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What level is the amt Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit?

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  • Member since
    February 2016
What level is the amt Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit?
Posted by JonBailey on Sunday, September 18, 2022 10:36 AM

A customer from amazon.com asked me a product question about this 1/25 truck model kit. I just got an email from amazon.com customer reviews as follows:

 

As an reviewer of AMT Kenworth W925..., can you help this fellow customer?

 
AMT Kenworth W925 Conventional 1:25 Scale Model Kit

"What level is it?"

 

Kellen N. asked

 

 

So, I answered Kellan by saying, "What level? About two steps up to the seat of the high cab for a commanding view of the road!" 

Current Model Worked On; 1/25 AMT Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit, Future Models; 1/25 AMT Wilson Cattle Trailer, 1/96 Atlantis Boeing 727, 1/48 AMT Bell 205 Helicopter

  • Member since
    May 2022
Posted by Eugene Rowe on Sunday, September 18, 2022 10:46 AM

The AMT truck kits can be tricky and some kits do not have part numbers molded onto the sprues so I would say level 3 or 4.

  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by JonBailey on Sunday, September 18, 2022 11:33 AM

Many parts also do not have pegs or tabs to fit into holes or slots. Some parts don't fit together nicely. Some body parts have pitting in the plastic. Vinyl tires fit wheels too loose. Back in the day, genuine rubber tires were the best for model kits. Firm, tight elastic material the black rubber was and it stretches and shrinks to conform well to rims. Plastic molding is not the most precise I have ever seen. Revell, Atlantis and Monogram are molded with greater precision. 

 

I was just giving a smart-*** answer to the amazon.com question asker.

Current Model Worked On; 1/25 AMT Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit, Future Models; 1/25 AMT Wilson Cattle Trailer, 1/96 Atlantis Boeing 727, 1/48 AMT Bell 205 Helicopter

  • Member since
    May 2022
Posted by Eugene Rowe on Sunday, September 18, 2022 11:50 AM

The Revell Pete 359 is a nice kit!  

  • Member since
    February 2016
Posted by JonBailey on Sunday, September 18, 2022 12:46 PM

Rubber tires?

Current Model Worked On; 1/25 AMT Kenworth W-925 Tractor Kit, Future Models; 1/25 AMT Wilson Cattle Trailer, 1/96 Atlantis Boeing 727, 1/48 AMT Bell 205 Helicopter

  • Member since
    May 2022
Posted by Eugene Rowe on Sunday, September 18, 2022 12:58 PM

Yep

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, September 18, 2022 1:29 PM

I'd call it level 4.

The model kit is from 1971, about 50 years ago, before models had skill levels, although this one was recommended for ages 12 through adult.

Obviously, lower skill levels are easier. Level 1 is normally fewer parts and no paint or cement required. Usually preprinted markings or peel and stick stickers.

Level 2 are more parts, require paint and glue as well as water slide decals.

Level 3 are usually over 100 parts.

Level 4 is detailing and small stuff on the inside with parts range in the 200+.

Level 5 is for experts.

This kit has 300+ parts, engine detailing, lots of little bits for the interior that you may never see, etc. There's a lot of alignment, painting during assembly, etc.

Giving a kit like this to a child who has never built a model kit might be frustrating to the child and turn them off of model building.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Sunday, September 18, 2022 1:35 PM

Agreed. Given the number of parts, frequent lack of identifying part numbers, occasionally confusing or unhelpful instruction drawings, and general wonkiness of fit, it's a 4 without question.

Not toothache difficult, but likely challenging for sure.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Sunday, September 18, 2022 3:58 PM

Okay!

     Let's clarify this . Back in the day, when the molds were fresh, even then they were a Four to Four Point Five.Why do I say this? Well the molds have not shown improvement til They became guided under the new regime. The "OLD" A.M.T. Kits were good when fresh But after five or six years even they seriously began to degrade.

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, September 18, 2022 9:07 PM

Tanker-Builder

Okay!

     Let's clarify this . Back in the day, when the molds were fresh, even then they were a Four to Four Point Five.Why do I say this? Well the molds have not shown improvement til They became guided under the new regime. The "OLD" A.M.T. Kits were good when fresh But after five or six years even they seriously began to degrade.

Yes, and even back in the day when brand new, AMT kits were not thought of as highly as comparable Revell and Monogram cars and trucks. The Star Trek kits were cool, but horribly done. And that was a big money license.

Again, their trucks were cool, but not as high quality as comparable company's kits.

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Seattle, WA
Posted by Surface_Line on Sunday, September 18, 2022 10:12 PM

I don't want to be disagreeable, but this discussion seems to have settled on the quality of the kit, and AMT in relation to Revell and the rest. 

Given that a person simply asked "What level is the kit", my guess is that the question was about the required skill level.  I think Rob's response about various levels and parts count is right on the point.  One thing that Rob didn't mention was that for a while, Revell used different scales - some years 1-4 and other years 1-5, so it is an inexact science at best.  Another is that sometimes simpler paint schemes got lower levels than two- or three-color schemes, even on the same set of plastic parts.  I couldn't help but notice this on the NASCAR kits of the early 1990s - different "levels" for the same Chevy Lumina, for example.

So I would say that the AMT truck kit is Level 4, without trying to split hairs too much.  The question was probably an effort to find a suitable gift for another person, rather than a determination of whether or not the questioner wanted to build the kit.

Rick

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Sunday, September 18, 2022 11:13 PM

Surface_Line

I don't want to be disagreeable, but this discussion seems to have settled on the quality of the kit, and AMT in relation to Revell and the rest. 

Given that a person simply asked "What level is the kit", my guess is that the question was about the required skill level.  I think Rob's response about various levels and parts count is right on the point.  One thing that Rob didn't mention was that for a while, Revell used different scales - some years 1-4 and other years 1-5, so it is an inexact science at best.  Another is that sometimes simpler paint schemes got lower levels than two- or three-color schemes, even on the same set of plastic parts.  I couldn't help but notice this on the NASCAR kits of the early 1990s - different "levels" for the same Chevy Lumina, for example.

So I would say that the AMT truck kit is Level 4, without trying to split hairs too much.  The question was probably an effort to find a suitable gift for another person, rather than a determination of whether or not the questioner wanted to build the kit.

Rick

 

I was also trying to point out that the age of a kit (or the age of the molds really), can make the model harder to build than when it was new. Worn out molds that produce parts that are slightly misaligned or warped can make a level 2 kit into a level 4 kit just because of fit issues and alignment issues.

Add to that, a company not thought of as a "great" model company, and that also adds to the difficulty level.

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Monday, September 19, 2022 7:28 AM

Hi Rob!

   Yeah, based on quality at the time, I used two ERTL International Conventional trucks for a client. That truck was so well molded I hated to have to modify it. So I bought one for myself! A FIVE for sure. But what a beautiful Five. They even included masks for the correct paint Pattern! AMT never did that. Revell's efforts were still in FOUR and then along comes Heller with A Volvo COE. All bets were off then! That had to be a six!!

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Fort Knox
Posted by Rob Gronovius on Tuesday, September 20, 2022 12:00 AM

Heller was notorious for their engineering philosophy of "Why use two pieces when we can do it with six?"

I think my first Heller armor kit was their venerable AMX-30 main battle tank. Easily one of the most over engineered tank kits to come out of the 70s.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Tuesday, September 20, 2022 12:18 PM

Rob Gronovius
Heller was notorious for their engineering philosophy of "Why use two pieces when we can do it with six?"

A philosophy subsequently adopted by Mirage in Poland. I love their ship kits, but oh boy....

(Completely off-topic -- with apologies -- but I couldn't resist.)

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
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