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Rigging a Revell Cutty Sark

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  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: NE Oklahoma
Rigging a Revell Cutty Sark
Posted by Allen109 on Saturday, October 8, 2005 6:56 PM
I wanted to ask you guys if the instructions provided in the kit are sufficient for rigging and if you have any reccomendations on books.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Lacombe, LA.
Posted by Big Jake on Saturday, October 8, 2005 7:47 PM
Allen109.

I feel the instructions are O.K. , But the earlier written instr. versions prior to 1969 gave "more" instructions. Here is a link you some pics of one I did based in the kit instructions. Look for the Cutty Sark Album. I understand there is a book by "George campbell or some plans by him that will help yyou also.

Jake Groby

http://community.webshots.com/user/jbgroby

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Glenolden, PA
Posted by highlanderburial on Saturday, October 8, 2005 11:47 PM
The only advice I would have is throw out those nasty plastic ratlines and rig your own.
They look much better....
The book I like is Historic Ship Models, by Wolfram Mondfeild. Its very good.
HB

Imagine a witty signature right .....here....

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Sunday, October 9, 2005 8:52 AM
I agree with all the above - including a strong recommendation to trash those gawdawful "shrouds and ratlines." The next step is to junk the plastic "deadeyes and lanyards." Replacing them with aftermarket parts takes more time and practice (and, unfortunately, more money), but makes a huge difference in the look of the finished model.

There are some excellent references on the Cutty Sark. For model builders, the first acquisition I recommend is the set of plans drawn by George W. Campbell. (He was the naval architect responsible for the ship's restoration, back in the 1960s.) The plans come in the form of three sheets, and contain every bit of information a modeler could possibly want. (Exception: the details of how the iron hull framework is put together. But that info isn't relevant for most modeling purposes.) And they're fairly easily available. The gift shop on board the ship sells them over the internet for a remarkably reasonable price (about $15, if I remember right). I've heard from a modeler who ordered the plans that way quite recently; he got them, via airmail in a mailing tube, within a week or two.

The Cutty Sark's website, www.cuttysark.org.uk/ , seems to be down today (at least I couldn't get it to come up), but normally you can use that address to order the plans. Click on the "shop" button and scroll down to "Paintings and Prints."

Those plans can be a little overwhelming, especially if you haven't done much rigging work before. Quite a few good books are available. The Mondfeld work that highlanderburial mentioned is a good one - a solid, basic text on ship modeling, though its coverage is so broad that it doesn't give much info on any specific ship. Another excellent, low-priced beginner's text is George Campbell's Neophyte Shipmodeler's Jackstay. Mr. Campbell's book China Tea Clippers is a fun, well-done source of excellent drawings and information about ships like the Cutty Sark.

If you're interested in "reading around the edges" of this subject, the best general work on rigging of ships during that period is Harold A. Underhill's Masting and Rigging: The Clipper Ship and Ocean Carrier.
On the ship herself, the most thorough book is The Log of the Cutty Sark, by Basil Lubbock. And the old classic by C. Nepean Longridge, The Cutty Sark: The Ship and the Model, tells in detail how Longridge built his beautiful 1/48-scale version, which is now in the Science Museum in London. The book is seriously dated (Longridge was working in the 1920s and 1930s), but it's a great source of inspiration.

If you only want to get one source, though, and you're looking primarily for help in rigging the Revell kit, I think the purchase I'd recommend is the Campbell plans. There's more information on those three sheets of paper than can be found in most books, and they're among the biggest bargains in ship modeling.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    October 2004
Posted by gleason on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 8:56 AM
Hi!

Just a quick note.

Even though I have not started on the Cutty yet, [ still working on the HMS Victory ] , I have two resources that I plan on using:

1 - Cutty Sark - Classis Ships by Noel C.L. Hackney
Published by Patrick Stephens, Cambridge

Even though the book was written as a guide to the Airfix Mode, it is excellant with it directions, photos, etc.

I bought the book online through Barnes & Noble.


2 - Detailing Revell's big Cutty Sark by Charles Lipkin, and published in the July 2005 issue of FineScale Modeler.

The article is quite good.

If you do a Cutty Sark search in the Forums, you will find several threads about the Cutty Sark.

Hope this helps.

<Gleason>


  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: vernon hills illinois
Posted by sumpter250 on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 3:31 PM
The Underhill book (all of Harold A. Underhill's books)......excellent references. Another "good book" is Steele's elements of masting and rigging.
Pete

Lead me not into temptation ..................I can find it myself

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, October 11, 2005 8:20 PM
Steel's Elements is a terrific book - one that belongs in the library of anybody who's seriously interested in the sailing ship. Be aware, though, that it's more relevant to earlier periods.

The first edition of it was published in 1794, with the title The Elements of Rigging and Seamanship. Subsequent editions - and modern reprints - had slightly different titles. (The original was in two volumes, with sections on anchor making and naval tactics.) It's an invaluable resource for anybody building a model of H.M.S. Victory or the U.S.S. Constitution. For rigging the Cutty Sark, though, Steel is almost a century out of date. (For instance, the Cutty Sark, launched in 1870, had iron lower masts, double topsails, and wire standing rigging - none of which Steel ever heard of.)

Since we're talking about books of that nature, I'll mention another one: Seamanship in the Age of Sail, by John Harland with illustrations by Mark Meyers. This is a modern work (1984) that traces the development of the sail plan, rigging, and seamanship from the earliest days of the sailing ship through the twentieth century.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    February 2005
  • From: Australia
Posted by rokket on Wednesday, October 12, 2005 8:03 AM
"Seamanship in the Age of Sail" is a great book. IMHO any ship will look even better with the running rigging too, and tho there are differences throughout ages/ships, you still have to sheet out the sails, clue them up, and raise/lower the yards with halyards. Rigging is going to really add zing to your model. Get at least one book, even generic, and the "standard" rigging of any ship will become obvious.
AMP - Accurate Model Parts Fabric Flags, AM Uboat Goodies & More http://amp.rokket.biz/
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, October 13, 2005 2:22 AM
I notice in your photos the cabin have white trim around them and the roof matches the deck.
What are you basing this detail on?. I am building the cabin at the moment and would like to have correct info.
Jim
quote]Originally posted by Big Jake

Allen109.

I feel the instructions are O.K. , But the earlier written instr. versions prior to 1969 gave "more" instructions. Here is a link you some pics of one I did based in the kit instructions. Look for the Cutty Sark Album. I understand there is a book by "George campbell or some plans by him that will help yyou also.

Jake Groby

http://community.webshots.com/user/jbgroby
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Thursday, October 13, 2005 10:25 AM
According to George Campbell, Jake got it right. The Campbell plans have this to say about the forward deckhouse: "White cove and margin [around the roof] / Remainder of deckhouse plain varnished teak / Roof bare teak."

The plans show her in her "as built" configuration. Photographs establish that in her later, wool clipper days the round-topped vertical panels on the deckhouse sides were painted white. (That's how they were the last time I was on board the ship - in 1997.)

Here's an indication of the detail to be found on the Campbell plans. The interior of the forward deckhouse was divided by thwartships bulkheads into three compartments. The forward - and largest - one contained bunks (upper and lower) for twelve seamen, a mess table, and a pair of benches alongside it. The next compartment aft was the carpenter's shop; his workbench stood against the after bulkhead. The aftermost compartment was the galley. The plans show the cookstove (with two burners) next to (but not quite touching) the forward bulkhead, a "dresser" on the aft bulkhead, a breadbox in the after starboard corner, a sand box in the forward starboard corner, and a coal bin in the after port corner. The decks in the forward two compartments are bare plank; the galley deck is covered with some material (canvas?) in black and white checks.

Campbell says the after deckhouse (between the main and mizzen masts) isn't shown on the original designer's drawing, but that it was there by 1871. (He thinks it may in fact have been there when the ship was built - but it isn't on the original plans.) He says the after house was "lengthened by 4' 0" in later years." (That implies that he couldn't find the exact date when it was lengthened. If he'd known, he would have told us.)

She also had accommodation for 22 seamen in a cramped compartment on the 'tween deck, ahead of the forward hatch, but Campbell suggests that "it is likely that the Forecastle accommodation was only partly used, with spare bunks."

The after deckhouse is divided into two compartments. The forward one contains four bunks - for the bosun, carpenter, cook, and sailmaker - and a table and two benches amidships. The after compartment has bunks for eight apprentices, along with a locker (with two hinged doors) and a water butt.

That's what I call a detailed set of plans. One can spend several enjoyable hours just reading the written notes on them.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Thursday, October 13, 2005 11:32 AM
As of today (October 13, '05) the Cutty Sark website, www.cuttysark.org.uk/ , is back up and running. It's a fine source of information about the ship - including lots of color photos.

For the George Campbell plans, click on "Shop" at the top of the home page, then scroll down to "Plans." The complete set of three sheets costs 10 pounds 50 pence - about $19.00 U.S. - including overseas shipping. (I believe that's airmail. Another modeler I heard from on the web got his - in excellent condition - within a week or so.) Disclaimer: I have no financial or other interest in the Cutty Sark, beyond being a big, longtime fan and a supporter of the current major restoration effort. But those plans are among the best bargains available in ship modeling. Those three sheets of paper, combined with the photos on the website, should enable anybody to build a beautiful, accurate model of the ship.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: NE Oklahoma
Posted by Allen109 on Thursday, October 13, 2005 5:59 PM
You guys have no idea how much I appreciate the help.These sources will help my grandfather and myself immensley. We both have taken on projects(me-Cutty Sark,Grandfather-french something,has tons of rigging and George Washiongton?),these references should ease the pain. Thank you.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, October 14, 2005 3:13 PM
Allen 109,
If you get the 3 sheets of plans of the Cutty Sark, you will not need any other rigging information. They are very complete and give for example the information on the wire vs hemp rope diameters for the standing and running rigging, and the chains under the yards( i think they were for the sheets). I bought those plans over 30 years ago and they changed how i looked at ship building from then on. Jtilley posted a very good reply to you.
The book you are getting or have ( based upon the Airfix kit) will initally seem to be very usefull, that is untill you get the Campbell plans.Big Smile [:D]
Have fun
TD
  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Stockton,Ca
Posted by Hippy-Ed on Saturday, October 22, 2005 6:47 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by highlanderburial

The only advice I would have is throw out those nasty plastic ratlines and rig your own.
They look much better....
The book I like is Historic Ship Models, by Wolfram Mondfeild. Its very good.
HB


I built this kit when I was 11 yrs. old and, didn't have the instructions!!Sign - Oops [#oops]Taped Shut [XX] I went to the library & found all available books & pics on it. he book mentioned here I believe was one of them. I tossed the "ratlines & did my own... looked alot nicer that way.
Happy building!!
If you lose your sense of humor, you've lost everything
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