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3D printing for naval subjects

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  • Member since
    September 2010
3D printing for naval subjects
Posted by retdfeuerwehr on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 12:36 AM

Is anyone aware of 3D printing (like Shapeways) specializing in accessories for 1/700 and 1/350 ships? Shapeways has some really nice offerings ( a LOT of Brit things), an especially well-done DKM 15cm SK L/45 mount.

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Groton, CT
Posted by warshipguy on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 5:33 AM

Shapeways also offer a lot of American parts as well in both 1/700 & 1/350.  For example, they offer conversion sets that enable builders to build USS Pennsylvania, a round bridge USS New Jersey, conversions for many Essex class carriers, etc.  I have been very impressed.

Bill

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 6:28 AM

Yes, search Shapeways for ModelMonkey and/or diStefano.

Be aware that such items such as gun barrels or lattice work may be beyond the current state of 3D technology.  Look at Frosted Detail material vs Nylon.  The latter has a pebbley surface which is harder to bring to a satisfactory finish condition.   

Material info for Frosted Detail plastics here:

https://www.shapeways.com/materials/frosted-detail-plastic

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: 37deg 40.13' N 95deg 29.10'W
Posted by scottrc on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 7:59 AM

I used Modelmonkey parts and have been quite impressed.  The process is not what your standard tabletop 3D printer will do, its resin fused depostion.  Formlabs makes a machine that is capable if this quality of modeling, which my company has been interested in purchasing for use in short run production and proto-typing.  The material requires a wash and UV cure.  Sometimes, the Shapeway parts don't come fully cured, so they need to be set in the morning sun for a few hours, then washed with a toothbrush and mild detergent to get all the "resin" dust off.  If this is not done, any paint applied will bubble and peel because the material is still outgassing.  I learned the hard way and didn't read the instructions when I got my first part.Dunce

  • Member since
    May 2008
  • From: Wyoming Michigan
Posted by ejhammer on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 8:20 AM
Oddball scales too. Recently got 1/500 3"/50 guns for a box scale Naval oiler USS Mattaponi AO41 I'm doing. Also, see some stuff at 3dmodelparts. 1/700, 1/350, box scale and more.

Completed - 1/525 Round Two Lindberg repop of T2A tanker done as USS MATTAPONI, USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa Dec 1942, USS Yorktown 1/700 Trumpeter 1943. In The Yards - USS ESSEX 1/700 Hasegawa 1945, USS ESSEX 1/700 Dragon 1944, USS ESSEX 1/700 Trumpeter 1945, USS ESSEX 1/540 Revell (vintage) 1962, USS ESSEX 1/350 Trumpeter 1942, USS ESSEX LHD-2 as commissioned, converted from USS Wasp kit Gallery Models. Plus 35 other plastic and wood ship kits.

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 8:36 AM

A while back I ordered some guns from Shapeways for my 1/144 Mid War Gato  and was blown away by the level of detail in the 3" deck gun and the Oerlikons! The barrels are hollowed to show the bore. Every tiny gear, handle and component is sharply and clearly visible.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Tuesday, December 12, 2017 9:31 AM

After seeing the pics of PJ's order, I also did an order for the 1/144 Gato, as well as for my 1/72 Gato.  The 20's in 1/72 are just flat out nice.  The 1/72 4"/50 had issues in making and I think they got it ironed out but have not ordered it out yet.  If anything like the 20's, will be a standout detail on the deck.

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: North Carolina, USA
Posted by Model Monkey on Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:41 PM

Thanks, fellas for the kind comments and recommendations!

I am Steve Larsen, the designer on Shapeways whose shop is Model Monkey.  Happy to be here and happy to answer any questions you may have.

Cheers!

Steve Larsen

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, February 16, 2018 1:48 PM

Model Monkey

Thanks, fellas for the kind comments and recommendations!

I am Steve Larsen, the designer on Shapeways whose shop is Model Monkey.  Happy to be here and happy to answer any questions you may have.

Cheers!

Steve Larsen

 

Hi Steve

I think I ordered my deck weapons from someone else at Shapeways but I was VERY impressed with the level of detail. These 3D printed items blows away pe, resin and metal ones.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    February 2018
  • From: North Carolina, USA
Posted by Model Monkey on Wednesday, February 21, 2018 8:32 PM

plasticjunkie

Hi Steve

I think I ordered my deck weapons from someone else at Shapeways but I was VERY impressed with the level of detail. These 3D printed items blows away pe, resin and metal ones. 

Thanks so much!

Yes, 3D-printing has come a long way in a very short time!  The 3D printing machines used by Shapeways are not your $200 garage or high school printers extruding nylon, they are state-of-the-art machines that cost a whopping $70,000-90,000 USD, printing in very high-quality acrylic plastic called "Frosted Detail".  They can print in layers just 16 microns thick, that's 16 millionths of a meter, for exceptional detail.

Be advised that acrylic plastic does not behave like injection molded polystyrene so it takes a little getting used to.  Testors liquid cement won't work on it (use CA instead) and putting your new 3D-printed parts in the sun for a few hours to make sure all the resin has completely hardened is a must, especially if you prefer to use enamel paints rather than acrylic paints.  Any microscopic bits of liquid acrylic resin remaining in the plastic will react with the enamel paint and keep the paint from hardening.  Sunlight exposure prior to painting is the cure.  Unlike polystyrene, direct sunlight is actually good for 3D-printed acrylic plastic.

Surfaces are generally rougher than injection molded polystyrene, but often the roughness disappears under a coat of paint.  If you find the surfaces to be too rough, don't sand it, use an "air eraser" instead which can smooth acrylic surfaces without harming detail.  They look and work like an airbrush but are much cheaper: models by Harbor Freight run about $30 USD and models by Paasche are very popular, too.  Instead of emitting paint, an "air eraser" emits a grit.  Use common household baking soda as the grit.  It's cheap, non-toxic, and plentiful.  It's probably already in your kitchen.  You'll need a compressor capable of about 50psi but the results are excellent.

There are several excellent designers on Shapeways offering products for modelers, I'm just one. My focus is US Navy and Deutsche Kriegsmarine with a smattering of Royal Navy designs.  For Royal Navy fans, be sure to check out another shop on Shapeways called "Micro Master".  The designer, a Brit living in New Zealand,  does some superb work, very carefully researched for the best accuracy possible.  Some designers produce amazing figures in many scales to populate your ships.

Most designers who have shops on Shapeways are not Shapeways employees at all, just folks all over the world with some CAD skills and a desire to produce the most accurate designs based on the best available authoritative references. 

Many modelers have provided invaluable assistance in creating Model Monkey designs, including scans of original builder's blueprints obtained from the National Archives.  These subject matter experts offer advice during the design process because they are modelers, too, and want the product to be just right.  They simply care.  

One of the benefits of 3D-printing is that if new, authoritative references are discovered, designs can be improved without the need for cutting steel molds.

There are now more than 1500 Model Monkey designs and many new designs will be coming this year.  New designs are released weekly.

Some products can be printed in real metal like silver, bronze, brass and even come plated in real 14k or 18k gold or rhodium (a very white-silver-looking metal).  I offer ready-to-print nameplates for over 300 ships in these metals.  They include a decorative nautical rope border, very classy. Requests for custom names are gladly accepted. There are some size limitations when it comes to metals and the number of characters is limited, too, but the same nameplates can also be printed in inexpensive acrylic in much larger sizes with many more characters.  They can be offered in your favorite font, in Cyrillic letters or Greek letters, too.

Thanks again for the kind words!

Happy modeling!

-Steve

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, February 22, 2018 3:58 PM

I ordered a set of 1/350 4.1" guns for the SMS Emden,they provide the open mounts and the shields,their on their way now.Looking forward to getting them I'll post pics

  • Member since
    September 2005
  • From: Central Nebraska
Posted by freem on Thursday, February 22, 2018 4:09 PM

Tojo

I got that set last November for the Emden I am working on and you will be blown away by the insane detail!  The shielded mounts are beautiful and super detailed and seem to be sturdy. I haven't used them yet but they will take that kit to a whole new level.

I also am using the Gold Metal PE set and it is great too.

Chris Christenson

 

  • Member since
    February 2018
Posted by midelburgo on Wednesday, February 28, 2018 5:44 PM

I will just leave a link with a video of how a huge model of the XVIIth century flagship of De Ruyter is made in just hours, to be completed in 11 days.

 

http://www.materialise.com/en/cases/all-hands-on-deck-for-glorious-galleon

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