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looking at a new P&S camera ?

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  • Member since
    October, 2013
looking at a new P&S camera ?
Posted by infofrog on Sunday, December 03, 2017 12:52 PM

Before i start , I do have Nikon 3200 but it little old and just to big for my needs . 

I been looking at Panasonic's Lumix DMC-LX10 for my models and everyday  carry around camera . Plus it has WiFi to transfer photos to iphone . 

Any thoughts 

Thanks

Rick

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, December 03, 2017 1:16 PM

I'm going to say that the 3200 is actually better for shooting models. It has a 24 mp DX format CMOS sensor which despite it's age is still better than the 20 mp 1" MOS sensor on the Limux (the pixel count doesn't matter, the sensor size/pixel density matters). Additionally, you could add a dedicated DX format Micro Nikkor lens if you wanted to get close to your models. Camera size and weight doesn't matter to shoot models. it's sitting by your bench wating, not travelling with you. (Note I'm using an old, even bigger D300 with a big, heavy expensive Nikkor lens for the same silly purpose. I haven't carried it anywhere for over 5 years. All my expensive Nikkor FX glass gathers dust.

Now, that said, if you have the bug to buy a camera, this or any other comment will not stop you, and the Limux looks to be a fun carry around pocket camera. And I'm sure you'd have fun with it. And it would probably do a fine job on your model projects, too. 

You might want to check the specs for closest focusing distance on the Limux and compare it to the kit lens on your Nikon.

-Greg

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, December 04, 2017 8:56 AM

I find manual focus very important for shooting models (closeup work).  The autofocus algorithms these days, good for general shooting, are not adequate for closeup (macro) work.

I do have a compact camera that I use for occasional photography where I don't want to lug my SLR around, but for photographing my models, I will be shooting in house or backyard, so not much of a burden.  Electronic viewfinders do not have adquate resolution for good manual focus, and, as I say, algorithms not yet smart enough to use macro focusing tricks we have learned through the years (focus 1/3 back on model, etc).

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, December 04, 2017 12:46 PM

Good point by Don.

-Greg

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Wednesday, December 06, 2017 6:41 AM

Thank you all 

 

I like my Nikon 3200 it just big for everyday photo taken . Maybe the smartphone has caused me to rethink the size . I was looking at Pananisonic Lx10 small pocket with lens 1.4 or 2.8 . Plus it wifi to smartphone  I was think just upgrading my phone but at 1000 dollars for better camera . I just get better camera . 

Thanks 

Rick

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1299316-REG/panasonic_lumix_dmc_lx10_digital_camera.html

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Sunday, December 10, 2017 8:43 AM

Not too far back under this subject I did some comparisons between DSLRs vs Point and Shoot. The results were suprising. The really expensive Nikon D3x DSLR with specialty lenses really can shoot exceptional stuff. It's opponent was the P&S Nikon Coolpix P330. The P330 with its smaller sensor and resulting shorter lens resulted better depth of field and ease of operation. The added depth of field made the Nikon P330 a clear winner in the really close up and ease of operation tests. The DSLR with its big sensor and superior lenses will always win in most situations but in many cases a good P&S will meet the requirements and can be more practical.

Scary! Being a professional photographer and having almost unlimited Nikon gear I find myself using the Nikon P&S for almost all forum internet work. Pro work requires pro equipment but point and shoot meet almost all requirements for internet and monitors especially in work with extreme close up such as our Forum.

Technology is really moving along and the phones are starting to fill these niches.

I hope this helps. More info several posts back on this subject.

Max

PS--you 3200 guys have a camera that can cover 99% of all professional assignments. Hi-res with interchangeable lenses. Quite the camera and a good buy.

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Sunday, December 10, 2017 12:18 PM

I end up getting a Canon G7X Mark 2 . Do I enjoy this camera a lot . This will be my work horse camera. Plus its wifi . 

 

 

The Canon Reps were at the camera shop . I even got new hat . 

 

My first photo with it in auto mode and jpeg format . It has been switch to Raw and some setting fine tuned . i also got canon digital photo professional editor . I really like this editor . 

 

 

 

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, December 11, 2017 11:50 AM

I think you'll like that camera. Canon has been my go-to for P&S for years, and I've had several.

A quick comment, you mentioned switching to raw and tweaking some settings. Unless you know why you switched to raw and how you are going to process your pics, you will likely hate your new camera thinking it is taking "bad pictures". Also, all the settings you changed probably won't matter if shooting raw.

If you know all about a raw workflow, sorry about that. I'm just trying to save you from frustration that most folks get first time they decide to 'shoot raw'. (Idea: shoot jpeg+raw....that's what I always do with my Canon P&S's)

But hey, mostly have fun!! Your intro pic looks great.

-Greg

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Monday, December 11, 2017 5:16 PM

Greg

I think you'll like that camera. Canon has been my go-to for P&S for years, and I've had several.

A quick comment, you mentioned switching to raw and tweaking some settings. Unless you know why you switched to raw and how you are going to process your pics, you will likely hate your new camera thinking it is taking "bad pictures". Also, all the settings you changed probably won't matter if shooting raw.

If you know all about a raw workflow, sorry about that. I'm just trying to save you from frustration that most folks get first time they decide to 'shoot raw'. (Idea: shoot jpeg+raw....that's what I always do with my Canon P&S's)

But hey, mostly have fun!! Your intro pic looks great.

 

 

Thank you . I Switch it to Large jpeg  and raw . still learning . I thought the raw prodecced better pictures

The Nikon its set for Fine Jpeg 

Thanks again Rick 

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Monday, December 11, 2017 5:40 PM

My main setting I changed was the ISO to Max 2000. My Nikon after 1600 it gets grainy 

Rick 

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Monday, December 11, 2017 5:55 PM
Greg should I shoot in auto mode with the camera or leave it in A mode ? Thanks Rick

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Monday, December 11, 2017 8:01 PM

Hey Rick,

I reread my post, didn't mean to come off sounding like a know-it-all. Embarrassed

That said, I think it's great you switched to raw and large fine jpeg. You can always fall back on the jpg. In the meantime you can play with the raw files and learn if you want to. Yes 

I completely understand where you got the idea that raw "takes better pictures". It is a solid rumor, and what it really does is allow more versatility in editing. It's a fun process should you care to proceed and learn about it. For straight out of the camer, raw usually displays worse pictures and confuses the daylights out of camera owners.

Canon A vs Auto? I presume that is aperture mode vs Auto? Depends on what you are doing. Aperture mode is neat for shooting models because you control depth of field. But as you learn, it's quite ok to leave the camera in auto, jpeg, and switched to macro mode. 

I've been dabbling with cameras for going on 50 years and I still use auto mode more than I should probably admit. Embarrassed

Mostly, have fun with that new Canon, man!

PS, maybe Max or one of our other pros will pop in here. 

-Greg

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Monday, December 11, 2017 8:30 PM
Greg thanks for advice . My NIkon I used the aperture mode 90 percent . This camera I love it . Takes super great and fast pictures .plus I like WiFi to iPhone . I use a usb cord to transfer photo to pc Rick

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 9:30 AM

RAW va jpeg- here is my take.

RAW does have more dynamic range.  But this is only important if the scene you are photographing has a high contrast range.  Any indoor photography of models is unlikely to have high contrast scene.

RAW, because of the higher dynamic range does allow rescuing some bad exposures in post processing. If you are careful on your exposures, or bracket, this becomes less important.

I only use RAW if I am trying to expose a high contrast scene.

Also, RAW can have better color fidelity, since one of jpeg's compression schemes is to make two slightly different color areas the same color.  This is only important if you have a way to print color accurately- well calibrated monitor and printer. My monitor calibrated fine- I have never been able to calibrate the printer accurately, and the default color settings just do not give adequately accurate results :-(

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 11:52 AM

Don Stauffer

RAW va jpeg- here is my take.

RAW does have more dynamic range.  But this is only important if the scene you are photographing has a high contrast range.  Any indoor photography of models is unlikely to have high contrast scene.

RAW, because of the higher dynamic range does allow rescuing some bad exposures in post processing. If you are careful on your exposures, or bracket, this becomes less important.

I only use RAW if I am trying to expose a high contrast scene.

Also, RAW can have better color fidelity, since one of jpeg's compression schemes is to make two slightly different color areas the same color.  This is only important if you have a way to print color accurately- well calibrated monitor and printer. My monitor calibrated fine- I have never been able to calibrate the printer accurately, and the default color settings just do not give adequately accurate results :-(

 

 

 

thanks Don 

you and Greg have gave me great advice 

thanks again 

Rick 

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 11:57 AM

Hey Don, Greg and Rick. Max's take on the subject. The main difference between RAW and JPEG is the JPEG records how the camera controls are set whereas RAW records all possible settings at least in the range of the camera. JPEGs are difficult to make big changes in post processing. The RAW has many times the information recorded as JPEG and you have more to work with in post processing.

My wife is the real Photoshop expert person and I'm the shooter. I use the computer for final tuning and she does assembly, changes and final routing of work. I always shoot both RAW and JPEG and both work very well if you have the proper camera settings. JPEG when opened and put back in file is compressed slightly. Multiple trips back and forth can eventually degrade JPEG images. It's better to work with RAW or converted files on complicated projects where files are opened multiple times.

Hey, not the expert on the subject but we can get more info if needed from my wife. She did save me during the Film/Digital change over! I still owe her! lol.

Max

  • Member since
    May, 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 12:53 PM

A comment to Don if I may, a bit off topic to this thread....

Nobody calibrates printers, well, almost nobody. If your display is properly calibrated then I suspect the problem is related to your paper profiles.

Rick, if you're happily shooting away in aperture mode, you're probably ahead of 90% of the people who buy a dedicated camera. Yes

-Greg

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 7:11 PM

Will this completely replace my Dlsr no . But for my everyday use, Yes so much bettter than my Nikon Dlsr . 

My plan is to use Canon P&S for the build . Then Dlsr for my final over all shoots 

My Nikon I have Prime 50 lens . I love that lens but it the size .

This Canon fills my every day photos . One day the smartphones will completely take over . But for now the Canon takes much better photos than my Iphone . Plus I like the WIFI to smartphone . Also I like the feel of a camera , just like a real book to read .

Just got figure out the close up  shoots 

Here is photo of my Grand Daughter eating Chili . This is why I like this camera fast and easy 

Thanks everyone for the Help 

Rick 

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 9:26 AM

I certainly agree that the use of a compact camera is fine for everyday, non model photography.  Yesterday I bought my wife a new four hundred buck compact P&S for trips when she does not want to pack her camera bag with one of her dslrs and lenses.

However, for good model photography, it takes a good camera with at least aperture-preferred exposure, if not manual exposure, manual  focus, and a good way to see the focus.  To me, this means SLR. I do see the LCD screens on P&S cameras getting higher and higher resolution, but they are not there yet.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Wednesday, December 13, 2017 10:30 AM
What camera did you get Don . I know more I use this canon the more I love it . Rick

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, December 14, 2017 9:52 AM

infofrog
What camera did you get Don . I know more I use this canon the more I love it . Rick
 

Just bought the wife a Canon SX 370.  We had been sharing an old Olympus Coolpix.  The Canon sounds like a great compact, but we won't know for sure until after Christmas.  She has two Nikon DSLRs, lots of accessories, so I didn't know what to give her (she isn't into fancy clothes or jewelry).  So I talked her into a better small camera for trips she will be flying on, and wouldn't have to take her camera bag too.  She does pretty serious photography, so she needs a pretty good camera.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April, 2016
  • From: Parsons Kansas
Posted by Hodakamax on Thursday, December 14, 2017 5:06 PM

Looks to be a great camera Don. I'm A Nikon guy but Canon makes great stuff. In pro work these two are the best. Look out! You'll be borrowing your wife's camera after a test drive of close-up model photography with p&s, lol! Give us a report!

Max

  • Member since
    October, 2013
Posted by infofrog on Thursday, December 14, 2017 8:09 PM

Don that sounds like a great walk around camera . I bet she will love that camera .

I really love this Canon G7X . The WiFi is cats meow ., Rick

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, December 15, 2017 9:23 AM

Hodakamax

Looks to be a great camera Don. I'm A Nikon guy but Canon makes great stuff. In pro work these two are the best. Look out! You'll be borrowing your wife's camera after a test drive of close-up model photography with p&s, lol! Give us a report!

Max

 

Nah!  I keep my old Nikon D-40X just for model work.  I have a 3200 for general photo use and the a Nikon Coolpix P&S for a handy lightweight.

On the D-40X I use the kit lens, Nikon's 18-55 mm.  I have an old version, no image motion compensation, but who needs that when camera is on tripod.  Things I love about that lens is, it is close focus even on wide angle (18 mm), not just on the 55 end.  Using wide angle in model work gives a more realistic perspective (what all car advertisement photographers do).  And, that lens stops down to about f/30!

I also have a great closeup lens for it. It is an old Spiratone lens, a variable closeup lens, 1 to 10 diopters!  Can't use 10 in wide angle- get vignetting, but usually don't need wide angle with a really extreme closeup anyway.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

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