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Dremel

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  • Member since
    July, 2006
  • From: Clearwater, FL
Dremel
Posted by Gymbo-59 on Friday, October 28, 2016 9:44 AM

Good morning.  I'm in the market for a Dremel.  I have my late Fathers.  It's a bit old and only works on high rpm, so it only serves to melt the plastic on any model.  Can anyone recommend one with a variable speed that would work well on lower rpm's? Thanks, Gymbo.

Duct tape is like the force.  It has a dark side & light side and it holds the universe together.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, October 29, 2016 10:13 AM

I have two Dremels, variable speed models, and they both work fine on plastic.

The AC model is a Multi Pro model 305, and it lists the speeds as 5000 - 30,000.

The battery one is a Multipro cordless, rated at 5000 to 25,000 but the slow speed looks to me to be way slower than that, more like 500 to 1000. 

In any case the speeds are apparently not feedback controlled, and any load on them slows them down considerably.  On the battery job, the abrasive sleeve tool will actually stall on plastic at the lowest setting, so I have to set it up to about a 3 to get it to grind at all.  Not sure if those models are still available, but they sure work swell.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2006
  • From: N. Georgia
Posted by Jester75 on Saturday, October 29, 2016 11:37 AM

 

I purchased this one about 6 months ago and I don't think I could live without it now. I added the drill chuck attachment to it which makes changing bits very easy and it holds the smallest bits wih ease.

https://www.dremel.com/en_US/products/-/show-product/tools/8050-micro

Eric

 

  • Member since
    April, 2009
  • From: Lowell City, Mars
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Saturday, October 29, 2016 12:40 PM

Dremel tool models are like streetcars- there'll soon be another along!

Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
    May, 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Saturday, October 29, 2016 11:02 PM

Well, looks like I have the opportunity to climb back onto one of my favorite pedestals.

Dremel Moto-Tools are great tools, but for modelers they turn too daggone fast. Even the slowest speeds on the variable-speed models are too fast for comfort.

I got my Dremel (a single-speed model) about forty years ago, by winning it in a contest. It was almost completely useless for my purposes - until I bought what Dremel called a "Tabletop Speed Controller." With the tool plugged into that little box, I could set the dial to zero, start the tool, put the drill bit (or whatever) exactly where I wanted it, and gradually ramp up the juice to the speed I wanted. Perfect.

Now that little box is gone, but Dremel still sells a foot pedal speed control. My suggestion: get a Model 100 single-speed Moto-Tool and plug it into that gadget. (Dremels with built-in speed controls don't get along well with external ones.) You'll find it's big and clunky, but you can make it go as slow as you like.

With a single-speed tool, you can also go the economy route. I built myself a speed controller out of parts from Lowe's: a dimmer switch, a duplex outlet, a plastic electrical box, and a piece of cord with a plug on the end. It doesn't work quite as smoothly as the Dremel version, but it works.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Dremel, give us a tiny, pencil-sized motor tool with speeds ranging from 0 to 1000 rpm. Modelers rarely need anything faster than that - and if they do, they can choose from all the other tools in the Dremel line.

 

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    February, 2003
  • From: Cameron, Texas
Posted by Texgunner on Sunday, October 30, 2016 7:40 AM

jtilley

Well, looks like I have the opportunity to climb back onto one of my favorite pedestals.

Dremel Moto-Tools are great tools, but for modelers they turn too daggone fast. Even the slowest speeds on the variable-speed models are too fast for comfort.

I got my Dremel (a single-speed model) about forty years ago, by winning it in a contest. It was almost completely useless for my purposes - until I bought what Dremel called a "Tabletop Speed Controller." With the tool plugged into that little box, I could set the dial to zero, start the tool, put the drill bit (or whatever) exactly where I wanted it, and gradually ramp up the juice to the speed I wanted. Perfect.

Now that little box is gone, but Dremel still sells a foot pedal speed control. My suggestion: get a Model 100 single-speed Moto-Tool and plug it into that gadget. (Dremels with built-in speed controls don't get along well with external ones.) You'll find it's big and clunky, but you can make it go as slow as you like.

With a single-speed tool, you can also go the economy route. I built myself a speed controller out of parts from Lowe's: a dimmer switch, a duplex outlet, a plastic electrical box, and a piece of cord with a plug on the end. It doesn't work quite as smoothly as the Dremel version, but it works.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. Dremel, give us a tiny, pencil-sized motor tool with speeds ranging from 0 to 1000 rpm. Modelers rarely need anything faster than that - and if they do, they can choose from all the other tools in the Dremel line.

 

 



Hear, hear!  I agree with you one hundred percent Professor Tilley.  I broke down 10-12 years ago and bought a Foredom motor tool with the foot control.  I couldn't be more pleased with it.  It has a forward and reverse, and the flexible "shaft".  It's an indispensable tool for me.YesYes

Gary


"All you mugs need to get busy building, and post pics!"

  • Member since
    April, 2013
Posted by KnightTemplar5150 on Sunday, October 30, 2016 9:47 AM

I'll second Gary's sentiments on the Foredom flex-shaft. Wonderful tools with precise speed control and incredible versatility that Dremels just can't match. I've had mine since the fall of 1991 and never had a problem, where I've managed to burn through four different models of Dremel in the same time.

  • Member since
    August, 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Sunday, October 30, 2016 10:01 AM

Check out the Halloween department at your local Lowes hardware store.   They have a pumpkin-carving Dremel on end of season sale.   Mine is 20 bucks, marked down from 30.  It is fine as long as you don't mind a bit of pumpkin bling

 

This tool features a battery pack using 4 replaceable AA batteries.   It is two-speed. listed at 7000 and 14000 RPM.   But if you use some tired batteries you can make it turn slower.   It uses standard 1/8 inch bits & burrs.

 

I have a flex-shaft tool which I use most often but there are some choices when you are on a budget

  • Member since
    May, 2008
  • From: Wyoming Michigan
Posted by ejhammer on Sunday, October 30, 2016 10:56 AM
Amen to the Foredom tool. I have two Dremels, one corded, one cordless. I do occasionally use the cordless, usually when building at an outside gathering away from the bench, but always use the Foredom at the bench. EJ

Completed - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa Dec 1942, USS Yorktown 1/700 Trumpeter 1943. In The Yards - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa 1945, USS ESSEX 1/700 Dragon 1944, USS ESSEX 1/700 Trumpeter 1945, USS ESSEX 1/540 Revell (vintage) 1962, USS ESSEX 1/350 Trumpeter 1942, USS ESSEX LHD-2 as commissioned, converted from USS Wasp kit Gallery Models. Plus 35 other plastic and wood ship kits.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, October 30, 2016 11:19 AM

I still have to disagree with Tilly and Gary.  Mine work fine on plastic, especially the battery one.  I usually use it with one of the sanding devices.  I use the lower speeds for plastic, higher speeds on wood and metal.  I find them great for inside curved areas, where a needle file just isn't practical.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Hokey on Sunday, October 30, 2016 2:52 PM

Don Stauffer

Mine work fine on plastic, especially the battery one.  I usually use it with one of the sanding devices.  I use the lower speeds for plastic, higher speeds on wood and metal.  I find them great for inside curved areas, where a needle file just isn't practical.

 

Don what is the model number for the 1 you like?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, October 31, 2016 9:19 AM

Hokey

 

 
Don Stauffer

Mine work fine on plastic, especially the battery one.  I usually use it with one of the sanding devices.  I use the lower speeds for plastic, higher speeds on wood and metal.  I find them great for inside curved areas, where a needle file just isn't practical.

 

 

 

Don what is the model number for the 1 you like?

 

Check the second post in this thread, above.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Hokey on Monday, October 31, 2016 3:48 PM

Don Stauffer

Check the second post in this thread, above.

If I look Dremel MultiPro Cordless up at Amazon I get this - http://amzn.to/2f6oWTB and I'm not sure its the same. It's specs list 2 speeds - 10K & 20K RPM.

This is a model 7700. What model do you have?

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, November 01, 2016 9:41 AM

Sorry- I notice I did not give the model number of my battery version- it is the Model 780.  Both models are multiple speeds, not just two speeds.  I think there are about eight speeds on them.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Hokey on Tuesday, November 01, 2016 4:23 PM

Don Stauffer

Sorry- I notice I did not give the model number of my battery version- it is the Model 780.  Both models are multiple speeds, not just two speeds.  I think there are about eight speeds on them.

Hitting head against wall! Nothing on Amazon or Ebay for a 780!

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, November 02, 2016 9:32 AM

Hokey

 

 
Don Stauffer

Sorry- I notice I did not give the model number of my battery version- it is the Model 780.  Both models are multiple speeds, not just two speeds.  I think there are about eight speeds on them.

 

 

Hitting head against wall! Nothing on Amazon or Ebay for a 780!

 

Try a google search.  Found many references.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February, 2011
Posted by Hokey on Wednesday, November 02, 2016 10:39 AM

Don Stauffer

Try a google search.  Found many references.

Thanks. Ya did that too. Most of those references are for old (sold) ebay ads, accessorie kits, battery replacements, manuals, etc. Didn't find any retail outlet viable. Its no longer in production. The 8050 seems closesrt to your 780 it seems.

https://www.dremel.com/en_US/products/-/show-product/tools/8050-micro

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, November 03, 2016 6:44 AM

Gymbo;

   What I have done is plug my old Dremel into a sewing machine foot control .Now it works great !  !    T.B.

  • Member since
    June, 2014
  • From: New Braunfels , Texas
Posted by Tanker - Builder on Thursday, November 03, 2016 6:48 AM

Don ;

 I don't know . My re-chargeable one had the battery totally get to the point it won't take a charge . It was a two speed . Now the battery is no longer available . So a new one is in the works .

   Heres a weird one . I found a very small pistol grip rechargeable drill that works as well as the good old Dremel . And it's only 4" long . It's made by the company that makes the Day-glo Green tools . ( I don't remember the name )  T.B.

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, November 03, 2016 9:17 AM

Tanker - Builder

Don ;

 I don't know . My re-chargeable one had the battery totally get to the point it won't take a charge . It was a two speed . Now the battery is no longer available . So a new one is in the works .

   Heres a weird one . I found a very small pistol grip rechargeable drill that works as well as the good old Dremel . And it's only 4" long . It's made by the company that makes the Day-glo Green tools . ( I don't remember the name )  T.B.

 

I would have liked to have picked up a hand grinder that was on the market briefly, but the company went belly up after a couple of months, before I got around to ordering one.  It was also about 4 inches long, but a straight body, that was small, about five eights inch or so in diameter, and very light.  Used either a single AA or double- forget which.  The only real problem with my battery Dremel is that it is kind of heavy for really small detail work with small bits.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September, 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, November 03, 2016 3:19 PM

You might want to contact Dremel's customer service and see if they can repair it.  They may offer to replace it for you.

The on/off switch wore out on my first Dremel.  I contacted their customer service, to see about getting it repaired, which they would have done, free of charge, by the way.  I would only have had to pay to ship it to them.  They wound up replacing it, because though it was the same model (a single-speed), the current version had been modified enough, that it couldn't be repaired.  They sent me the current version as a replacement, at no charge.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

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  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by Radial9 on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 6:04 AM

Great thread. Is my substantail investment in Dremel bits and accessories useable in a Foredom motor tool should I decide to purchase one?

Thanks!

  • Member since
    January, 2006
Posted by Paul Budzik on Wednesday, February 15, 2017 12:25 PM

[quote user="Radial9"]

Great thread. Is my substantail investment in Dremel bits and accessories useable in a Foredom motor tool should I decide to purchase one?

Thanks!

 /quote]

 

Yes, your Dremel bits should work.  Foredom also has a handpiece with a miniature 3 jaw chuck ...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mDsNVE299PE

Paul

  • Member since
    January, 2015
Posted by Radial9 on Thursday, February 16, 2017 2:14 PM

Paul... Thank you for the reply and for the link to a very informative video.

Cheers,

Bob

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