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best/most realistic product for 1/350 running rigging

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  • Member since
    September 2010
best/most realistic product for 1/350 running rigging
Posted by retdfeuerwehr on Saturday, May 20, 2017 12:46 AM

What's the best thing to use for running rigging in 1/350 scale...need it for topping lifts, cargo whips, vangs, etc. for Jeremiah O'Brien. Has anyone ever used "Caenis" - or is it too small for a 70 y/o to see adequately??

  • Member since
    April 2016
Posted by Staale S on Saturday, May 20, 2017 2:56 AM

I have, for 1/700 scale. Franly, Caenis is too small for this 46-year old to see adequately, even under a ton of light. I had to use variously-sized bits of white paper placed whereever convenient on the model to create enough contrast to see what I was doing with the black line, I was working on a camouflage-painted WWII ship hull and the camo was very effective in hiding the Caenis line.

It is an absolute nightmare to work with. It also looks superb on the model when I have finally managed to get it in place.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, May 20, 2017 9:57 AM

I learned a trick during the rigging of my Roberts monitor.  I used five mil monofilament, both black and white.  I used black for the stays and white for other things (signal halyards and antenna wires (I colored the antenna with a brown magic marker after rigging it).  Anyway, I could not see either the black or white while doing the rigging- it got lost in the clutter of the workbench.  What I found works, is to cut two panels from black and from white foamcore.  I propped up the white piece as a background while I was rigging with the black thread, and the using the black piece as I rigged with the white stuff.  At times it was inevitable that the thread would tend to disappear against parts of the ship, but I was still able to complete the rigging by moving the thread till I regained sight of it against the background panel.

The result was rigging that was barely perceptible afterwards, which I feel is desireable.  Use of too high a contrast, either because of color or of size, looks bad, to me, on small scale ships.  Ordinarily, when using larger threads on larger scales, I use shades of gray or offwhite.  Steel rigging on modern ships is not a stark black, and on fiber lines the fiber is usually not pure white.  But once a line falls below a certain size (angular) with respect to your eye resolution, your eye and brain only perceive the contrast, not the color, so I find five mil stuff does work in black and white, the only colors I have found to buy in that diameter.

BTW, I am 79, and just had cataract surgery, during building of that model.  Rigging is sure easier now!

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, May 20, 2017 2:06 PM

Uni Caenis:

EZ Line:

Cargo boom rigging:

 I'm stumped on the J O'B. I'm seriously considering using short pieces of thin wire and making up these rope and block assemblies before installation. I've seen where PE sets come with similar little items used as lifeboat falls and I wish it was available here.

I am impressed with folks such as Don S. who can work with mono. I have a really hard time getting knots to hold. Uni Caenis is a version of mono, but it is so thin that knots hold.

EZ line knots really well, and it is pretty easy to install.

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, May 21, 2017 11:18 AM

Every time I rig a model with mono, I swear I will never do it again.  I feel like I am trying to knot thin piano wire!  Yet next ship or WW1 aircraft, I find myself doing it in mono.  Problem is, these days, finding fine enough thread to use instead of mono.

I talked to a clerk at Michaels several years ago.  She said they don't carry that much of a variety in thread these days because they have seen a big drop in hobby sewing.  I find I can get the finest stranded thread at Model Expo.  For finest mono I go to a fly tying place.  Where do others go for fine threads? 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, May 21, 2017 5:11 PM

Egg head trivia.

Uni Caenis is 20 deniers.

What is a denier?

A unit of measurement. One denier is a thread that weighs 1 gram per 9000 meter length.

Apparently a silk strand is one denier.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Monday, May 22, 2017 10:08 AM

GMorrison

Egg head trivia.

Uni Caenis is 20 deniers.

What is a denier?

A unit of measurement. One denier is a thread that weighs 1 gram per 9000 meter length.

Apparently a silk strand is one denier.

 

So what is the diameter?

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Monday, May 22, 2017 10:37 AM

The AWG is 20/0.

I buy it from a fly tying outfit, Stockards.

Tpo be honest though, "bought" it would be more accurate. 200 yards is going to last me quite a while.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 8:53 AM

GMorrison

The AWG is 20/0.

I buy it from a fly tying outfit, Stockards.

Tpo be honest though, "bought" it would be more accurate. 200 yards is going to last me quite a while.

 

Is that American Wire Gauge 20 gauge?  That seems thicker than I thought.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 9:37 AM

0.043 mm diameter. About a mil.

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Tuesday, May 23, 2017 9:46 AM

Don Stauffer

 

 
GMorrison

The AWG is 20/0.

I buy it from a fly tying outfit, Stockards.

Tpo be honest though, "bought" it would be more accurate. 200 yards is going to last me quite a while.

 

 

 

Is that American Wire Gauge 20 gauge?  That seems thicker than I thought.

 

 

20/0 is "twenty aught",

00000000000000000000 gauge 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

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