SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

First attempt airbrushing acrylics

567 views
10 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July, 2008
First attempt airbrushing acrylics
Posted by scigs30 on Friday, March 24, 2017 1:22 PM

First I would like to say that the builds I see on these forums are amazing, the attention to details, craftsmanship and dedication is outstanding. The majority of the builds I see here make it diffecult to distinguish a model from the real plane.   My builds are simple and more for nostalgia of old Monogram and Revell kits I great up with. I am lucky that the kits from the 70s and 80s are dirt cheap and I have a good collection of them.  I came back into this hobby a couple of years ago and have been trying to find my building style and now I am trying acrylics.  I really like Testors enamels, they are easy to use and come in many colors.  The only issue I have is the strong odors when working indoors even with a spray booth. I use Testors products because that is what my local hobby store carries and I dont have to order anything online, making life easy.  I wanted to build an old Monogram BF109 but did not want to ruin it if the acylics did not work out.  I am lucky that I have a complete sealed kit and one open kit with broken and missing parts that I can practice on.  I started by washing the plastic parts then building the model.  I then wiped it down once again and used Testors acyrlic primer followed by Testors acrylics.  I must say they airbrushed really nice and had no issues with spraying.  The issue I had was some lifting of paint after masking with Tamyia tape.  I figured the primer had no bite since that is what lifted from the plastic. I dont want to get too complicated when painting so I am going to paint another old kit I have laying around.  This time I am going to use real spray can primer then airbrush the acyrlics and see how that works.  If it does not work then back to enamels, but that will be a bummer limiting on where I can paint. You can see from the pictures where the paint lifted at the prop, canopy and tail wing. 

  • Member since
    August, 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Friday, March 24, 2017 2:11 PM

I have taken to using a grey Scotchbrite pad to go over the plastic after washing and before prime and again (lightly) before paint. 

Used tamiya acrylics on a BUFF, no primer, and had no lifting problem even when the Tamiya tape was left on for nearly 3 weeks.

Can get the various "grits" of Scotchbrite pads at any auto body supply store, most parts houses,  or you might beg acouple from a local body shop.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, March 24, 2017 4:51 PM

Use another primer. Certainly something with more tooth, adhesion properties, and durability. Testors Acrylic primer is just like the rest of their Acrylic line- poor adhesion to bare plastic being a constant. Once your surface is primed, your Testors Acrylics will stay in place better. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    July, 2008
Posted by scigs30 on Friday, March 24, 2017 5:25 PM

I am going to use a real primer from a can so I hope it works. I am impressed with the ease of airbrushing the Model Master acrylics and fast dry times.  Better yet there is no smell inside the house and clean up is so easy compared to enamels.

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Friday, March 24, 2017 5:46 PM

Some time ago I relied on primers with a bit of lacquer thinner added, which gave a bit more bite and adhered to the plastic more firmly. Then there were virtually no lifting problems, the lacquer thinner acted in a manner that attacked the plastic and it bonded to the surface.

Now I first wash and rinse the parts on the sprues, then before painting a good wipe down with alcohol. For some time badger's Stynylrez primer has served me well for an overall coat, then any paint type sticks well with no lifting issues.

As was suggested, a good scrubbing with a mildly abrasive surface will prep the plastic prior to any painting. I use foam pads from the beauty supply shop, seems about like 1200 grit. A good primer coat is essential for cars or airplanes, (full size,) I doubt that any pro shop would try to turn out a quality job without priming, unless painting over a good paint job already in place, properly sanded and prepped.

 

  • Member since
    July, 2008
Posted by scigs30 on Friday, March 24, 2017 5:53 PM

On my Revell P40 practice model I did wash the plastic on the sprue. When she is ready to paint I will roughen the surface a bit and use Testors laquer primer.

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, March 24, 2017 6:36 PM

patrick206

 

 

 A good primer coat is essential for cars or airplanes, (full size,) I doubt that any pro shop would try to turn out a quality job without priming, unless painting over a good paint job already in place, properly sanded and prepped.

 

 

Well there are big differences between a real aircraft or auto and our plastic model kits:

1) the surfaces involved, and

2) the paints or lacquers used on them

3) the conditions these items will operate in and what is expected of the paint under those conditions. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Sunday, March 26, 2017 8:50 AM

stikpusher

 

 
patrick206

 

 

 A good primer coat is essential for cars or airplanes, (full size,) I doubt that any pro shop would try to turn out a quality job without priming, unless painting over a good paint job already in place, properly sanded and prepped.

 

 

 

 

Well there are big differences between a real aircraft or auto and our plastic model kits:

1) the surfaces involved, and

2) the paints or lacquers used on them

3) the conditions these items will operate in and what is expected of the paint under those conditions. 

 

Agreed Stik, big differences and conditions. But I find many similarities between painting models and the real items. If the real item has had repair work done, then fillers and metal work will be factors that do require priming. I consider it alike when I have used fillers and plastic work in the modeling process.

My routine is to prime the entire surface when assembled, doing that has resulted in close to zero lifting problems, and the sanded primer surface allows for a dependably smooth paint finish at the end. 

If I used mostly military flat or semi gloss paints it would make a difference in my routine, but I favor airliners and corporate jets. Those gloss finishes are quite demanding, and full prime coats have made improvements for my use.

Your point is well made, a model when finished sits on display. A commercial jet on departure or approach will encounter rain and hail, while still flying at speeds of 250 to 350 knots. Rough conditions. Thanks for the response.

Patrick

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, March 26, 2017 12:06 PM

Exactly! And military hardware need not be shiny, but in addition to dealing with the worst that Mother Nature will throw out, also must deal with issues such as reducing visual, radar, and infrared signatures, nuclear flash, chemical attack, associated decontamination procedures for those things, etc.... priming for adhesion on multi media surfaces of our models. But for those military subject, rarely a need to get the shiny smooth. Just for that pesky resin and PE, or to find those imperfections needing filling. But occasional builds have no such problems, and if you're working with certain paints, the primer can be skipped. I do the military side of the house, although the occasional Thunderbird or Blue Angel requires that shiny finish preperation approach on occasion. 

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    December, 2015
Posted by Dash8 on Sunday, March 26, 2017 1:55 PM

I am a Testors MMA disciple, love the stuff, one of the few on here lol. For extra tooth I scuff sand the plasitc with 1000 grit sandpaper then soap and water rinse. No primer. I still don't mask, insted I use card stock to control overspray to switch colors or will pencil line in and hand brush the second color in. Works for me, I also use a 0.3mm needle. As you can see from the photo, 1000 grit does not affect the raised panel lines at all. Wish I could afford the whole retail rack I would get one.

Dash from Canada

 

On the bench: Revell Euro Fighter 1/32

Ontario, CANADA

 

  • Member since
    July, 2008
Posted by scigs30 on Sunday, March 26, 2017 2:01 PM

I really like how well MMA spray and the cleanup is easy and fast.  I will see how well primer works since there are times I want to mask.

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS

SUBSCRIBER-ONLY CONTENT
FREE NEWSLETTER