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Help painting fur

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  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Help painting fur
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 8:18 AM

Hi,

 

I'm not normally a figure builder, but I got a nice Star Trek Mugato conversion kit for the 

Moebius Kogar kit. The build thread is in the science fiction area.

 

 

Mugato:

 

 

I'm almost ready to paint the Mugato, here is where I'm at:

 

 

The hands/horns/face/spine should be fine with a sand color, but the fur has me stumped.

It's a dirty white as you can see, should I go with a very light grey/tan base coat and then dry brush clean white over it? Or go with a clean white base coat and wash it with a light grey/white?

Or is there a better way?

 

Thanks very much.

 

Mark

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 9:17 AM

Well, how I'd do this- it may not be the best way. 

Paint the whole thing a light grey and then spray white down on him from the top hitting the highlights and leaving the shadowed areas darker. 

Hit him with a good solid coat of gloss. 

Add a wash of light grey over all. 

This should give you a good amount of defination to the fur detail. 

If you want more you can wet-brush the fur. Take a brush with white paint on it, wipe off the excess but leave it wet- not like you're dry-brushing and stroke the fur at about a 45 degree angle. 

If that comes out too much you can always mix a very thin wash of white paint and spray over the whole model to knock down the contrast.  

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 11:59 AM

Interesting idea, Thanks!

  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 5:37 PM

Hi. Its a large beastie and I don't usually work in this scale, but if it was me I would use a layering technique. If you look at the photos there's a lot of colour in there. I would probably start with a dark tan working to a light tan and then some greys to dirty white and finally some dry brushing in white. I would keep the layers thin and build them up gradually. It would be useful if you had something to practice on like some Milliput. Roughly mold a piece into a body shape, score it to resemble the surface you are trying to paint, let it dry and cover it with the same undercoat and practice away. Make sure to let each layer dry properley before starting the next. If all this fails there's always fishing .......

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 6:23 PM

I would avoid using pure white except for the very highest of your highlights, and use an off-white for the most of those areas where you want to use white.  But otherwise, either Gamera's or Dodgy's technique will work.  Both help give the molded details the depth that a fur coat shows.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 6:46 PM

Thanks very much!

 

Good advice.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 8:14 PM

Good luck however you do it. And please keep us informed, I can always use more advice on painting fur.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 9:02 PM

Will do.

 

Thanks everyone for the advice!

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Thursday, August 20, 2020 4:03 PM

Ok, so here is where I'm at.

 

I hit the Mugato with some light sand and grey, then let it dry.

 

 

Then misted flat white over him, and let dry.

 

 

Next I misted some Tamiya Racing white paint. It's drying now.

 

 

 

So far I've been using Tamiya Lacquer. 

I think I'll do a light wash of dark tan, thinned enamel. The some dry brushing of pure white.

 

Anyway, that's what I'm thinking now.

 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Thursday, August 20, 2020 6:28 PM

Falling back on my Commercial Art training, my reflex would be to to start very close to the darkest shadow/hair root color.  Then build up a "middle" layer of color thorugh a "wet" sort of dry brushing.  Then highlight with the fur tip color through dry brushing.

An argument could be made to use a medium tone base, and build up through nearly-clear washes to get the depth of color desired.

I've used oil washes to try and get horses to look right--if never quite to my satisfaction.

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Thursday, August 20, 2020 6:55 PM

Ok, thanks!

 

Just so I understand, my next step should be to re spray the darkest color. Then "wet" dry brush the next lighter color over most of the mugato, enamel paint?. Let that dry. Then dry brush some almost pure white (enamel again) over the high areas of the fur?

 

Thanks very much!

 

Mark

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Friday, August 21, 2020 8:06 AM

That looks good! 

I'd go with some light paint 'wet' dry-brushed over the higher spots IMHO. 

 

In any case looking forward to seeing more! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Sunday, August 23, 2020 6:56 AM

Thanks!

 

I let him set for a few days to fully cure.

With the flat white and then the raceing white coats I lost some of the contrast of the tan/grey layer. I went too heavy with the raceing white I think.

 

Rather than start over I decided to try a wash. 

I went with Model Master light rust, its a tan/yellow color. I figured the enamel paint would not dissolve the Tamiya lacquer. 

I thined it down a lot and put it on with a thick/loose brush and wiped off excess.

 

So here is where I stand now:

 

 

 

I let him sit overnight, today or tomorrow I'll dry brush on some very light grey, let dry, and then just a bit of pure white.

Then I'll reevaluate.

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Sunday, August 23, 2020 8:20 PM

I got the damp brushing done today. I'm pleased with the results. The flat white worked well.

I think now the mugato fur has a little depth.

 

 

 

As you can see I've started on the base also.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, August 24, 2020 12:12 PM

Nice progress!

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Monday, August 24, 2020 6:32 PM

Ohhhhhhhhhh, that looks cool!!!

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Monday, August 24, 2020 8:18 PM

Thanks!

I'm getting close.

I masked the base today.

 

 

And most of the detail painting was started.

 

 

 

His face/hands/feet are Italian sand.

 

The spines are sand

 

The horn is light brown.

 

Sadly I forgot his ears. I'll fix that tomorrow.

 

The Face is a shade too dark. I might repaint it. 

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Tuesday, August 25, 2020 8:09 PM

I finished the Mugato.

 

Today I washed the face/hands/feet/horn with a very thin flat white. This knocked down the brown a bit. 

 

Then I flatcoated him.

 

Lastly I put some black in the eyes and then used some Micro Krystal Klear to give 

the eyes some depth.

I'm happy with the results, thanks for all the help. I needed it!

 

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2010
  • From: Boston
Posted by mach71 on Friday, September 4, 2020 6:42 PM

I added one minor detail on a suggestion from another forum.

 

The communicator looked out of place, so I added a scratch built phaser one.

 

The dials are too big, but I think it look good.

 

 

 

There, now I think I'm done!

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Friday, September 4, 2020 8:08 PM

Oh, the unicorn lizard monkey thing .  .  .  I was thinking it was time for a cat dip!

That is a procedure similar to giving a cat a bath - you place the cat in the toilet, close the lid, sit down and flush. Then, after the water stop splashing out from under the lid, you stand up while holding the lid closed. Then when sufficiently out of the path between the toilet and the bathroom door, you lift the lid.

The cat will drip dry; trust me.

The cat painting process is similar; just a bit messier. Again, trust me.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

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