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How do you achieve your gloss coat (products, methods and drying times)?

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  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
How do you achieve your gloss coat (products, methods and drying times)?
Posted by ohms on Monday, April 11, 2022 4:03 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I noticed that there are many different methods on YouTube on how to achieve a gloss (mirror) finish. I was wondering if anyone wanted to share theirs. Do you thin your gloss? Do you use urethane? What sandpaper grits do you use after applying the coats? Wet or dry? How long do you wait between each coat?

 

I'm guessing I'm asking for a lot of typing, but I'd really appreciate any and all feedback. Want to try several methods through R&D.

 

Thanks.

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Monday, April 11, 2022 1:26 PM

The best bet is to post this question in the Airbrushing and Painting Forum down below in the Tools, Techniques, and Reference Materials section.  I'll give you suggestions, but that subject has many threads in that forum.

There are two major forms of paints, flats and gloss ( and a few semi-gloss colors).  In general enamels and lacquers produce the gloss sheen than acrylics, but there are gloss acrylics.  It is just harder to get a really shiny gloss with them.

One can also find clear gloss finishes to spray over flat paints.  But these may result in too shiny of a color (the wet look).  This is fine for twenty first century cars, and custom cars and rods.  It is also too glossy for airliners.  Gloss paints can be applied wetter than flats to get a sheen.  You can put on a thinner coat first to help adhesion and then follow with the wet coat later.  While lacquers give you a glossy finish, you may need to polish the finish.  Regular car polish works fine, but you can get polishes specifically for model paints.  I find it difficult to polish enamels or acrylics, but some people can do it.

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Monday, April 11, 2022 2:12 PM

I like Future acrylic floor wax thinned 50% with isopropyl alcohol.  Sprays nice, self levels and doesn't interact with other paints.

This 737 is finished with Future

Recently I tried urethan for the first time and was pretty pleased.  It's very shiny and I'll use it mostly on car models.  This Mach 5 was my first urethan experiment

 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: South Africa
Posted by ohms on Monday, April 11, 2022 2:13 PM

Thanks for the feedback. Didn't check first to see if there was a 'techniques' section, so I apologize for that. 

 

Can I copy and paste my text over to that section, or will the moderators have a problem with that?

Into model building since September 2019. Also into books (mostly science-fiction), comic books, and gaming.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, April 14, 2022 11:58 AM

ohms

Thanks for the feedback. Didn't check first to see if there was a 'techniques' section, so I apologize for that.  

Can I copy and paste my text over to that section, or will the moderators have a problem with that? 

No need to apologize!  It's a hobby forum, so we're relaxed and having fun!

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

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