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So how does one get rid of wheel sprue attachment points...

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  • Member since
    February 2021
So how does one get rid of wheel sprue attachment points...
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Thursday, March 18, 2021 2:07 AM

Hello folks. Apologies because I am sure this question has been posed many times before (but I could not find a thread with its answer on the forum). Is there a way to remove/prevent these 'pesky' sprue attachment points from being left on one's model tank wheels (after cutting them out and sanding)? Or is the only/best option to 'disguise' them as road wear? (On another thread, I think that one poster (thanks Bish) mentioned that one can roughen up one's wheels using a file: this sounds like a realistic technique that one can use).   

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, March 18, 2021 3:28 AM

With any wheel i slice off any left over attachment and then go over with a soft sanding stick, this will conform to the wheels and help prevent flat spots. Its harder with aircraft wheels which tend to have molded on detail. This usually removes it no problems. Roughing up the wheels does work if they have rubber rims, but not steel ones, so its worth being able to remove it without reliying on covering it up.

I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Harrier GR.3/Fujimi 1/72nd Ju 87D-3

  • Member since
    May 2004
  • From: Land of Lakes
Posted by cbaltrin on Thursday, March 18, 2021 6:19 AM

I can't add anything to what Bish said; however, I will make one request:  Please don't appologize for asking questions...

 

On the Bench: Too Much

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, March 18, 2021 6:24 AM

cbaltrin

I can't add anything to what Bish said...

Likewise, except to say that a good-quality pair of flush-cutting sprue nippers can minimize all the necessary cleanup. The slight extra expense is well worth it!

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Thursday, March 18, 2021 6:29 AM

Cut them off close and sand them,gotta be careful not to flatten them though,I like to roll my wheel along the sanding stick

  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
Posted by Bish on Thursday, March 18, 2021 7:11 AM

Ditto What Greg said.

I am a Norfolk man and i glory in being so

 

On the bench: Airfix 1/72nd Harrier GR.3/Fujimi 1/72nd Ju 87D-3

  • Member since
    July 2014
Posted by modelcrazy on Thursday, March 18, 2021 8:24 AM

ScaleModeler_1973
I am sure this question has been posed many times before (but I could not find a thread with its answer on the forum).

The serch engine is horiffic on this site. I'll search for one of my own threads, enter all possable ke words and the return is something I never asked.

It's easer to just ask again. If someone finds the question that was asked earler they can and often will attach a link. 

Steve

Building a kit from your stash is like cutting a head off a Hydra, two more take it's place.

 

 

http://www.spamodeler.com/forum/

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, March 18, 2021 8:25 AM

The better the nipper or sharper the knife you use to remove it from the sprue, the better.  Then I clean up the sprue with a needle file.  I personally find needle files preferrable to sanding sticks.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, March 18, 2021 9:49 AM

Ditto, What Tojo72 said!

 With this note. When I cut any wheel or wheel and tire part off the sprue I do NOT cut as close to it as possible. I leave a little nub that I gently sand off, then rotate the item a few times  on the sanding tool,to make sure it is round.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, March 18, 2021 11:55 AM

modelcrazy
The serch engine is horiffic on this site. I'll search for one of my own threads, enter all possable ke words and the return is something I never asked.

Just as an FYI, searching through a regular engine like Google and simply adding the term 'Finescale' is a lot faster and simpler.

I don't even bother with the on-site search function, since it has never proved useful.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    February 2021
Posted by ScaleModeler_1973 on Thursday, March 18, 2021 2:19 PM

OK, many thanks to the many people who shared (their knowledge and experience). Encouraging also that 'repeat'/new to the hobby questions are not frowned upon (this is a friendly and respectful forum). In reading and processing what folks have posted/suggested here, I think that my error is that I have been using my hobby knife (and sometimes sprue cutters) to try to cut too flushly against the edge of the wheel. When I take a hobby magnifier/loupe to them, I can see that the roughness after I cut/clip from the sprue is actually incuse (into) the surface of some of my wheels (No amount of sanding/flattening will ever get them completely smooth (smacking side of head:( Thankfully, these sprue attahcment marks don't look nearly as bad when seen with the naked eye. The point is just that  I think (as some posters have pointed out) one really does need to cut farther from the surface of the wheel to leave a nub, some kind of outward protrusion to smooth down. Sounds like I need to both work smarter and research smarter with searching for existing threads too. I am going to try to improve my sprue wheel cutting/sanding technique with my current build (I recently started working on a Tamiya Pershing 1/35th kit- and it has plenty of wheels). Thanks again.

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Building models on my kitchen counter top~somewhere in North Carolina
Posted by disastermaster on Thursday, March 18, 2021 5:24 PM

I'll nip my tire (wheel) part off the sprue (but not close to the part) then use my nail clipper to eliminate the remainder. The radius on the clipper head suits nearly every size. After that, a bit of buffing with a #400 sanding stick in the direction of rotation and a few fast buffs across my blue jeans. Works fine, no problems. Been using nail clippers since 1960.

On the kitchen counter top in North Carolina

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