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Wash Question

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WZ2
  • Member since
    November 2009
Wash Question
Posted by WZ2 on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 11:53 AM

I'm trying to remember how to do a simple wash.  Can't you mix a little acryl and water and a dash of soap to get a basic wash?     Apply and then wipe off in an hour or so?

 

Much thanks, Chris

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by batai37 on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 1:05 PM

According to opinions I've read, the wash should be of a medium different than your final coat of paint. If you use acrylics, many people use mineral spirits or turpenoid with oil paint for their wash. Also, a glossy overcoat such as Future or other acrylic-based clear is desirable so that the wash will flow uniformly into panel lines etc.

The reasoning being that if you use the same medium, the paint in the wash can bond to the paint job in an undesirable way so that you end up with a mess.

I've had good results with oil/turpenoid on models painted with acrylics. It dries fairly quickly and is easily removed with water should you want to start over.

WZ2
  • Member since
    November 2009
Posted by WZ2 on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 2:05 PM

Just for clarity, the wash will be done over Future.    Topcoat will likely be flat acryl.

 

Chris

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by batai37 on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 4:29 PM

WZ2

Just for clarity, the wash will be done over Future.    Topcoat will likely be flat acryl.

 

Chris

 

 

If over Future, I would go down to an arts supply store like Michaels or Hobby Lobby and pick up a tube of oil paint (if you don't have any already), a lot of people use Burnt Umber. Grumbacher, Academy, and Winsor Newton are popular brands, and get either a bottle of mineral spirits or turpenoid (I think turpenoid is more expensive). It's not cheap...usually around $10 for a small tube of oil paint in these parts...but one tube should last a long time.

If you don't want as stark a contrast on the wash pigment, you might pick up a grey pigment...that's strictly according to your personal preference, I've found grey to be more subtle especially for models painted in lighter colors. Some people start with a dark pigment wash first then add a lighter-pigmented wash over that. The acryl overcoat won't react with the wash.

In case you didn't know, the wash is primarily mineral spirits/turpenoid with just a little paint added...for burnt umber it would look like coffee. You have to really mix it well for the oil to dissolve, otherwise you end up with a kind of grainy uneven appearance once it's dried.

Experiment and have fun! Hope this helps.

  • Member since
    May 2006
  • From: Batesville, IN
Posted by ggatt_2 on Tuesday, January 12, 2010 4:48 PM

   Ditto what these guys have said about an oil wash. I use oils frequently to bring out details in cockpits, wheel wells, etc. Another method that's fantastic for panel lines is Tempura paints. All you do is  thin it with water and add a few drops of dish soap. Slop it all over the panel lines and surface detail, you don't have to be neat! Wait 10 minutes and wipe off the excess with a cloth. That's all it takes! You can find them at any craft store. Make sure you apply over a glossy surface or they'll be much more difficult to remove.

-Greg

  • Member since
    June 2009
Posted by MikeS71 on Saturday, January 16, 2010 11:40 PM

If you are doing the wash over a coat of future you can use enamel paint thinned with mineral spirits as well... this works well.  any excess can be cleaned up with Q-Tips or a rag SLIGHTLY dampened with mineral spirits...  the mineral spirits don't effect the Future at all.

  • Member since
    December 2009
  • From: Canada
Posted by Thivi on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 10:56 AM

Can someone please clarify the procedure to me, I'm a little lost. I'm just wondering how far along a wash is used. Would you spray on your Future after the paintjob is finished, then wash to bring out detail, or do you paint, future, wash, then flat coat it, and then go back and do more paintibg/detailing. I'm still a little new to all of this, and I've got numerous kits built, waiting for paint.

On the bench: 1/35 M1046 Humvee - waiting paint
                            "    M3A2 Half-track - waiting paint
                            "    LAV III

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by batai37 on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 3:30 PM

Thivi

Can someone please clarify the procedure to me, I'm a little lost. I'm just wondering how far along a wash is used. Would you spray on your Future after the paintjob is finished, then wash to bring out detail, or do you paint, future, wash, then flat coat it, and then go back and do more paintibg/detailing. I'm still a little new to all of this, and I've got numerous kits built, waiting for paint.

Generally a wash is applied after you've laid Future or whatever gloss overcoat you prefer over your final coat of paint. The reasoning is that the wash will flow easily by capillary action over a glossy surface into recessed areas and around raised details, as opposed to a flat finish. You'll see what I mean when you do it. Over a flat finish it tends to pool and not flow as uniformly and, as mentioned already, if you want to remove the wash it will be harder to get off a flat finish than a glossy one.

After you've achieved satisfactory results with the wash, you would then apply your final overcoat to seal it. Any further detailing/painting would be according to your preferences for the desired result, but obviously you wouldn't want to paint over your wash since that would essentially undo the results of your wash (unless that's your intention).

The wash can always be redone, but you would want to repeat the process of applying a gloss coat before laying down your next one. To save work, you would probably want to be satisfied with your final paint job before laying down a wash, but those perfectionists among us often find ourselves redoing things.

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 4:09 PM

I'm interested & hence nosing around in this thread.

On the assumption that we are using both acrylic paints & Future, can acrylics be used for a wash after a Future gloss coat?

If so, whhat ratios of what do we use & how is it applied / removed?

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by batai37 on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 4:37 PM

Milairjunkie

I'm interested & hence nosing around in this thread.

On the assumption that we are using both acrylic paints & Future, can acrylics be used for a wash after a Future gloss coat?

If so, whhat ratios of what do we use & how is it applied / removed?

See my first post above. Generally your wash should be composed of a medium other than that of your paint. Future is acrylic-based.

  • Member since
    October 2007
  • From: Scotland
Posted by Milairjunkie on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 4:52 PM

OK, so an enamel wash over Future is alright? I assume I mix it with enamel thinners, but to what sort of ratio?

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by batai37 on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 7:32 PM

See MikeS71's response above. As for ratio, it should be just enough paint mixed in the mineral spirits to give it color...the wash is essentially thinner colored with a little paint. You'll have to experiment to find just the right ratio that you find suitable, preferences run from more to less pigment. The less paint you add, the subtler the effect will be.

  • Member since
    September 2007
  • From: Truro Nova Scotia, Canada
Posted by SuppressionFire on Wednesday, January 27, 2010 7:49 PM

Future is arcylic so washes based on mineral spirits won't effect it.

Enamel base coat can have a arcylic wash applied over it. The arcylic looks great wet, then drys unsatisfactory.

A 'sludge' wash is soap added with intent to whipe off most, best on gloss coat like future. Flat paint will stain.

Best results are a coat of arcylic future and use enamel based washes. Oil paints seem to be the popular choice. A compromise would be a pin wash to target specific pannel lines, keeping thinned paint to individual details.

.Good luck and wash em' up!

 

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y211/razordws/GB%20Badges/WMIIIGBsmall.jpg

 

 

  • Member since
    January 2008
Posted by rippel66 on Thursday, January 28, 2010 2:06 PM

Hi!

 

To answer your original question, yes, you are eight and it will work fine just as you originally suggested it. No need to spend more or complicate it. Have fun!

  • Member since
    January 2008
Posted by rippel66 on Thursday, January 28, 2010 2:07 PM

That is you are "right" not "eight". sorry

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Draper, Utah
Posted by bushman32 on Thursday, February 4, 2010 3:06 PM

I use enamels for my base painting. Can a lacquer based glosscote, such as Testors, be used between the base coat and wash? I take it I would still have to use an acrylic for the wash.

Ron Wilkinson

  • Member since
    June 2008
  • From: Iowa
Posted by Hans von Hammer on Thursday, February 4, 2010 9:24 PM

Yes...

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Tempe, AZ
Posted by eptingmike on Tuesday, April 20, 2010 3:50 PM

As an aside, I was under the impression that the use of acrylic wash on top of an acrylic paint job/coating was OK so long as it was fully cured.  If I am not mistaken, acrylics are rather hardy once cured...it is the fully cured part that is the crux!

Horten_IX_Go-229

  • Member since
    April 2010
Posted by Theuns on Wednesday, May 5, 2010 11:59 AM

Hi all.

I have nit yet used the oil baced wash, but have had rather good results with chalk pastels scraped into a fine powder, mixed with some water and a drop of liquid soap to make a "slurry"

The range of collours are endless.

 

Theuns

  • Member since
    November 2021
Posted by Beagle on Thursday, November 11, 2021 11:09 AM

I'be good luck with minwax polyurethane dark walnut wood stain as a wash.

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