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rotating and sliding parts

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  • Member since
    April 2021
  • From: Iron Mountain Michigan USA
rotating and sliding parts
Posted by LudwigVonMech on Sunday, April 17, 2022 10:43 PM

On rotating parts, like wheels and axels, what can be applied to the friction surfaces to keep liquid plastic cement from bonding all the parts together so the wheels turn or the hinges swing? Vasoline kinda works, but not well. 

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Sunday, April 17, 2022 10:58 PM

Honestly speaking, try using a bit less glue. I know that sounds kind of simplistic, but the fact of the matter is that you can't apply any glue to the 'movable' parts, so use less so it will not seep by capillary action into the place you don't want it. Any place where two pieces are in close proximity will promote capillary action. thus, you have to either use less glue, or separate the parts more.

The alternative is, use a thicker glue at that point.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Monday, April 18, 2022 5:59 AM

Regular machine oils like 3 in 1 are fine, as is butter, salad oil, cooking oil, liquid hand soap.

On problem with shafts and bearings is that the molding process often does not usually make round shafts nor round holes.  You may need to sand shafts round, and use the correct drill to round out bearings (holes).

 

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Monday, April 18, 2022 11:54 AM

 Be careful using petroleum products, it reduces over time and will distill out and soften surrounding plastic. Dry graphite might be a better solution as well as Don's suggestions. Unless your models are "played" with graphite won't wear down the contact points.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Monday, April 18, 2022 12:14 PM

Once I finish a model I dont need to have any rotating or moving parts,it sits on its shelf,the less I touch it the less problems.Im not turning wheels,spinning propellers,rotatating turrets or opening doors and hatches.

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, April 18, 2022 3:09 PM

Tojo72

Once I finish a model I dont need to have any rotating or moving parts,it sits on its shelf,the less I touch it the less problems.Im not turning wheels,spinning propellers,rotatating turrets or opening doors and hatches.

 

I agree with you 100%. I would like to add one more item to your list: I NEVER turn my models upside down. That is a recipe for a disaster, such as breaking guns and landing gear. Worse yet, losing your grip and dropping the model.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Monday, April 18, 2022 10:25 PM

Vegtable oil is safe and will not degrade the plastic over time like a petroleum might.

I remember reading this in the instructions of an old school model with operating parts. I think the motorized Lindberg M46 Patton tank.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 7:33 AM

KY Jelly, a water-based lubricant

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 3:54 PM

Hi;

 Now this is a good question.The truth? The best way I have found is to do this. When you want to have moveable parts.Take the parts and make sure they fit well and there is NO binding. Then At Assembly take a Pindrop of tube glue or C.A. glue and carefully unite the parts. After that , then use the liquid glue.The Dried tube or C.A. act like a dam. As far as lubrication I use Model railroad Lubricants or that developed for R.C. Models.No Problems ever. 

  • Member since
    April 2021
  • From: Iron Mountain Michigan USA
Posted by LudwigVonMech on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 4:37 PM

Tojo72

Once I finish a model I dont need to have any rotating or moving parts,it sits on its shelf,the less I touch it the less problems.Im not turning wheels,spinning propellers,rotatating turrets or opening doors and hatches.

 

I see what you are stepping in, and that is OK. However, I prefer to have more dynamic displays that can be changed up, and I really like it when the wheels and tracks move. 
  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 4:43 PM

I respect all of your opinions, but I really hesitate getting anything petrol based near styrene. 

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    July 2012
  • From: Douglas AZ
Posted by littletimmy on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 7:25 PM

I'm with Armornut,...

Graphite powder is safe for plastic, but use it sparingly. ( it usually comes in a squeeze bottle, and if you have HULK hands like me one "puff" goes EVERYWHERE! )

ALSO: Labelle oil for plastic gears works well. Something I learned building model trains.

DO  N O T  USE BUTTER !!!!

Somebody suggested this to me 40 years ago..... and I'm still trying to clean that mess out of one of my locomotives !!!

And, as for vegetable oil,  it tends to grab any dust in the air. So after a few years, your model may have scale "dust bunnys" ... ( ask me how I know ...)

 

 

 

 Dont worry about the thumbprint, paint it Rust , and call it "Battle Damage"

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Tuesday, April 19, 2022 9:41 PM

 A cleaner way to apply graphite would be to decant into a small cup/basin and then rubit on with a sponge applicator. May keep the puff from adding weathering.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, April 20, 2022 6:13 AM

Another way to approach this for rotating parts is a little modification and adding brass rods as axles, and then you can use microminiature bearings.  I have found those as small as 1mm ID, and they're actual bearings and not just sleeves that call themselves that.  Poly caps that you can get for Gundam models also work really well, without using lubricants.  

I agree with the warnings about petroleum-based lubricants like machine oils on plastic, especially in the case of using them on parts made of clear polycarbonate.  The errors of that approach would show themselves in hours with tiny cracks and could even cause it to shatter.

Graphite powder (I use 5 micron graphite powder in a jar) not only makes a great lubricant, but also makes good gun smoke, as well as adding kind of a "clean metal" look to the edges of simulated metal parts to simulate wear between metal components that slide over each other, like the individual feathers of an afterburner cone.  Definitely a must-have in your toolkit.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Thursday, April 21, 2022 6:29 PM

Hello!

While I don't need to have all parts moving on my model, there are times when I find it at least handy. One thing are propellers - I always like to have them turning - it helps to save them from damage. It gives the prop blades a chance of turning instead of breaking, if you know what I mean. Plus at leas once, long time ago I had my pops trying to turn a prop that was non turning... You should have seen that roll my model made then... And my favourite solution here are the poly caps like the way Hasegawa does it - not only leaves the prop turning, but it is also removable and most importantly can be painted and detailed separately and added to the model as the last step - very handy.

Right now I'm working on a Cobra (1:72, Special Hobby) - and they mean to glue the main rotor in place - this kinda feels wrong to me, now I'm scratching my head to convert it. It would be best to not only have it turning, but also removable for transport - that could help prevent damage. Let's see what I can do.

Thanks for reading and have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

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