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Good old plain Paint Thinner

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Good old plain Paint Thinner
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, October 31, 2003 10:37 PM
From my local Wal-Mart I picked up a bottle of something just called Paint Thinner.

It says it is an economical alternative to turpentine and can be used to thin all enamel paints.

I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with this for both cleaning brushes and thinning for airbrushing.

The common thought on these forums seems to be that lacquer thinner works the best for both these functions but i dont want to deal with the fumes that it gives off. What is my best bet? Mineral spirits?

Please let me know what you think

Swandive
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 1, 2003 8:16 AM
Swandive,
While I dont claim to be an expert on the subject...I have recieve lots of advice on this in the past. It seems everyone has thier prefrence and a product they swear by. I used to use "specialty" thinners (basically the thinner the paint manufacturer recommended)....well this got real expensive quick.
For MM enamels I use a low-odor mineral spirits purchased in a gallon jug from Wally world! I think I paid $5.97(roughly 2 bucks more for something low-odor)...I have had no problems using this product for general brush cleaning...and as a thinner for washes. I have not however used it for airbrushing...Im still using model master thinner for that(actually I havent used my airbrush in about 6-8 yrs)...For MM Acryl or other Acryl products...I use regular tap water or Denatured Alcohol for brush cleaning....The same goes for Tamiya paints....so far Ive had good results with using these.
Is there something better out there to use? Im sure there is. Will you get other recomendations? Im sure you will....taste and personal prefrence has a lot to do with this.
As far as airbrushing with the "product" you bought I cant comment on that...because of my airbrush not being used.
Hope this is of some help.
You may want to experiment with it and see how it works for you...if so look foward to hearing your results.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 1, 2003 12:38 PM
Thanks for your advice HistoryinScale. Im sure this stuff will work well for cleaning, but i just want to be sure that i wont damage my model or my airbrush when i use it. Ill just wait and see if anyone else has any other comments

Swandive
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by naplak on Sunday, November 2, 2003 8:54 PM
Yup... I would go with the Low Odor -- I get mine at Craft Warehouse.

I use it for thinning and cleaning.
www.naplak.com/modeling ... a free site for modelers www.scalehobby.com/forum/index.php ... a nice Modeling Forum
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: The flat lands of the Southeast
Posted by styrene on Monday, November 3, 2003 6:43 AM
There should be no conflict in using basic paint thinner in airbrushing applications, provided it's an enamel thinner you bought. Most enamel thinners are a mineral spirit (petroleum distillate) base, and can also be used for cleaning, washes, etc. Because petroleum-based thinners contain longer chained aliphatic hydrocarbons, you can expect slightly longer drying times than some of the "hotter" enamel thinners. The nice thing about these thinners is that they are lots cheaper than the Testors thinners, and tend to work just as well. However, I would experiment with them a little to make sure they work well for your intended application.
Gip Winecoff

1882: "God is dead"--F. Nietzsche

1900: "Nietzsche is dead"--God

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Savannah, GA USA
Posted by Bones-coa on Tuesday, November 4, 2003 7:02 AM
I've just found also that if, while doing any brush painting, if you dip the brush slightly in mineral spirits, it thins the paint just slight enough to almost make brush maks disappear. I think it adds to the dry time as well as thinning it. This seems to allow the paint to "settle" and thus prevent brush streaks. This was with MM enamels mind you.

Dana
Dana F On the bench: Tamiya DO335B-2 with LOTS of Aires stuff (On Hold) Trumpeter A-10 with LOTS and LOTS of aftermarket goodies! (On Hold) Tamiya 240ZG (In work)
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