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Pegasus Hobbies Nautilus

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  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Wednesday, May 11, 2022 9:04 PM

Coolness!!! 

Glad you learned a lot about casting from the gold truck. Still crossing my fingers you'll be ready to get back to her one day! 

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Wednesday, May 11, 2022 9:11 PM

Still crossing my fingers you'll be ready to get back to her one day! 

Keep them crossed, I will need the encouragement!

  • Member since
    October 2021
Posted by PhoenixG on Wednesday, May 11, 2022 10:32 PM

OMG, my brain completely overlooked that the Bullion Express resin casting project was yours!  I stumbled across it a little while back and read the whole thread to learn about your experiences.  It is such an informative post.  I've been greatly enjoying following your work on it.

Great to see how your efforts there have paid off here. YesGeeked

On The Bench:

1/700 Space Submarine I-401

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Thursday, May 12, 2022 2:25 AM

Bakster-  Yes, it was serious business.  Way back before WWII, the government considered it a vital means of emergency communications in case the usual channels were shut down during an attack.  Morse code can be used under high noise and low signal strength conditions that would render voice communication impossible.

Gimme a pigfoot, and a bottle of beer...

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, May 12, 2022 9:44 AM

Cadet Chuck

Bakster-  Yes, it was serious business.  Way back before WWII, the government considered it a vital means of emergency communications in case the usual channels were shut down during an attack.  Morse code can be used under high noise and low signal strength conditions that would render voice communication impossible.

 

Hey Chuck-- Now I understand! That is very cool to know, I always wondered what the deal was. Thanks for educating me! 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Thursday, May 12, 2022 10:31 AM

 

Just signing on after a road trip, I am so happy to find this thread. Nothng quite like a Bakster WIP to keep things lively around here! Looking forward to it, and at first glance, that interior is nicely detailed as it is, should be fun to see what you do with it.

Interested to see some familiar names here are hams, active or not. I'm a new one, and not really very active.

K9GCR

-Greg

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, May 12, 2022 10:42 AM

PhoenixG
OMG, my brain completely overlooked that the Bullion Express resin casting project was yours! 

Yup-- that was me. Confused

PhoenixG
I stumbled across it a little while back and read the whole thread to learn about your experiences.  It is such an informative post.  I've been greatly enjoying following your work on it.

Glad you benefited from it! I have said it before, that is why I detail the good, the bad, and the ugly. We all learn from it!  And let me tell you--that was a struggle learning that. In the end, I learned a new skill, and I have a pressure pot taboot!

I cast the door in my last post using the PP. I'd probably be fighting bubbles without the pot. Though, this cast was an much easier mold and cast. So, maybe, bubbles would not have been an issue. Hard to know without trying, but the PP almost guarantees a good cast. I am glad I have it because it will continue to pay dividends. 

Btw, I will share an oops. The resin I have has a 3-minute pot time. The clock starts ticking the second you pour part A and part B together. You then have to mix it quick and thoroughly. That takes maybe 1.5 minutes. That leaves me with 1.5 minutes to put the mold into the PP, position the lid, clamp down the four clamps, and slowly feed air into the pot. It's a race. So, I get the lid secured and I attached the hose. In the rush, I failed to notice that the valve on the lid was in an open position. Guess what happened when I attached the hose? Poof! It was 40lbs pressure into the tank all at once. Well, too late to do anything about it now, so it was a wait and see. 

Later, I released the air, unscrewed the clamps, and lift the lid. Oh boy...the mold is laying on its side. The air shot into the tank with such velocity it blew the mold on its side. And that is how it cured. LOL. But here is the thing. There was enough resin left in the mold that I got a cast out of it. Albeit a very thin cast. Since I must sandwich two together, it should still work. In fact-- because it is so thin, there will be no sanding for that cast. This could be a silver lining. And if I must cast another one - no big deal. 10 minutes work and it's done. Just thought I'd share the latest debacle. 

The next time I order resin from them I will get their 10-minute pot time. 3 minutes is crazy! Indifferent

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Thursday, May 12, 2022 10:44 AM

You're most welcome!

Back in my high school days, our radio club participated in many civil defense drills.  We worked with other emergency agencies like the National Guard, Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, local sheriff and police departments., etc.  We would set up a HQ base in some public building, as well as establishing outdoor field bases in tents, powered by generator sets, and spend a whole Saturday simulating an atomic attack on our area, practicing organizing emergency operations and communications.  There were many people and their portable and fixed radio bases involved.

I really enjoyed it, and it felt good to be doing some community service.

Gimme a pigfoot, and a bottle of beer...

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Thursday, May 12, 2022 10:53 AM

We really should have started a separate thread for this ham radio discussion.  It just grew, starting with a brief comment from someone.  

Sorry, I did not mean to hi-jack this excellent Nautius thread!

Back to the main topic, I built that Nautius recently and gave it an antique finish.  I started with a base of titanium gold, then started working in related colors like copper, green, various shades of rust, really just winging it free-hand and blending in layers of color, even finishing up with some weathering powders.

My wife said this is the best model I ever made, and I tend to agree with her!

Gimme a pigfoot, and a bottle of beer...

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, May 12, 2022 11:03 AM

Cadet Chuck

You're most welcome!

Back in my high school days, our radio club participated in many civil defense drills.  We worked with other emergency agencies like the National Guard, Red Cross, Civil Air Patrol, local sheriff and police departments., etc.  We would set up a HQ base in some public building, as well as establishing outdoor field bases in tents, powered by generator sets, and spend a whole Saturday simulating an atomic attack on our area, practicing organizing emergency operations and communications.  There were many people and their portable and fixed radio bases involved.

I really enjoyed it, and it felt good to be doing some community service.

 

You know- I envy you. I would have loved to be part of something like that. It would make for a more rewarding life experience. More recent technology has in ways connected people, but it's digitally connected. Is has isolated people at the same time. We are not spending time together and I miss that. Or maybe it's just me getting old. Family members passing, health issues and such. Of course, the covid debacle doesn't help any of this.

Anyway-- thanks for sharing that too. I love hearing life stories like that.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, May 12, 2022 11:07 AM

Cadet Chuck
We really should have started a separate thread for this ham radio discussion.  It just grew, starting with a brief comment from someone.  

Hey-- no worries! This is how my WIPs roll and I wouldn't want it any other way. This is what I like about them most-- the banter. 

Cadet Chuck
Back to the main topic, I built that Nautius recently and gave it an antique finish.  I started with a base of titanium gold, then started working in related colors like copper, green, various shades of rust, really just winging it free-hand and blending in layers of color, even finishing up with some weathering powders. My wife said this is the best model I ever made, and I tend to agree with her!

That sounds cool!  You are welcome to post pics here if so inclined. I would love to see it...

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, May 12, 2022 11:13 AM

Greg
Nothng quite like a Bakster WIP to keep things lively around here!

Cheers!  Drinks

Greg
hat interior is nicely detailed as it is, should be fun to see what you do with it.

Me too! LOL.

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Saturday, May 14, 2022 12:43 PM

A rambling Bakster build?  You don't say! Geeked

The use of "public airwaves" is sore complicated.  And government rgulations tend to be followed to the letter, at least until it causes more work for the regulators.

So, the code-key requirements remained.  Were driver's licences done the same way, we would all have had to demostrate how to hitch horses to a wagon, and drive a stick shift. Much as the Master's Certificate at sea ocer required the ability to name all the sails of a fully-rigged ship.

Things change.  Used to be, you needed to pass the VHF radio test to have a ship-to-shore "mobile" communications device for our automobiles.    These exploited a "loophole" in the Radio Operators regs.  Forty years' later we jst walk in the T-mobile store . . .

(Trivia:  "T Mobile" was begun as "Trucker's Mobile" as an alternative to the overloaded 11m CB band for communications on the road.)

One of the complications of getting an (aviation) Pilot's license is needing to get the VHF/UHF radio licensing to operate the radio in the plane.  (A Marine Pilot needs a Master's Certificate, a certain number of years on the given water way, and to pass a detailed test; and needs periodic recertification.)

Back to topic Smile

From memory Verne is under-specific about just what Nautilus is made of.   I believe it probably would have been iron, as that was the material of the age.  That almost suggests a rail-brown sort of color.  A chestnut roan sort of deep color that would be complicated (in an interesting sort of way to model) to render.

Now, the folk of that age were not ignorant cavemen, they new iron would rust.  So, they might have "iron blacked" their submarine.  Which was lampblack and coaloil in a lacquer base.

Thus, it could be a glossy paint sort of finish.  And, of course, gilding would have been a thing.

I want to remember reading about another build, where there was discussion about going "full Verne" and suggesting a paint job that replicated a fish.  Which would be suitable Victorian.  Painting a submarine to resemble a Trout or Salmon would be totally in keeping for the sensibilities of the age.

Imagine an iron trout a couple of hundred feet long chasing one's ship.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, May 14, 2022 12:55 PM

I removed the door from the bulkhead and added what is, for a lack of a better term, a door seal. I at first tried to make that using strip styrene but that was a no joy. The styrene was not flexible enough for the tight curves, it would kink. I then used the kit piece as a template and traced the opening onto some scrap resin. Then--drilling some holes into the area to be removed, I began cutting it away. Once I got to a large enough opening-- I glued the piece into the kit piece. Once cured-- I finished the job by trimming, filing, and sanding.

Example I captured:

The door is extracted from the resin cast:

The door is attached. As well--I flowed thin CA onto the door seal to help knock down some of the roughness.

That whole process went well! Perhaps this is a good omen for the build. 

Next, I will sort out the ceiling. I need to decide how I want to accomplish lighting. The ceiling has lattice work, or tiles if you will. Do I cut those all out? It will be a lot of work. Or do I remove the whole lattice panel and replace it with a solid panel? I suppose I could add back make my own lattice, but I am not sure that will save me time.

To be determined.

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, May 14, 2022 1:16 PM

CapnMac82
A rambling Bakster build?  You don't say!

Laughing. I am guilty as charged!

Thanks for the additional licensing information. That is very interesting to read. And I did not know that about T Mobile! Too funny.

Lastly-- that is some fantastic input about the color. I won't paint it like a fish but I have to say-- that would be cool to see done! Great idea.

Great to hear from you, Capn. You always shine an interesting light on things!

Steve

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, May 14, 2022 3:22 PM

Bakster
Cadet Chuck We really should have started a separate thread for this ham radio discussion. It just grew, starting with a brief comment from someone. Hey-- no worries! This is how my WIPs roll and I wouldn't want it any other way. This is what I like about them most-- the banter.

I knew Steve was going to say that, and I was just waiting to comment. I'm with Steve, the banter is a great part of Bak's threads, so please don't stop, Chuck.

Steve, nice hatch so far.

-Greg

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Saturday, May 14, 2022 6:05 PM

OK, Roger that, Greg!  I do enjoy the banter, and humor, too, that went on more in previous years.  Let's bring it back, guys!  It's been kind of dull, lately.....

Gimme a pigfoot, and a bottle of beer...

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by lurch on Saturday, May 14, 2022 7:58 PM

I agree with Chuck. Sometimes we need a good laugh.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, May 14, 2022 9:06 PM

Sounds like a plan, guys. Yes

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, May 14, 2022 9:21 PM

Well, I took the dive and tried opening up the panels. A few hours later and I have the center rows opened up. I think that for lighting sake, that is all I need. I will then make and mount diffusers for them, and behind that, I will make a light box driven by probably two Leds. 

I took a drive to HobbyTown today for paint. The first three colors I wanted they were out of stock on. Son of a. I think I found colors that will work, though. 

I am enjoying the build thus far. It has not been fighting me.

  • Member since
    August 2021
Posted by lurch on Sunday, May 15, 2022 4:29 AM

This thing is going to be great Backster. I am looking forward to when you finish it.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, May 15, 2022 9:54 AM


"From memory Verne is under-specific about just what Nautilus is made of.   I believe it probably would have been iron, as that was the material of the age.  That almost suggests a rail-brown sort of color.  A chestnut roan sort of deep color that would be complicated (in an interesting sort of way to model) to render."


Last night I watched 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. It was interesting to see how Disney portrayed the boat, and clearly, it was made to look like iron. For the most part the interior was dank and the walls had signs of rust. They did a nice job with it.

Speaking of the Disney movie, I watched a video on its making. It was interesting to learn that Disney spent millions on its production. Apparently, Walt was a huge Jules Vern fan and he went for broke making the movie. At the time, in the US, it was the most money spent making a movie to date. Had people not come out in droves to see the movie, it may have bankrupted Disney. Interesting to reflect on the what ifs.

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, May 15, 2022 9:54 AM

lurch

This thing is going to be great Backster. I am looking forward to when you finish it.

 

Thanks Lurch!

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Sunday, May 15, 2022 11:33 AM

Hmm, had a notion--Humbrol "Track Colour" (aka Rail Brown) overlaid with a deep metalic bronze, and finished with a bit of Clear Green.

Maybe.

Perhaps.

MostlyI was noodling on how one might render both dark and light highlights in such a color scheme.

Deep "mahogany" sorts of metalic colors can be complicated.  "Bronze" ought to highlight gold and shadow "esspreso" (and I would be drawn to a deep blue base to offset the "orange" of the "gold" highlight.

Colors can be compolicated.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, May 15, 2022 1:08 PM

"Hmm, had a notion--Humbrol "Track Colour" (aka Rail Brown"


Hey Capn, I Googled it and yeah, I agree, that is a good starting point for sure. I like it.

Though, I already purchased Tamiya LP25. Take a look that. It is Darn close to the Humbrol, but maybe tones out just a little more to the brown side. Maybe. Hard to judge from web images because of color shifting. Yeah some dry brushing might help. Mahogany might not be bad and I happened to buy some for the wood bookcases. The bronze is an interesting thought too. 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, May 15, 2022 1:14 PM

PS: I could buy red to mix with and shift the tone some too. i think I would like somewhere in the middle of the two paints.

Updated: Tamiya LP57 is closer still to the Humbrol. I could see if HT has that. I could mix the two. We shall see.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, May 16, 2022 9:22 PM

Is it a reclamation center?

No.

A rummage sale?

No.

Is it moving day?

No. 

No. It's just me excited to see paint flying. Mr Surfacer 1500 is applied. This is my second time using the stuff and in my opinion, it is right up there with Tamiyas primer. It came out extremely smooth. I likey.

It is time to paint some color. I think I will start with the couch. It won't be as complex.

Sorry for the mundane, but I warned ya. Embarrassed

 

  • Member since
    August 2007
  • From: back country of SO-CAL, at the birth place of Naval Aviation
Posted by DUSTER on Monday, May 16, 2022 9:50 PM

Priming is premo. ( I had to)

I had a mundane once, had to give it to a shelter. He was eating out of house and home.Confused  Yours seems nice, though.

Steve

Building the perfect model---just not quite yet  Confused

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Monday, May 16, 2022 10:00 PM

DUSTER

Priming is premo. ( I had to)

I had a mundane once, had to give it to a shelter. He was eating out of house and home.Confused  Yours seems nice, though.

 

Lol!  Someone with a sence of humor. Well done, sir!

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: SW Virginia
Posted by Gamera on Tuesday, May 17, 2022 8:43 AM

I like the Captain's rail brown suggestion. I should be about the same rusty colour.

I agree with the guys, it's something that you're probably going to have to fiddle with till you get it where you want it. Maybe grab a paint mule old model or three and just start playing around with it/them.

"I dream in fire but work in clay." -Arthur Machen

 

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