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Scratchbuilding, Who wants to do it?

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  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Scratchbuilding, Who wants to do it?
Posted by Woody on Friday, November 28, 2003 3:10 PM
I was wondering if anyone has ambitions to scratchbuild something and if so what? Is anyone out there working on a scratchbuilt project right now? If so what are you working on? I have a long time project that I'm think of starting again. A 1/72 F2G, started many years ago before there was a kit available. I have just barely started on a 1/1000 Botany Bay and would like to try my hand at the Kobiyashi Maru! Not everyone wants to scratchbuild but I think we can all learn a lot from those that do!

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 28, 2003 3:29 PM
Woody:
I scratchbuild ships, usually in wood but I'm well stuck into my first styrene ship, a 1:48 corvette.

Why?
Because the manufacturers don't make kits in my chosen subject and scale.

I do have some aircraft kits in 1:48 but again they are resin or vac-form because of the off beat subjects, so the kit bashing (scratchbuilding) is intensive.

As for the learning thing I am always flattered when someone comes back to me with the comment that my tip or whatever proved useful, and one main reason I joined this forum was to pick up on things the others are doing.

The keys to building from scratch is a good set of plans, patience and common sense. For many subjects, you'll have to work out your own plans. The satisfaction is unlike anything else in modeling when you have planned and engineered a successful model from nothing except bits of plastic sheet and assorted odds and ends.

I hope you pursue your builds, and please feel free to ask about things any time.

Reagrds,
Bruce


  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Friday, November 28, 2003 3:40 PM
Bruce,
I may just take you up on that! I started out carving my F2G in balsa that I then saturated in CA. I wanted it to be nonporous and strong so I could use it as a master for casting molds. Do you do anything like that to your wood models?

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Friday, November 28, 2003 3:46 PM
I'm working on a master of a Japanese Isuzu/Sumida K10 Type 93 Command Car (1/76). It's mostly sheet styrene, epoxy putty and superglue. Should be completed soon too.

It will be released at Trucks'n'Tracks in Feb next year.

Because of the work I do for a number of customers, I always have one or a few scratch projects on the go. But I must admit that many of the models I build for myself are scratch too... I've scratched over 200 patterns now, and for my own pleasure I have scratched Star Wars aliens, Looney Tune characters, dinosaurs, AFVs as well as a small number of WWI airplanes.
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Dahlonega, Georgia
Posted by lizardqing on Friday, November 28, 2003 3:51 PM
I am planning on an attempt at scratchbuilding one of the fire trucks in my dept. There is a very weak area in the market for fire apparatus and I would like to have a model of one that I get to run anyway. Just don't know when I'll start on one though.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 28, 2003 3:57 PM
I'm just starting to learn how to scratch build, so i'm starting off small.... roll cages, batteries fuel cells, and the like ..... as far as a whole vehichle, thats well off into the distance!!!
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Friday, November 28, 2003 4:05 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by djmodels1999

I'm working on a master of a Japanese Isuzu/Sumida K10 Type 93 Command Car (1/76). It's mostly sheet styrene, epoxy putty and superglue. Should be completed soon too.

It will be released at Trucks'n'Tracks in Feb next year.

Because of the work I do for a number of customers, I always have one or a few scratch projects on the go. But I must admit that many of the models I build for myself are scratch too... I've scratched over 200 patterns now, and for my own pleasure I have scratched Star Wars aliens, Looney Tune characters, dinosaurs, AFVs as well as a small number of WWI airplanes.
Do you have a site that your work can be viewed at? I sure hope so! Do you use any mills or lathes in your work?

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    January 2003
Posted by shermanfreak on Friday, November 28, 2003 6:01 PM
I'd like to kick my butt in gear and scratchbuild a Sherman BARV upper hull. I'm close to having all the references I need now, so maybe in the new year I'll get started.
Happy Modelling and God Bless Robert
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Friday, November 28, 2003 6:31 PM
Hey djmodels, I just came back from your site, very nice! Wink [;)]

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Philippines
Posted by Dwight Ta-ala on Friday, November 28, 2003 6:52 PM
We scratch build mostly not because we wanted to but because we have to. I have scratch-built a viking ship in my teenage days out of wood and plastic.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 28, 2003 7:53 PM
I scrathbuild fishing rods does that count?Wink [;)] LOL

On a more serious note though...I want to scracthbuilt but Im skeered! LOL Well not really...Ive done a few things roll cages exhaust...fuel cells but nothing big! While not big Im planning on scratchbuilding some odds and ends for my garage scene...Tables maybe a few storage shelves and a tool cart or 2....Some of it I have ordered but once I saw it, I thought I think I could do that!....We'll see
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 28, 2003 8:01 PM
let us know how it turns out chris!!!
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Friday, November 28, 2003 9:10 PM
Chris you should Scratchbuild a model of that saltwater canoe you showed me! Tongue [:P]Tongue [:P]Tongue [:P]Laugh [(-D] Pirate [oX)]

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, November 28, 2003 9:24 PM
I would love to find some pleasure craft kits....even posted a thread about it a while back in the Ship forum...as far as scratchbuilding one...well dont hold your breath as Im not holding mine! LOL
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by SNOOPY on Friday, November 28, 2003 11:16 PM
I have always been interested in scratchbuilding but I never really know where to begin. My uncle served on the USS Quincy (CA-71) and they do not make a model of this, well I could get one now of the USS Baltimore but this was before there was a Baltimore Class out there. I also would not mind building the USS Texas. I also saw an article in FSM about 4 years ago about scratch building an Albatross D.III (I think). I just do not know how or where to begin. I probably need to actually get confidence in building period.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 7:09 AM
Snoopy...I suffer the same problem in a way lack of confidence in my ability and often not knowing where to start...Heres what I did I started small. Im still occasionally building small scratchbuilt items....Such as what I mentioned above....my first was a fuel cell for a nascar model years ago....now I cant seem to recall how or whaat I used that made it work so well! DOH! Then I tried some custom exhausts made out of Evergreen tubing and small brass and aluminum tubing.....then I moved on to roll cages...but thats it so far.

If I might offer a suggestion find something small on the ship that might need to be built....take a good look at it come up with a set of plans(really simple ones work the best for me) make a quick sketch and then select your materials.....
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Saturday, November 29, 2003 7:42 AM
Woody,

No, I do not have a lathe... I'd like too, but those tools are still a bit expensive! Most of the patterns I do only require a single or two wheels at most so I can still 'get by' with modifying existing wheels from various kits, or sometimes make my own. Barrels are a pain too, but I do often use the tappered handles of old brushes for that...

My first scratch was actually an biplane, an Aviatik D.I, whose drawings I had found in a French mag. The author described how to do the model, with drawings showing the various parts required. Putty did the rest! I was 18 then. AFVs are normally easier to scratch, provided you can find wheels and tracks to re-use. The easiest project was the Dorchester armoured truck used by the Brits (and the Germans!) in North Africa during WWII. The chassis and wheels came from an Airfix Mtador kit.

My most difficult scratch? The Ilya Murometz Russian bomber of 1917, although what made it difficult was really the size of the wings (tended to droop!) and the staggering amount of sprue I used to complete the wiring! The masters of the Citroen Traction-Avant I did for Scale Link (1/87) and those of the Simca 5 staff car I did for SMA (1/76) and Fine Scale Factory (1/72) were the hardest built because they are so 'curvy' all over... I used plastic to create a 'skeleton' or a frame and built up and kind of sculpted the bodies over the 'skeleton' with Milliput and super-glue. The completed patterns were probably 85% Milliput, 5% plastic and 10% hardened super-glue.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Saturday, November 29, 2003 10:25 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by HistoryinScale

I scrathbuild fishing rods does that count?Wink [;)] LOL


I'll bet you don't build the blank! Big Smile [:D]Wink [;)]

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 10:43 AM
I will soon be starting my first sctratch project, a new turret for my Tamiya Panther A. Follow my progress (or lack of) in the armor forum!
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Saturday, November 29, 2003 12:21 PM
Good luck to you, Derek.

Does that mean you'll replace that Pz IV turret in your signature too..??! LOL

By the way, where there many of those Panther/Pz IV..? Any other info you'd care to pass on..?

Domi
  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by animal on Saturday, November 29, 2003 1:00 PM
Just about everything I build is scratchbuilt or drasticly kit bashed and scratch. This is due to the fact that there is no kits available.in my chosen subjects(Vietnam Era) Also because I have got to feed myself more challenging projects. Sometimes I will build OOB, but I find myself getting bored with it and then I will start to research the model and you know where this leads too. My $15.00 models becaomes a $60.00 one with after market parts. It is cheaper to scratch the parts.
Animal wants trucks!!! http://community.webshots.com/user/gtadw
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Central Ohio
Posted by Ashley on Saturday, November 29, 2003 1:42 PM
I scratchbuild quite a bit. Right now, there is a 1/16th scale Pitts S2B under construction, soldered brass rod fuselage structure, wooden rib-and-spar wings covered in heat-shrink covering. Also doing a 1/24th Aeronca 7AC in the same medium. It is actually a lot of fun.

Have you flown a Ford lately?

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 3:51 PM
Got me there Mike! Nope sure dont build the blanks....I get mine from Fenwick,St.Croix,All star just to name a few.....
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Saturday, November 29, 2003 4:15 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by djmodels1999

Woody,

No, I do not have a lathe... I'd like too, but those tools are still a bit expensive! Most of the patterns I do only require a single or two wheels at most so I can still 'get by' with modifying existing wheels from various kits, or sometimes make my own. Barrels are a pain too, but I do often use the tappered handles of old brushes for that...

What if I told you there was a mill & lathe combo package for under $400 ! Check it out here http://www.clisby.com.au/ Doesn't look like a toy either!

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: UK
Posted by gregers on Saturday, November 29, 2003 4:29 PM
Hi Woody, i have been plucking up the courage to start a scrachbuild of a comper swift in 1/72 (odd subject i know but its a pretty little aircraft) the plans are in a book that i have but they are in 1/48th but that wont be a problem.
Greg
Why torture yourself when life will do it for you?
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Saturday, November 29, 2003 4:42 PM
Hey Greg, Are you building the inline or radial engine version? By the way I'm sorry I haven't sent out your package yet. De got very sick and eventually ended up in the hospital. She is feeling much better now and has come home. I haven't forgotten about you I promise! Wink [;)]

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 8:11 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Woody

Bruce,
I may just take you up on that! I started out carving my F2G in balsa that I then saturated in CA. I wanted it to be nonporous and strong so I could use it as a master for casting molds. Do you do anything like that to your wood models?

Hi Woody:
As you can see from all the replies there are lots of resources here to reach out to, so I hope this gives you and some of the others the needed confidence to go ahead.

Regarding the balsa wood, I will be doing something like that to reinforce the vac form wings in my 1:48 Halifax kit, but right now I'm concentrating on the ship.

BTW, there is a product out there in hardware stores called Sanding Sealer which is specifically designed to close the grain in wood. Won't be quite as strong as your CA bath, but it would probably be cheaper if you do this a lot.

My models are all one-off, so I just build the part rather than making a mold. For items that I need a few of I'll make a wooden or metal master and then cast what I need. For things like ship's rigging blocks I just sit in front of the TV for a couple of nights and turn them out from wood blanks.

For the wooden ships I usually use softwood to make keels and bulkheads and then plank with hardwood strips. This similar method I'm doing now in styrene is turning into a bit of an adventure, but so far I like the results.

Good luck with your build,
Bruce
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 8:38 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by djmodels1999

Good luck to you, Derek.

Does that mean you'll replace that Pz IV turret in your signature too..??! LOL

By the way, where there many of those Panther/Pz IV..? Any other info you'd care to pass on..?

Domi

If everything turns out right my Panther with correct turet will be in my sig. Big Smile [:D]
To my knowledge very few (Possibly only one) of the Pz IV/Panther D hybreds were built. They had no turret traverse (Bolted on.) and were used as command vehicles on the eastern front. I have more info but can't remember the particulars right now.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, November 29, 2003 9:33 PM
Hey Woody,

I just found those Clisby lathes/mills the other day myself. I did a bit of research and it's tough to find anything wrong with them. I am SERIOUSLY thinking of ordering from them. The price is SO right and they'd do anything I would need for model building.

Personally, I'd like to try scratch-building a modern chopper (bike) like they seem to be showing all over TV these days (someone else posted one on here a while back). Other than that, it's just the odd component here and there...

Murray
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Saturday, November 29, 2003 9:49 PM
Hey Murray, They look like great tools don't they! There is supposed to be a CNC conversion available from the US distributor. As a side note Mr Clisby is the Fellow who designed the Sherline lathes!
Here is a picture of my F2G. This is still very early in the shaping proccess but the basic shape is there.

Let me know what you think.

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
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