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How do i stay safe spraying Lacquer with no spray booth, and just an open window and a fan?

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  • Member since
    March, 2007
How do i stay safe spraying Lacquer with no spray booth, and just an open window and a fan?
Posted by KAYSEE88 on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 12:41 PM

my workspace is basically my dining table that is near a big window, and an outlet for only the compressor and a simple fan.

I only spray once in a Looong while, and i stay safe using acrylics but this 1 time I'm limited to Lacquer spray can paints by kit color requirements.

So how do i stay safe without a spray booth? There are 3 colors i need to put on too

Thanks for any advice friends! 2 cents

 

  • Member since
    June, 2014
Posted by bluenote on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 1:02 PM

KAYSEE88

my workspace is basically my dining table that is near a big window, and an outlet for only the compressor and a simple fan.

I only spray once in a Looong while, and i stay safe using acrylics but this 1 time I'm limited to Lacquer spray can paints by kit color requirements.

So how do i stay safe without a spray booth? There are 3 colors i need to put on too

Thanks for any advice friends! 2 cents

 

I don't think you have much to worry about.  Spray painting only takes a couple of minutes, and if you have a window open, fan blowing out the fumes and also a mask, then that's more than fine in my opinion.  

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 2:26 PM

Lacquer spray cans huh? A respirator is a must for may going to do it in several light coats rather than one heavy coat. Why not do it in the garage with the door open or the cellar instead?

  • Member since
    April, 2006
  • From: ON, Canada
Posted by jgeratic on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 2:34 PM

I would second the mask, all paint mist is harmful, even acrylic.

Seriously consider investing in one, the type that has disposable filter discs.  Although acrylic fumes aren't as harmful, the paint mist if inhaled, is very much so.  I might be  wrong, but I always thought if you can smell it while spraying, you are deffinetly inhaling some bad stuff?  With spring/summer arriving, there must be some place outdoors you could use those spray cans?

regards,

Jack

 

  • Member since
    July, 2004
  • From: Sunny So. Cal... The OC
Posted by stikpusher on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 5:59 PM

If you're working with spray cans, why not work outside? In this case you're not tied down with a compressor and associated power source.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    March, 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 6:30 PM

It doesn't take much time and exposure to just about any paint fumes/particulates, to exceed safe levels. If you are reasonably handy, you could arrange any sort of box shape material like cardboard or plastic storage unit, with a hole to allow a flexible dryer duct to be inserted at the back. A small fan at the window end of the duct facing outside and you'll move a lot of air away from you, the fumes go with it.

Duct tape can help make positive seals, it doesn't have to be great looking to be effective. My first one was a real Frankenstein, but surprisingly efficient. Cost maybe $20.00. Good rule of thumb, "if you can smell it, get rid of it."

Also, have a look at you tube, many examples and construction methods. Good luck with it.

Patrick 

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Tuesday, March 28, 2017 8:40 PM

Also, don't be afraid to deviate a bit from the colors specified in the kit instructions.  You can probably find a close acrylic equivalent, or mix one.  

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    April, 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 3:00 AM

Is there a reason you can't spray outside, what are you painting & what are the lacquer paint brand and colours you are intending to use?

I sometimes use car primers & High-build primers, rattle can acrylic with lacquer smell.

I spray these outside, using a large cardboard box or bin for the overspray, purely becouse they smell so bad.

 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 1:42 PM

The problem with painting a model outdoors is the dust, dirt and sand blowing around.  Unless there is no wind, or you live in a bedrock neighborhood, you will get some crud on the model. If you are spraying flat paint that might be okay if it is a clean neighborhood, but it is really hard to get a good gloss finish unless it is absolutely still air.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 11:14 PM

Don Stauffer

The problem with painting a model outdoors is the dust, dirt and sand blowing around.  Unless there is no wind, or you live in a bedrock neighborhood, you will get some crud on the model. If you are spraying flat paint that might be okay if it is a clean neighborhood, but it is really hard to get a good gloss finish unless it is absolutely still air.

 

 

 

Not if you have a well kept finished clean garage. I've used spray paints in the garage and outdoors lots of times with no issues (except of course when humidity kicks into play I avoid doing any painting then.) When outdoors, I place my kit /sprues on a top of a cardboard box in the middle of the yard. (the box will be on an old table - not onthe ground) Then I immediately bring it inside the garage or indoors to dry.

  • Member since
    March, 2017
  • From: West Virginia U.S.A
Posted by Matt B on Friday, March 31, 2017 2:47 PM

Your best bet, as stated earlier, would be to invest in a respiratory mask. Even if you're only spraying on a small scale. It doesn't take very much to cause harm to you're lungs & nervous system. Especially if you repeatedly do this to yourself. Just make sure that you get the correct filters. Some don't protect against oil based aerosols. The 3M model 6311 can be found on amazon for $23.00 It comes with everything you'll need.

  • Member since
    May, 2006
  • From: Irmo, South Carolina
Posted by Shipwreck on Friday, March 31, 2017 3:52 PM

What I use to do when using a  rattle can, before the paint booth, was to go out side and put the model in a box and spray away; then immediately close up the box.

 

After saving about $500 for a paint booth; I could not find one big enough for my builds. I finally bought two of the portable hobby kits for $80 each at Walmart and now have 33" to spray my big bombers and ships!

On the Bench:

     1/48 Star Wars X-wing

On Deck:

     1/48 P-47D Razorback

     1/48 Nieuport Ni-17

     1/350 USS Hornet CV-8

    

  • Member since
    January, 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Saturday, April 01, 2017 8:38 AM

Shipwreck

What I use to do when using a  rattle can, before the paint booth, was to go out side and put the model in a box and spray away; then immediately close up the box.

 

After saving about $500 for a paint booth; I could not find one big enough for my builds. I finally bought two of the portable hobby kits for $80 each at Walmart and now have 33" to spray my big bombers and ships!

 

That's how did most of my spraying with a rattle can in my youth. Winter and rain, I did mine in the attic since it was an unfinished attic anyway. Summertime was great because the attic would be hot with zero humidity, paint would dry and cure quicker. A little corner in the cellar would be my alternate area during winter months.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, April 01, 2017 9:25 AM

I know it shows my age, but they didn't have spray cans when I started modeling!  First spray can I ever saw squirted whip cream onto deserts!  Only thing that ever got to me, however, was Floquil, even brushed on.  My only ventilation in my basement workshop was that there was no door to stairway leading upstairs.  Started feeling giddy and had to take a long break.  Learned to avoid long painting sessions with that stuff.  Neither Testors nor Aero Gloss dope ever affected me like that!

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    March, 2003
  • From: Virginia
Posted by Wingman_kz on Saturday, April 01, 2017 1:52 PM

If you normally airbrush then how about decanting the paints you plan to use into jars or bottles and then airbrush?

Basically,  just tape a straw over the nozzle opening on the spray can, spray into a jar or bottle, cap them loosely and let sit overnite to gas out the propellant. It can get a little messy but you get the hang of it. You can thin the paint to airbrush if needed.

Not nearly as much overspray with an airbrush but still take normal precautions. 

Just a thought...

Tony

            

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