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Camera prices- new low!

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  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Camera prices- new low!
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, November 19, 2013 9:29 AM

Just saw an ad for a Canon Rebel DSLR yesterday from a major local camera retailer for $430 bucks!  I have always recommended DSLRs for model photography because of better focusing and control of depth of field.  The decreasing prices of DSLRs and the increasing price of compacts and ILCs are nice for the model photographer!  I'm a Nikon guy, but recognize there is little difference really between major brands, so this ad was good news!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Albany, NY
Posted by jeffpez on Tuesday, November 19, 2013 2:19 PM

I'm old enough to actually rememeber using film. I have an extensive collection of Canon lenses to go with one of their SLR cameras (A-1) and can't bring myself to start over no matter what the cost.

  • Member since
    October 2012
  • From: Mt. Washington, KY
Posted by Geezer on Monday, November 25, 2013 10:27 AM

I have a NIkon EM (remember those?) and Nikon N75 - both good film cameras. The lenses fit and can be used on my Nikon D5000 - just won't have the autofocus feature. Don't know about the Canon's though.

Dre
  • Member since
    June 2007
  • From: here, not over there
Posted by Dre on Monday, November 25, 2013 3:21 PM

Nikon is good for backwards compatibility regarding old lenses on new bodies.   But...  not all Nikon digital bodies will work with the old manual focus lens.   One reason I never switched to Canon when they had the edge in low-light sensitivity.

  • Member since
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  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, November 26, 2013 9:18 AM

I see ads now for Nikon 3100 matching that Canon price!

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
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  • From: Albany, NY
Posted by jeffpez on Wednesday, November 27, 2013 6:05 AM

If you're going to pull the trigger maybe you should wait for the post Christmas sales.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Illinois
Posted by wjbwjb29 on Friday, March 28, 2014 12:22 PM

The Nikon EM was my second camera and now I shoot with a Nikon D300.

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  • Member since
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  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Friday, March 28, 2014 1:26 PM

jeffpez

I'm old enough to actually rememeber using film. I have an extensive collection of Canon lenses to go with one of their SLR cameras (A-1) and can't bring myself to start over no matter what the cost.

Same here.........with the additional knowledge that the picture capturing computers-- that is what they are-- will be obsolete far quicker than the old film cameras.
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I really miss medium formatCrying
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, March 29, 2014 10:18 AM

Just remember that so-called digital cameras have an analog front end, and that is where the art is.  The processing starts with analog readout and amplification and then is converted from analog to digital for storage.

Of course, there are those who say that since photons are quantized, all photography including film is digital :-)

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
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  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Saturday, March 29, 2014 10:20 PM

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Computer, did we bring batteries?.....Computer?

  • Member since
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  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Sunday, March 30, 2014 8:34 AM

Don Stauffer

Just remember that so-called digital cameras have an analog front end, and that is where the art is.  The processing starts with analog readout and amplification and then is converted from analog to digital for storage.

Of course, there are those who say that since photons are quantized, all photography including film is digital :-)

True enough, but one major problem with digital equipment vs. film format is that the image size is constantly being increased as processors and circuit bus widths ( amount of digitized information able to be transmitted from the CCD sensors to the image processing circuits ) are improved as compared with data handling on the old film formats.
In film, the amount of information contained inside a frame was constant.
Improvements in lens coatings( if lens changes were possible ) and improved films made it possible to create photos that could compete with newer cameras.................so long as the skill of the photographer was equal.
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Storage and retrieval was also a constant as information stored on negatives was retrieved in the same manner for a century or more.
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Storage and data retrieval is now constantly changing depending on software and hardware improvements which means data stored today may not be accessible in twenty years, much less one hundred years.Hmm
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Granted, not all is bad.
Images can be viewed immediately ( no more Polaroid proofs !  Big Smile) and the days of wasted space are over as bad photos can be deleted rather than stored with good images.
Images can also be shared with far more people than before..................no slide projector needed.Whistling
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Some aspects of digital I like, some I don't.
Speaking as someone who has maintained computer systems since DOS ruled ( no main frames, though Whistling ) , staying on the "cutting edge " of digital imaging is going to be just as expensive in the long run as with computers.
Just my take on it.
  • Member since
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  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, April 2, 2014 9:37 AM

Indeed, all you need to see what is on a film negative is a good magnifier or microscope.  Those things are unlikely to go out of fashion!  And archivally treated monochrome negatives seem to last a long, long time (color not so good).  The digital storage problem is real.  Someone needs to continue to develop better long term storage- I understand even CDs and DVDs advertised as archival are not really that great.  My wife recently lost a lot of her photographs when she lost a hard drive and hadn't been diligent about backing them up to DVDs.  She recovered some from a photo hosting site, but still lost a bunch.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Wednesday, April 2, 2014 10:32 AM

Don Stauffer

................ archivally treated monochrome negatives seem to last a long, long time (color not so good).  The digital storage problem is real.  Someone needs to continue to develop better long term storage- I understand even CDs and DVDs advertised as archival are not really that great.  My wife recently lost a lot of her photographs when she lost a hard drive and hadn't been diligent about backing them up to DVDs.  She recovered some from a photo hosting site, but still lost a bunch.

I am sorry to hear of the loss of those photos.
You are correct that a solution to digital storage problems need to be solved as a lot of people are now taking digital photos.
Regarding archival storage of color photos......If I recall correctly, during the mid to late 19th century, a color process was invented which simultaneously exposed three different monochrome glass plate emulsions through three different color filters. The three images were combined to create a color image.
As I understand it, that process can create an archival image though I cannot recall the name of the process at this time,.Hmm
Dre
  • Member since
    June 2007
  • From: here, not over there
Posted by Dre on Friday, April 4, 2014 2:46 PM

While we might lose entire files due to an equipment malfunction, at least digitally stored files don't get scratched or smudged by dropping them on a darkroom floor.... or a film lab running your 4x5 color negs through the B/W line (yes, that actually happened to me and the lab blamed me for "ruining their lines").

Pretty much the only thing I miss from the film days is 35mm Ektar 25, a sadly short-lived emulsion.

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Friday, April 4, 2014 8:48 PM

Dre

Pretty much the only thing I miss from the film days is 35mm Ektar 25, a sadly short-lived emulsion.

I also miss Ektar 25.
The film made beautiful, sharp enlargements from that 35mm film.
Tags: Ektar
Dre
  • Member since
    June 2007
  • From: here, not over there
Posted by Dre on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 11:47 AM

Yep, that stuff had ridiculous sharpness and color.    

  • Member since
    March 2014
Posted by Tarasdad on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 6:24 PM

We have two Rebels available, an older XT and a T3i. Both take fantastic photographs. I do miss my old Minolta 35mm, but not the hassle of getting film developed. I did my own black and white but color or slides had to go to the lab.

Tarasdad

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Posted by waikong on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 12:55 PM

If you guys have lots of photos you can't afford to lose, please setup your computer with a 2nd hard drive that is mirrored, or in RAID 1.  This way when (its not if, its when) one of drive fails, you have a backup. To be perfectly safe, you back that up onto DVD or another hard drive somewhere else. If you really, really don't want to take any chances, make sure the backup is offsite.  I have everything backed up onto a 2nd drive on my computer, and then copied into a Network Attached Storage device that is mirrored. Yeah, takes some effort to do, but better safe than sorry

My website: http://waihobbies.wkhc.net

   

  • Member since
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  • From: Illinois: Hive of Scum and Villany
Posted by Sprue-ce Goose on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 12:59 PM

waikong

 To be perfectly safe, you back that up onto DVD or another hard drive somewhere else. 

When I worked IT......I couldn't believe that companies didn't do a better job of backing up data.Bang Head
OTOH...............their errors did provide me with plastic model kit money.........Hmm
  • Member since
    October 2011
Posted by modeler_zack on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:38 AM

I must be an odd ball here for the fact I prefer film over digital. I do own a canon rebel xt, in film I have a Pentax K1000 with the 50 f2.0 and 28 f2.8, canon Elan II with a sigma 70-300 and 50 1.4 "fantastic lens and worth every cent at $400.00", and to wrap things up my Yashica Electro 35G.  Film wise I shoot Ilford HP5 Plus traditional black and white, Fuji Superia 400 xtra and Velvia 100F "slide film" and Kodak Extar 100 "color print film thats saturated like slide". If you cant tell, photography is anoter hobby of mine. Oh, for black and white, I print and develop my own film and prints. I get the same joy from the smells of this hobby as I do in the darkroom with hints of sulphur and vinigar.

  • Member since
    October 2011
Posted by modeler_zack on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 6:47 AM

My apologies, the above post was intended for the "What do you shoot" thread.

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