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Home made PE

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  • Member since
    December, 2002
Home made PE
Posted by 7474 on Monday, October 02, 2017 11:05 PM

I'm thinking about doing some home made PE, but I just would like to use a thicker piece of brass and have the image not etch all the way through. Similar to having it engraved. Want to make a plaque for a model, but not sure if it's possible. 

  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 6:22 AM

Hello!

Sure it's possible - it's just the question of taking the metal out of the etching solution on time. And of course you have to protect the backside of the metal sheet with some kind of mask. Good luck with your undertaking and have a nice day

Paweł

 

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 9:29 AM

Here is a quick way to make a metal nameplate that looks like a photo-anodized one.

Prepare a piece of metal, say brass or aluminum- cut to size, clean or polish surface.  Then make a decal using clear inkjet decal paper, the size of your metal piece.  Use only two colors, black and white.  The white areas will not print at all, leaving clear decal in that area, the black area prints and looks like photo-anodize.

Usually it looks best with clear letters and black background, maybe with a clear rectange just inside of the plate edges.  Some graphics programs allow you to invert colors, so you can just type black letters on white background, then invert.  On simpler graphics programs, just set the background to black and the lettering to white.

One can also use blue and white- some photo-anodized plates used with aluminum use blue background with aluminum letters.

I have even made decal on metal plates that do simulate etched nameplates, by using thin gray lines on lettering and designs.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    December, 2002
Posted by 7474 on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 2:36 PM
Thanks Don and Pawel. Pawel, how much is the normal time for PE? I suppose that the time to etch is dependent upon the thickness? I need to protect every side that I don't want etched?
  • Member since
    May, 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 3:20 PM

7474 - normal time - that depends! On the stuff you use as etching agent, and then mainly on the temperature of the etching solution. I say put two pieces of mtal in the solution - one you working on and another, that has for example, a groove cut to half thickness. In the moment where you see the groove is etched all the way through, the other plate will be etched to half thickness. OK, that's not a professional method, but it could work for you. And yes, protect the side of the metal that should stay untouched. Otherwise the etching will continue on both sides, and that's not what we want, is it?

Hope it helps, have a nice day

Paweł

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Tuesday, October 03, 2017 4:33 PM

I dont know what chemicals you're using but when I use to etch stuff I used Archer brand etchent.It's used for electronics and it's cheep.....if you can find it. I use to get it at Radio Shack   ( does anybody remember Radio Shack?)

I used it to age metal roofing and Create pitting on exaust pipes  ect.

I "discovered"..... totally by accident..... that if you leave a part in for 30 seconds it disolves into nothing! 

Learn from my mistakes ! Take the part out before you count to 28 !!!!!

 

P.S.    Wear  gloves and a mask.......... trust me.

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    November, 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 9:09 AM

I have done a lot of circuit board etching- took about 30 minutes to etch through copper on board.  Did a little bit of etching, both photo resist and other resist, for models, and it took a similar amount of time.  I used ferric cloride, which is what most of the radio shack stuff is.  Never had anything etch faster than 10 to 15 minutes. I never heat the etchant, however- hot solution would act faster.

BTW, dry transfer etching acts as a resist, but probably the negative of what you want.  Using dry transfer lettering, you'd end up with the background etched, the letters bright and proud.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July, 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Wednesday, October 04, 2017 7:24 PM

Don Stauffer
I have done a lot of circuit board etching- took about 30 minutes to etch through copper on board. 

Don. Thank you for catching this.        I was NOT using Copper.

I was etching VERY thin  Tin ( Cambells corrugated steel siding ) and the exaust pipes were some sort of pot metal.

 The only time I etched anything in Copper was a practice run on a penny ( I mannaged to make a 1/25 scale wrench..... that I never figured out how to remove from the penny without destroying it. ) I don't remember how long it took. 20 min. sounds about right. 

                      Dont worry about the thumbprint... paint it rust and call it "Battle damage" !

  • Member since
    September, 2015
  • From: The Redwood Empire
Posted by Aaronw on Thursday, October 05, 2017 1:00 AM

Don Stauffer

Here is a quick way to make a metal nameplate that looks like a photo-anodized one.

Prepare a piece of metal, say brass or aluminum- cut to size, clean or polish surface.  Then make a decal using clear inkjet decal paper, the size of your metal piece.  Use only two colors, black and white.  The white areas will not print at all, leaving clear decal in that area, the black area prints and looks like photo-anodize.

Usually it looks best with clear letters and black background, maybe with a clear rectange just inside of the plate edges.  Some graphics programs allow you to invert colors, so you can just type black letters on white background, then invert.  On simpler graphics programs, just set the background to black and the lettering to white.

One can also use blue and white- some photo-anodized plates used with aluminum use blue background with aluminum letters.

I have even made decal on metal plates that do simulate etched nameplates, by using thin gray lines on lettering and designs.

 

 

 

 

That is a great idea for a spiffy looking name plate. I've considered putting a decal over a brass plate but it seems like it would look sort of cheap, but reversing the decal so the letters are brass could look really sharp. Thanks for the idea.

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