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black primer

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  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by Tinker on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 4:44 AM
The Suede paint jobs rodders use is achieved by shooting a coat of clear primer/sealer over the primer paint. That not only gives the color a soft, satin looke, but also seals out moisture. Moisture will go through lacquer-based primers and eventually cause rust to form under the paint. On your model, after the primer coat is on and thouroughly dry, color sand with a very fine grit paper ( perhaps 1000 grit ) and water. That will produce a smooth surface. After the body is completely dry of moisture, spray on a light-to-medium coat of flat clear ; let that dry for a couple of days, then buff with a soft dry cloth. That should give you the "scale " suede shiine. Good luck. ( I think that , with this second update, my suggestions are more readable and flow better )
" 'Polls' are surveys of uninformed people who think it's possible to get the answer wrong." ...Ann Coulter
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 12, 2003 3:58 PM
Those suggestions are all very good I am sure even though I have never tried them. I model probably 50% of the cars I build in suede finishes. I came across this method by accident when I first began using an airbrush. I find the proper look is achieved with a flat black base, or which ever color you desire. I spray from a bit further away and use higher air pressure than normal, 25-30 p.s.i. I try to achieve a finish that makes the model look dusty. And I mean dusty, it should look like it has been sitting on a shelf for a year, only the dust will be the color desired for the car. The model should look like it has dry paint overspray on it. Then take super fine sandpaper and sand the entire model. I don't know which grit to use, but Testors makes a sandpaper assortment pack and the 2 finest grits work great, the red and the tan papers, I believe. This makes a finish which is to the eye is clearly flat but there is a hint of shine on the curves of the model, just like a real suede paint job. It also acentuates panel lines because some of the darker paint "dust" is left in small recesses, similar to a wash. It makes for a great finish unless it is on an FA-18 Hornet, which is where I first discovered this method. Happy modeling.Cool [8D]
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 6, 2003 1:41 PM
I'm going to look for some of the Floquil that Big Jake recommends, but you might also want to just try adding some Future to an acrylic Flat Black? I have no idea what ratio to use, so you'd have to experiment, but it might be the easiest solution if you don't have access to Floquil paints.

M.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Lacombe, LA.
Posted by Big Jake on Thursday, February 6, 2003 1:10 AM
Look for a product called "Floquil Steam Power Black", it is a perfect water base tough as nails paint about $4.00 a bottle but it is the best semi gloss black I've ever seen it is EXACTLY what you are looking for, I promise. I used it on all underhood black applications and it is a perfect match for the primer you want.

Big Jake

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 5, 2003 9:42 PM
if you prime the model with hobby paint you should be able to use automobile paints without ruining the model
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Upper left side of the lower Penninsula of Mich
Posted by dkmacin on Wednesday, February 5, 2003 7:07 PM
Krylon makes a satin black primer, This may be what you are looking for.
I saw it today at Wal-Mart.

Don
I know it's only rock and roll, but I like it.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, January 26, 2003 6:03 PM
Tamiya makes a semi-gloss black that may be just what you are looking for. I hope you can find a supplier where you are. It is TS-29 semi-gloss black.

HTH,
Mark
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, December 31, 2002 12:05 AM
If you have an airbrush you might try a 50/50 mix of flat and satin black. That should give you the finish you are looking for
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 26, 2002 6:32 PM
Hello, I am out here in Hawaii and I might have the answer to your help topic. I have used actual automotive paints and primers, but when you use it, make sure that when painting, you spray just a light fine mist on your model and maybe have to use two to three coats,(make sure it is a fine misting when you spray) or else otherwise it will run or clump up. After a thourogh drying you might have to lightly wet sand with a 800 or higher grit sand paper.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 21, 2002 4:26 PM
I,ve tried flat black but it doesn't have the right finish. Black primer (or suede as the hot rodders call it) has almost a shiny (but not quite) quality to it. Know what I mean?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 21, 2002 2:55 PM
flat black??
  • Member since
    November 2005
black primer
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 21, 2002 12:17 PM
My current project is a 1/24th scale '34 Ford pickup rod done fifties style. I would like to finish it in black primer with small flames or scallops. Does anyone have suggestions as to what to use for primer? I can't find any made by Testors, Tamiya etc.... I'd like to stay away from automotive products if possible, but I'll use them if I have to. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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