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Removing paint from a completed model

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  • Member since
    September 2019
Removing paint from a completed model
Posted by Top2MP on Sunday, November 26, 2023 3:41 PM

I have a completed Mazda RX — 7RI that I dislike the color to. How do I strip all of that paint off the model ?

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Valrico, FL
Posted by HeavyArty on Monday, November 27, 2023 11:16 AM

First, you will need to disassemble it and just strip the body.  To do so, spray it liberally with Easy-Off oven cleaner and seal it up in a zip-loc baggie.  Let is sit a day or two, then take it out of the bag and the paint should be gone or really soft.  You should be able to wash off the rest, but may need to scrub it with a toothbrush to get it out of tight spots.  Alternatley, you can soak it in ammonia (esp. if acrylic paint) or brake fluid (enamel paint).  Don't use any type of solvent though (i.e.: lacquer thinner, paint thinner, etc.) or you will end up with a melted blob of plastic.

Gino P. Quintiliani - Field Artillery - The KING of BATTLE!!!

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"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell

fox
  • Member since
    January 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Monday, November 27, 2023 12:03 PM

Work safely! Wear gloves. 

Stay safe.

Jim Captain

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench: Artesania Latina  (aka) Artists in the Latrine 1/75 Bluenose II

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, November 27, 2023 2:12 PM

Use Isopropyl Alcohol and a cheap electric toothbrush.  Much safer for you and the plastic in your model.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Valrico, FL
Posted by HeavyArty on Monday, November 27, 2023 2:27 PM

Isopropyl alcohol only works on acrylic paints.  If it is enamels, go with what I described above.  None of the above methods will harm the plastic.

Gino P. Quintiliani - Field Artillery - The KING of BATTLE!!!

Check out my Gallery: https://app.photobucket.com/u/HeavyArty

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, November 27, 2023 2:58 PM

Not true.  It works on enamels, lacquers...pretty much any model paint.  I only post the methods I have used myself.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Valrico, FL
Posted by HeavyArty on Monday, November 27, 2023 6:21 PM

I don't know what kind of alcohol you have, but what I have used doesn't do anything to Teasors Model Master enamals.

Gino P. Quintiliani - Field Artillery - The KING of BATTLE!!!

Check out my Gallery: https://app.photobucket.com/u/HeavyArty

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf." -- George Orwell

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, November 27, 2023 7:09 PM

I have used isopropyl alcohol in concentrations from 70% up to 99%, and they all work, even on Model Master enamels.  The lower concentrations just take a little longer.  I'm right in the middle of stripping a combination of Testors enamel, MCW enamel, MCW lacquer, and Tamiya Surface Primer.  Had to do that after finally figuring out the right color of silver to use for the stripes on a Boss 351 Mustang build I'm doing.  Tried to fix it, but just decided to strip it and start over again.  Its been in the bath for a little over 2 hours now and I have given it an occasional 2 or 3 minute scrubbing with a cheap electric toothbrush, and there's only a little bit of paint/primer left on it.  I'll come back to it tomorrow and scrub just a little more, and it'll be like the part was never painted.  I have been using it for years as my go-to for removing paint when a new painting idea doesn't go as planned.  Even took off 25 year old Model Master white enamel and the real, old-fashioned, aircraft grade zinc chromate primer I used underneath it.  It is quick, effective, and safe.  Tried Easy Off once, and it was also effective, but it turned the plastic of the 1/32 Hasegawa F-16 intake tube I was trying to strip into a really brittle piece of plastic.  As soon as I started flexing that part to work the seams on it a little better, it broke into 5 or 6 pieces.  That plastic wasn't brittle before that.  Also wasn't crazy about the fumes or what could possibly happen if a little bit of it splattered and got in my eyes...so I went looking for a better way.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    September 2017
  • From: Roanoke Virginia
Posted by Strongeagle on Monday, November 27, 2023 8:20 PM

Top2MP

I have a completed Mazda RX — 7RI that I dislike the color to. How do I strip all of that paint off the model ?

 

My "go-to" stripping agent for acrylic or enamel painted models is denatured alcohol that I buy a gallon at a time at Lowes.  Denatured alcohol is ethyl alcohol with an additive to make it un-drinkable. The most common additive is 5-10% methanol.

It's great for deep-cleaning airbrushes too.  If you have an untrasonic cleaner, use that too with the alcohol.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Tuesday, November 28, 2023 6:27 AM

I bought a bottle of StripSafe, made by StripWell at a model show.  StripWell is used in the furniture refinishing  business.  StripSafe says it will remove acrylic, enamel, and lacquers.  It is not  a strong caustic like oven cleaner or an alcohol/solvent type material - safe to handle & have flames around.

I have found it to be an effective remover for hobby paints.  A brief soak in StripSafe removes paints from plastic.  CA was not affected.  I did have a problem with an overnight soak on a 3D resin ship hull - it warped.  I think that was operator error

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Tuesday, November 28, 2023 8:37 AM

Purple Power detergent works well for removing paint.  I used to buy it in the small spray bottles, but now find I can buy it in gallon bottles for not much more than the spray bottles (which are reusable).

 

  • Member since
    September 2019
Posted by Top2MP on Wednesday, November 29, 2023 3:25 PM

Thanks everyone for the good advice.  I remember soaking parts in Simple Green one time.  It worked also.

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Friday, December 1, 2023 7:00 AM

This is a Sticky thing!

     I use Easy Off! Always have. Simple Green was a waste for removing paint and chrome in my opinion .The Alcohol is alright IF the model has been painted with acrylics, but, how can you know?

   Do a test patch on an area you can cover later. The thing is, some of what's been recommended left me with sticky surfaces that ONLY Dawn-FULL STRENGTH and Alcohol washes afterward would cure. So be careful!

 Wear safety glasses and gloves. ALWAYS !!!

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, December 1, 2023 9:31 AM

Tanker-Builder

This is a Sticky thing!

     I use Easy Off! Always have. Simple Green was a waste for removing paint and chrome in my opinion .The Alcohol is alright IF the model has been painted with acrylics, but, how can you know?

Again, that is not true about alcohol only removing acrylics.  That's why I went into the detail that I did in my previous post.  Bang Head  My Mustang hood with Tamiya Surface Primer, MCW enamel, MCW lacquer, and Testors square bottle enamel...all fully cured...is now a nice, bare, clean piece of white plastic again...just isopropyl alcohol and a cheap electric toothbrush.  No toxic fumes and no caustic chemicals that make styrene brittle.  Tried the Purple Power I have just to see what it would do, since I'm always happy to try new things.  It didn't even touch the stuff.  In fact, I think it made all of the paint harder.  Its great for de-chroming chrome parts though...whereas my isopropyl doesn't do a thing to it.  Different methods for different things I guess.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: UK
Posted by PatW on Wednesday, December 6, 2023 2:03 PM

I sometimes use a drop of brake fluid brushhed on.

Remember , common sense is not common.

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