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Dear SuperGlue

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  • Member since
    August, 2017
Dear SuperGlue
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, August 31, 2018 1:43 PM

Why do you always stick instantly when I don't want you to, but then not stick instantly when I do want you to?

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Friday, August 31, 2018 2:24 PM

laskdjn

Why do you always stick instantly when I don't want you to, but then not stick instantly when I do want you to?

 

Laughing. I totally agree!  I just experienced the issue of sticking instantly. I had to pry it off and try again. After doing that three times in a row... I said, ENOUGH! I have a new method for applying PE. I am using sprue-goo. It works great! It gives you time to position the piece, and it has a pretty decent hold. Probably not as good as superglue, but good enough.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Friday, August 31, 2018 2:41 PM

Smile

-Greg

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Friday, August 31, 2018 2:51 PM

Please elaborate on using this "spru-goo" on photo etch.

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Friday, August 31, 2018 3:08 PM

Sprue-goo is a homemade concoction using liquid cement to melt sprue. If you Google it you will find several references to it. I posted below just one of the links available. You can use it as a filler, and now I am using it to attach PE. It's use for PE will be dependent on the pieces you are gluing. Mostly--based on where it needs to be applied and if it's a visible area. CA glue is less visible. A glop of sprue-goo may not always be the thing to reach for.

In times past, I had mixed results with sprue-goo. It was not until I tried making a batch using Tamiya Liquid Cement that it really came to life for me. It seems to cut the plastic beautifully. Also--with the previous cement that I used--it for some reason caused air bubbles in the mixture. With Tamiya--I see very little of that. And--if you use the Tamiya jar--it comes with that handy applicator. That works really well for applying this stuff to tiny areas.

Updated: You don't have to put a ton of it on. I wipe the excess from the applicator and apply a thin coat to the backside of the PE. Apply as much as you can without it oozing out when you press the piece down. Then you can position the piece exactly how you want it and let it cure. It works great as a filler too. And it sands nicely. This is quickly becoming my go-to product. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdVBcMOn9R8

 

 

  • Member since
    July, 2013
Posted by steve5 on Friday, August 31, 2018 4:20 PM

thanks for that steve , I've heard of it , but never seen it used . Going to make some now .

 

  • Member since
    September, 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, August 31, 2018 4:47 PM

Share the frustration. Currently I'm using Microscale Krystal Klear to tack the rail, then come back with runny superglue when its positioned.

  • Member since
    May, 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Friday, August 31, 2018 4:54 PM

Ha-ha, I know that scenario all too well!  (I think we all do.). But yeah, why does superglue do that?  When the part is mispositioned, the glue sets up immediately and takes on the grip of epoxy or urethane adhesive.  When you try to attach that super delicate fiddly part, it turns to snot.  Then sets up all over the place as you try to wipe up the gooey mess.  That’s why I only use CA when absolutely necessary.

  • Member since
    August, 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Friday, August 31, 2018 5:14 PM
For PE that is going to take a minute to get in the right position like rails I will use gator grip glue. It has a work time of a few minutes and holds just as well as super glue.

Clint

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, September 01, 2018 9:45 AM

I notice that CA glue sticks to my fingers much better than model stuff.

And why do I keep putting my hobby knives down on the bench exactly where the pallet for CA glue is?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Saturday, September 01, 2018 10:04 AM

Hello!

Once I've read that CA glue was originally developed for medicine, to glue wound edges and stop bleeding - wouldn't this explain why it glues fingers a lot better than plastic?

I have one tip for all of you that use CA - give the surfaces to be glued a quick wipe with lacquer thinner. After that CA bonds much faster and stronger, too!

Good luck with your modelling projects and have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    July, 2014
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, September 01, 2018 10:04 AM

Don Stauffer
And why do I keep putting my hobby knives down on the bench exactly where the pallet for CA glue is?

Laughing. That happened to me once or twice too. Then another time a piece of PE jumped out of my fingers right into .. you guessed it. It went into the CA on my pallet. No matter that I keep the pallet well away from where I am working. It magically found its way there, like a fly to rotting meat. What are the odds?

 

  • Member since
    June, 2018
Posted by ARDVARK003 on Saturday, September 01, 2018 6:31 PM
Laskdji, I've stuck lots of parts and misc things to my fingers and post-note glue pallets to my fore arms. I use slow ca and accelerator alot, more forgiving. AARDVARK
  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, September 02, 2018 6:36 AM

ARDVARK003
Laskdji, I've stuck lots of parts and misc things to my fingers and post-note glue pallets to my fore arms. I use slow ca and accelerator alot, more forgiving. AARDVARK
 


I also use the slow gel CA.  But I don't notice at the time where I set the tool down, so it is usually too late by the time I see it  :-(

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Sunday, September 02, 2018 3:11 PM

ARDVARK003
Laskdji, I've stuck lots of parts and misc things to my fingers and post-note glue pallets to my fore arms. I use slow ca and accelerator alot, more forgiving. AARDVARK
 

Or when glue seepage dries instantly to my tweezers, but not my intended location...

  • Member since
    July, 2014
  • From: Meridian, ID
Posted by modelcrazy on Sunday, September 02, 2018 4:27 PM

Don Stauffer

I notice that CA glue sticks to my fingers much better than model stuff.

And why do I keep putting my hobby knives down on the bench exactly where the pallet for CA glue is?

 

Ditto

CA was originally formulated for IS used for surgery. The moisture is what accelerates the drying time, but not too much moisture. That's why it sticks to your skin so fast and not so fast to plastics and metal. It uses the moisture in the air to harden so a day with higher humidity will make it dry faster than a dry day. I have used water (usually successfully) as an accelerator. The manufacturers accelerator works much better but once its on the plastic, that area will be almost impossible to CA again should the part break off. That's why use accelerator as a nuclear option, if all else fails.

Steve

ON THE BENCH

1/48 Tamiya Mk.1 Swordfish
1/350 Tamiya Prince of Wales

In Que

1/700 Tamiya King George V

 

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Sunday, September 02, 2018 6:48 PM

FROM THE DESK OF  SUPER GLUE

 

  Dear Laskdjn,

I'm sorry I stuck your finger's together, and not your part's.

I can be a "Fickle Misstres" sometime's, but I can be Helpful as well.

I hope I can make up for this by giving you the neccessary "Stick-to-it-ivness" that you require to complete your model.

As other's on this Forun have mentioned, you are not the only one to "Feel My Rath" ( just ask Little Timmy about the time I stuck an exaust pipe to his eyebrow)

Hope we can still be friend's ,

                                                         Your's Truely,

                                                                            SUPER GlUE

 Dont worry about the thumbprint, paint it Rust , and call it "Battle Damage".

  

 

    

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Sydney, Australia
Posted by Phil_H on Sunday, September 02, 2018 7:22 PM

modelcrazy
The moisture is what accelerates the drying time, but not too much moisture. That's why it sticks to your skin so fast and not so fast to plastics and metal.

I once squeezed a tube (with a blocked tip) too hard and it burst all over my hand. Not knowing any better at the time, I stuck my hand under a tap to wash it off and was rewarded with an instant rock-hard second skin. That's one mistake I'll never repeat.

Yes, moisture is one key factor. The other is contact area between the two pieces being joined.The bigger the contact area and the closer the contact, the better the join. 

  • Member since
    August, 2017
Posted by laskdjn on Tuesday, September 04, 2018 12:12 PM

littletimmy

FROM THE DESK OF  SUPER GLUE

 

  Dear Laskdjn,

I'm sorry I stuck your finger's together, and not your part's.

I can be a "Fickle Misstres" sometime's, but I can be Helpful as well.

I hope I can make up for this by giving you the neccessary "Stick-to-it-ivness" that you require to complete your model.

As other's on this Forun have mentioned, you are not the only one to "Feel My Rath" ( just ask Little Timmy about the time I stuck an exaust pipe to his eyebrow)

Hope we can still be friend's ,

                                                         Your's Truely,

                                                                            SUPER GlUE

 

 

That's hilarious.

As an aside, I didn't know water could accelerate CA glue.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Tuesday, September 04, 2018 1:28 PM

That's Right !

 The idea was  low scarring by using this product .The moisture in the skin is what makes it so super sticky . Now for P.E. I use either slow set C.A. or Aleens " sticky " White craft Glue ! 

 i have used sprue glue , But , This version is like honey and works great . What I like about Slow Set C.A. Is I take it , Line my part up and using a toothpick , Put dots where I need them .Then I hit them with a skewer point full of accelerator ! 

 Done !  And the accelerator causes the C.A.To " wick " and spread the glue without a mess .

  • Member since
    February, 2007
Posted by mitsdude on Sunday, September 09, 2018 12:41 PM

I got a huge scare once using SG. I was squeezing a tube that was clogged and like a big dummy I was watching to see if anything was comming out. The clog broke loose and several blobs of glue splattered all over my glasses lens, eyebrow, and cheek. Small price to pay for a new pair of glasses.

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Sunday, September 09, 2018 1:43 PM

Well, this stuff CAN be scary. Do you know that funny feeling when you ar looking at some CA glue setting from above? That's CA fog setting on your eyes...

Then again, some day i pushed a bottle of CA over the edge of my bench. I watched it fall, trying to catch it or something, and then it hit the ground squarely with the bottom of the bottle and that impact sent a few droplets of CA high speed straight into my eye. Oh yeah, that was scary. Luckily I was able to wash it all out, but the heart sure started to beat faster for a moment...

So please stay safe and watch out... Still you'll need some luck! Have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    January, 2014
Posted by gobobbie on Monday, September 10, 2018 6:10 AM

It seems like the older you get, the more the brain unlocks. I have started wearing safety glasses at the bench whenever the solvents, glue or other nasties are out. 

 

  • Member since
    August, 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Monday, September 10, 2018 8:34 AM

This stuff can be scary for sure.

I dropped an open bottle of extra thin on the floor which made a large puddle. When attempting to blot it up with paper towels the paper towels started smoking and caught fire. Of course the towels where glued to my fingers by then and they where burned before I could extricate myself from them. I since put a band of modeling clay around the bottom of every bottle of CA I use to prevent spillage like this...works great.

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Monday, September 10, 2018 2:27 PM

gobobbie - those safety glasses sure sound like a good idea... Too bad I usually only remember it AFTER something happens...

jay jay - I have read about it before. It said CA has a nasty tendency to give off heat in connection with cotton. And I suppose they add something similar to cotton to paper towels to prevent them from ripping when wet. I've already experienced CA getting hot when curing, but luckily I've never got it as far that it would catch fire. That would be really bad in a place where all the solvents stand :-((

Have a nice, safe day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, September 11, 2018 8:40 AM

CA is not the only thing that gets hot when it cures.  I mixed up a paper cup full of expoxy one day to fiberglas something I was building. I was slow in working it, so it fully activated in the cup.  The cup started smoking, then charing!  I ran outside with it because I expected it to burst into flames in the shop. It didn't flame, but that paper cup ended up black and brown!

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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