Thank you for your time. Will post back on any progress.

When you receive your new compressor and if everything check out fine, you may consider replacing the pressure gauge with one of larger dail. I got mine at Ebay for less than $10.

You should also test your new compressor by running it continuously for about 20 minutes or so. Push down the CR trigger to force the compressor motor to run constantly. The compressor head temperature should stablize and stay at no more than 40-50 degrees F above room temperature. If the compressor is working normally, this test will not hurt it. If not, it is better to know that you may get a defective unit when it is still under warranty. In reality, the compressor should run much cooler because the motor is on and off intermittently.

Good luck and let us know how the TC-910 works out for you.

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, July 28, 2012 10:32 PM

Hi  keilau,

Thanks for the info. That is a nice looking gauge.... I like the fact it only goes to 60 which makes it easier to read and set in between increments. Will consider updating in the near future but at point of just getting a brand new compressor I would have hoped the stock one worked. Well maybe I'm jumping the gun here... hard for me to say, maybe there is damage somewhere else I'm not seeing. I can only notice there are no leaks because when the compressor is set to on and left alone for 20-30min the compressor dose not kick in.

Will keep you posted.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Saturday, July 28, 2012 11:18 PM

JackB

Hi  keilau,

Thanks for the info. That is a nice looking gauge.... I like the fact it only goes to 60 which makes it easier to read and set in between increments. Will consider updating in the near future but at point of just getting a brand new compressor I would have hoped the stock one worked. Well maybe I'm jumping the gun here... hard for me to say, maybe there is damage somewhere else I'm not seeing. I can only notice there are no leaks because when the compressor is set to on and left alone for 20-30min the compressor dose not kick in.

Will keep you posted.

Can you elaborate on what you mean by this?  "when the compressor is set to on and left alone for 20-30min the compressor dose not kick in." Yes, if you are not using any air, the motor should not kick in. If so, it is good.

Small oilless airbrush compressor are sensitive to heat. If it gets hot during operation, it may not last too long. A well made compressor will run very quiet and very cool.

You may find this old post on TC-910 interesting.

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Sunday, July 29, 2012 2:27 PM

keilau,

sorry for the confusion, only meant that the compressor dose not need to re fill the tank. And I did not notice any heat issues at all. motor was just slightly warm to the touch at all times.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Tuesday, July 31, 2012 5:07 PM

JackB

keilau,

sorry for the confusion, only meant that the compressor dose not need to re fill the tank. And I did not notice any heat issues at all. motor was just slightly warm to the touch at all times.

You get an extremely good unit if it runs 20-30 minutes continuously and gets "just slight warm to the touch". I hope that Badger will replace the regulator/filter and return the same unit to you.
 
I have tested several airbrush compressors in last few years. 2 twin piston, made-in-Taiwan compressors (Sparmax and Paasche) got only slight warn after 30 minutes running. 3 single piston, made-in-China compressors all got hot to the touch (45-55 degrees above room temperature). Yours is the first "single piston, made-in-China" one which does not get hot.
  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Saturday, August 4, 2012 7:16 PM

I've returned the compressor. atm I'm not sure if I want to try another TC910 or different brand/model... I still want one but maybe look around for a bit.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Saturday, August 4, 2012 8:33 PM

JackB

I've returned the compressor. atm I'm not sure if I want to try another TC910 or different brand/model... I still want one but maybe look around for a bit.

If you get a good quality twin piston compressor, you should not need an airtank. If you have an Hobby Lobby nearby, take a look at the Storm Force compressor. It is the Sparmax TC-2000.

But is may be about $10 over 200 even with the 40% coupon. It is well worth it for a compressor with established track record in reliability. The Iwata Powerjet Lite is similar, but priced higher.

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by Bick on Sunday, August 5, 2012 7:10 AM

Jack,

Sorry to hear of your disappointment with the TC910. I've had mine for 6 months now and it works just fine. That said, the TC910 isn't the only AB compressor around and, as Kei Lau said, the Sparmax TC-2000 is a nice, well made and very quiet compressor. Friend of mine has one and is delighted with it. You can get one for  $199 with free shipping from:

http://www.dixieart.com/Sparmax_Compressors.html

If you want a tank, the Sparmax TC-620X is also a great compressor but $100 more expensive. I have no relation to Dixie Art but have purchased from them and have always had great service. Hope you find one to your liking.

  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Sunday, August 5, 2012 7:13 AM

linky.

www.dixieart.com/Sparmax_Compressors.html

The Sparmax TC-620X is almost the same as the Iwata Power Jet and they come from the same factory. Only the TC-620X is $200 cheaper.

It is good to see one of the major airbrush vendor picking up the Sparmax compressor line again.

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Kingsport, TN.
Posted by 01JeepXJ on Sunday, August 5, 2012 10:24 AM

Go to Lowes or a real hardware store & look at their units. Get at least 1/2h.p. with tank,regulator, filter etc. For the $$ ya'll are talkin', you can get a GREAT set up for that kinda $$'s.  

I have a Campbell-Hausfeld, 1/2h.p. for over 20 years, use it to air the tires on my Jeeps,riding mower & paint with. Check 'em out!!  

Never try to teach a pig to sing. It's a waste of time and only annoys the pig.

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Sunday, August 5, 2012 1:15 PM

@Bick, I'm not too disappointed in the TC910, jut think I got a bad unit or shipping damage. I would still consider another try.

@01JeepXJ, thanks will take a look. I have also looked into local Harbor Freight compressors.

So guys what is the advantage of the twin? over a model with a tank ? I would think pressure is more consistent from a tanked unit.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Sunday, August 5, 2012 1:58 PM

JackB

So guys what is the advantage of the twin? over a model with a tank ? I would think pressure is more consistent from a tanked unit.

The twin obviously offers more power, but as the pistons are 1/2 a stroke away from each other pulsation while not removed is dampened & is generally not noticeable.

For modelling, if I had the choice of single with tank or twin without, I would opt for the single with tank - no matter what you do with a tank-less twin, the auto on/off is going to kick the compressor in every time you demand air & at lower pressures & constant demand it may even cycle on/off in quite a frustrating manner. Another couple of benefit of having a tank is that during the compressors life time it will go through far less on/off cycles (less wear) & the tank also assists in cooling the air & helps remove any moisture which may be present.

 
  • Member since
    April 2004
  • From: Windy city, US
Posted by keilau on Sunday, August 5, 2012 2:39 PM

Milairjunkie

JackB

So guys what is the advantage of the twin? over a model with a tank ? I would think pressure is more consistent from a tanked unit.

The twin obviously offers more power, but as the pistons are 1/2 a stroke away from each other pulsation while not removed is dampened & is generally not noticeable.

For modelling, if I had the choice of single with tank or twin without, I would opt for the single with tank - no matter what you do with a tank-less twin, the auto on/off is going to kick the compressor in every time you demand air & at lower pressures & constant demand it may even cycle on/off in quite a frustrating manner. Another couple of benefit of having a tank is that during the compressors life time it will go through far less on/off cycles (less wear) & the tank also assists in cooling the air & helps remove any moisture which may be present.

I agree with Martin (Milairjunkie) that the auto-on-off without a tank can be distracting. But I still prefer a twin piston over a single with tank. The twin piston runs cooler and quieter, thus, probably last longer. Even with a tank, the compressor motor still kicks on and off, but less frequent. Because it does not synchronize with my trigger action, it is even more distracting. I can live with either.

I started out with a twin piston compressor without a tank. It worked perfectly. But just out of curiosity, I added an airtank myself. It makes no difference to the compressor performance. But the auto-on-off is different as mentioned above. If the compressor is quiet enough to begin with, it really does not matter.

Martin has a business selling airbrush equipments. He is very knowledgeable about compressors. He may have a very good point about the low pressure setting problem. But I have not experienced that.

I love this forum which provides a wealth of information from a lot of knowledgeable users.

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by Bick on Sunday, August 5, 2012 6:00 PM

Jack,

Just some personal thoughts, NOT recommendations.

Contractor type compressors from hardware, DIY stores:  I have a Husky with a 3 gal tank which I bought at Lowes. Don't remember but I think it was $70. It works fine as an AB compressor IF noise is not a problem. Adjustable pressure to over 100 PSI and down to zero but so noisy that it scares the bejeezus out of me when it turns on. Works fine, just noisy. Works great for light duty air hammers and filling your tires too.

Harbor Freight compressors: I have the 1/8 hp model and have used it for over three years with no problems. It is quiet enough (you can hold a conversation while it's running) but, depending on AB pressure, depress the AB trigger and it cycles every fraction of a second or so. With the regulator and a 10 ft AB hose I didn't notice any pulsing. It's still working fine. Mine does not get hot with normal (me normal?) use.

BUT, for the reasons mentioned by Milairjunkie I wanted an AB compressor with a tank. I thought about adding a tank to the HF compressor as KeiLau has done with his compressor but when Amazon had the TC910 for $180 less than MSRP I went for it. So,what did I get? A compressor that meets my WANTS. It's quiet, fills to capacity in a little over a minute, sits quietly on the bench until I use it, cycles every few minutes rather than seconds and has been working fine.

BUT now, I think I want a twin with a tank and Dixie Arts price is tempting. The quest never ends!

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Friday, September 14, 2012 12:38 PM

Update.

I have another Badger TC-910 ordered up and should be here mid-late next week. Keeping my fingers crossed & hope it's a winner this time :)

I wanted to note that I spoke with Badger support via email a few weeks ago and I informed them and sent picture of how/where the box was damaged in shipping (even though their compressor was well packaged). They noted that they were seeing some issues with gauges etc on these models. I told them that is exactly where it took the hit so maybe add more protection there.

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

  • Member since
    February 2015
Posted by Bick on Friday, September 14, 2012 5:25 PM

Hi Jack,

Nice to hear that you have a new TC910 on the way.  Hope this one arrives without damage!! Mine's still chugging away with nary a hiccup. BTW, since mine seems to have passed a more the six month test with no problems I decided to replace the 0-100 PSI regulator gauge with a 0-60 PSI one. It was an easy swap (remove case, remove old gauge, screw on new gauge, replace case and done) and I really like the 0-60 gauge. Hasn't made any difference in how it works but I can read pressures that I use more accurately. If I have a problem before the 1 yr guarantee expires I'm not concerned and will tell Badger what I did. Can take a pic if interested.

  • Member since
    July 2012
Posted by JackB on Friday, September 14, 2012 5:57 PM

Hi Bick,

That sounds great, I would probably to do the same in future. Can I ask where did you get the 0-60 gauge?

Currently working on: Dragon 1/35 Tiger I, Initial Production s.Pz.Abt.502

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.