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Heating putty to dry

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  • Member since
    August 2012
Heating putty to dry
Posted by JMorgan on Thursday, February 4, 2021 1:04 AM

Does anyone know if heating tamiya putty will help it cure faster when it is applied thick? Thank you in advance.

  • Member since
    April 2004
Posted by Jon_a_its on Thursday, February 4, 2021 3:24 AM

JMorgan

Does anyone know if heating tamiya putty will help it cure faster when it is applied thick? Thank you in advance.

Um no... It it is a straight-out-the tube filler, applying too thick will cause it to: Shrink, heat up, & possibly ment/distort your kit, or all three.

Applying enough Heat to make it set quicker would cause damage to your model.

The best way to apply straight-out-the tube filler is to:

Minimise the need for it, where possible, ie fill deep holes/seams with sprue or plasticard.

Then apply in thin layers, allowing to thouroghly dry/gass out between layers.

Or use something else, such as:

Deluxe Materiels Perfect Plastic Putty or a two-part putty, like Milliput, Duro, etc.

They shrink considerably less, and can be shaped with water, q-tips, fingers, etc, TO MINIMISE the amount of sanding you will need to do.

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  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Thursday, February 4, 2021 5:58 AM

Solvent putties such as Tamiya, Squadron, Bondo Red, etc harden by evaporation of the solvent.  Applying too large a lump may not harden, or may take a while to harden throughout because a skin of dry putty forms over the rest of the putty.  Heating the putty still needs a place for the solvent to go.   Perhaps piercing the skin multiple places/times may help.  Heating may also warp the surrounding plastic.   

Similarly, don't use solvent putties inside a sealed space such as a nose cone to hold weights.  The solvent has no place to go and can warp the plastic

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, February 4, 2021 9:19 AM

The speed of setting is one reason I like auto glazing/spot putty.  The solvent is a fast evaporating one- smells about like lacquer thinner.  I find it sets up in twenty to thirty minutes unless it is a very thick application.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, February 4, 2021 12:20 PM

Jon_a_its
 
JMorgan

Does anyone know if heating tamiya putty will help it cure faster when it is applied thick? Thank you in advance. 

...The best way to apply straight-out-the tube filler is to:

Minimise the need for it, where possible, ie fill deep holes/seams with sprue or plasticard...

I'd go back one step before the point where there's a seam: test-fit as much as possible, and where possible, use the extrusion method.  Run liquid styrene cement along a seam and apply enough pressure to extrude a bead of melted plastic along the seam.  Band or clamp the piece till it sets.  When it has set, scrape away the bead with a hobby knife.  This reduces the amount of seam cleanup work as much as possible.

And generally, I like Jon's method.  I like to use styrene where possible, on seams, gaps, holes, sink marks, with liquid cement for styrene, on a styrene kit.  I like that the material is homogeneous throughout.

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