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Newbie has questions

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Newbie has questions
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, December 28, 2002 3:52 PM
I recently got into modeling and I love it. I want to purchase a decent airbrush and some paints. Right now I have a cheap airbrush and a dozen Testors acrylic and enamel 1/4 ounce paints. I need some advice before I invest more money. Any recommendations on good, reasonably priced airbrushes and paints?
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Saturday, December 28, 2002 6:34 PM
All the major brand airbrushes will give excellent results. You can buy a single-action brush, but it won't satisfy you long. The double-action units like Badger's 150, Aztek, Iwata, and Paasche are well made. It might be useful to see what your local hobby retailer stocks, because they all need replacement parts sometimes. Again, any name brand paint will give good results if used right, but some are tougher to use, and some are more toxic than others. Ventilation is essential with airbrushes, and fire safety is as well. Open windows won't get it, power ventilation or outdoor only use are the only two safe choices, especially with lacquers or enamel. Even most acrylic thinners contain alcohol, and are toxic, though not as much as mineral spirit and lacquer thinner.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Sunday, December 29, 2002 2:32 PM
I'd have to agree that a dual action airbrush will be your best bet just because of its flexibility in what you can do with it. A single action airbrush is good for wide areas of one uniform color but that's about it.

When it comes to brands of airbrush, you will seldomly go wrong if you purchase products from Paasche, Badger or Binks. I've heard good things about Iwata but I've never tried their products so I can't say for sure. I'd stay away from the Aztec line though, They are a fair product but I find even their dual action brushes are rather limited in abilities, they're not something you want if your looking at an airbrush as a long term investment.

Ventilation is also key, I can't accomodate a nice spray booth where I currently live, so I do all my airbrushing outside on my patio. You should also invest in a good quality respirator mask, the rubber type that seals to your face and has replaceable filter cartriges.

Don't be fooled into thinking that acrylic paints are totally safe just because they wash up with water or it says "non toxic" on their labels. Acrylics are plastic in a liquid form, this means that when they have dried, they are a plastic coating on whatever you applied them to, that includes the inside of your lungs if you inadvertantly inhale acrylic paint mist from an airbrushing session. Ventilation is good, protection is better still.

One final note about airbrush purchasing, if you're looking at Paasche products, You may come across an airbrush called the Paasche Turbo AB. This monster is unlike any other airbrush out there and is intended for the proffesional airbrush artist, not Joe Average hobbyist. Its expensive, very touchy and if you damage it, you need a proffesional to fix it. If you see one, steer clear of it. Its a fine tool, but not meant for us hobby types

Good luck!
  • Member since
    December 2002
Posted by billc3207 on Monday, December 30, 2002 11:13 AM
I have both Badger and Paasche airbrushes and I really prefer the Paasche. It is a double-action which takes some getting use to but you will really appreciate the fine lines that it will produce. You will also need an air source and I recommend a compressor. That is the best option for most modeling. Get one with an automatic shut-off and an adjustible pressure gauge. Most compressors produce air at too high a volume for fine work. You will also need a moisture trap. Paasche makes one that fits in the air hose and is very convenient to empty. I suggest that you order over the internet as you will save money over local hobby stores like Hobby Lobby and Michaels. I use Testor's Model Master and their small bottles of enamel and have had excellent results. Buy some small pieces of styrene (1"x4") and practice on them.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 2, 2003 2:26 PM
Wow, I know that I didn't start this thread, but this was a question I was having...as I am a newbie who is just getting into building models (beyond the kits built as a kid), too. Thank you for the good information. I have made some notes for myself as I start to look for my new air brush.

Sorry cjc2575, I hope I didn't hijack your thread.Smile [:)]

DH...out
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, January 6, 2003 4:16 PM
Thanks for the advice guys. You all helped a lot.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by naplak on Wednesday, January 8, 2003 12:54 AM
have been using a Badger 360 for a little while now and it is GREAT! Suggested relail is about $200, but some places have it for as little as $85... I got mine from Dixie Arts:

http://www.dixieart.com/Dixie_Art_Supplies_Airbrush_Main_Page.html

I really like this brush cuz it handles enamels, acrylics, and lacquers all the same with just one nossle.

I have a Paasche compressor with a regulator... And I also have a Badger 200, and had a Paasche.

naplak Modeling:
http://www.naplak.com/modeling
www.naplak.com/modeling ... a free site for modelers www.scalehobby.com/forum/index.php ... a nice Modeling Forum
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by weebles on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 12:39 AM
I posted this on another topic. I started with a Paasche H single action airbrush. I tried a double action and hated it. Mostly because it was difficult to use and clean. So now I've been with the H for over 15 years and I love it. I haven't seen anything that would make me change.

For compressor I would suggest getting something with a tank. I use a craftsman with a large verticle tank. But I use it for blowing out my sprinkler system in winter. It's over kill for modeling purposes. Another option is to purchase a compressed air tank, and find a company locally that will fill it for you. Put a pressure regulator on it and you're good to go. This is a low cost, low noise option which I know a lot of modelers prefer.

Good luck Smile [:)]
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 9:37 AM
I use a Badger 150 DA airbrush with an old discount-store compressor, after wearing out two Badger 200 single actions. As for a tank air source, Paul Boyer has often recommended a CO2 tank. The tank costs a bit, but the refills are cheap, and the gas is dry, the tank is quiet, and unless you spray in a plastic bubble, the gas won't hurt you.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 24, 2003 3:57 AM
anybody can help me how to create a good air brushing result, and what is the different between acrylic pant and enamel paint. is tamiya paint(in small bottle) an acrylic paint?.
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Foothills of Colorado
Posted by Hoser on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 10:24 AM
This was also posted on another topic. Hope it helps ...

Since you are new to airbrushing, and prices for new airbrushes can be expensive, try looking on eBay. I recently bought an airbrushing lot including a Paasche VL, a Vega (Thayer and Chandler) Nailaire and an old Sears compressor for $62.00 including shipping. All are in excellent condition. There are some great deals out there if you are willing to search and have some patience.
"Trust no one; even those people you know and trust." - Jack S. Margolis
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, January 31, 2003 12:55 PM
I use a Paasche VL and am very happy with it (although I'm definitely still learning the ins and outs of the thing). I have heard lots of good things about the Paasche H (single action) and the Badger line. My opinion would be that any one of those units combined with some good practice and experimentation with paint consistency and air pressure will yield good results. Whatever you get, spend some time playing around and practicing. The more you use it the more reliable and predictable it will be.
The other advise I'd give is to 'take care of it'. Keep it clean and the needle/nozzles in good shape and it will give you years of good results.

Good luck!
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Foothills of Colorado
Posted by Hoser on Friday, January 31, 2003 8:33 PM
web_boy,

Re: paint types - as a general rule, acrylics are water-based, enamels and laquers are solvent-based. To thin acrylics, you can use water, alcohol (my favorite) and I have heard some folks use windshield washer fluid with good results. Enamels and laquers are thinned with 'hot' solvents; xylene, toulene, acetone, etc. For enamels, Testors Model Master Airbrush thinner is a good choice. When I shoot laquer or fingernail polish, I use PPG automotive laquer thinners, (because I have it around) but you could go to a major discount store and pick up a can of generic laquer thinner for a couple of bucks.
2 Warnings!
1) When spraying ANY paint, make sure you have a paint booth, plenty of ventilation, or a good "fumes" respirator (paper dust masks wont work) or at best, a combination of all 3.
2) For laquers and enamels, lay down a primer coat and test your primer and mixture on a spare part or some sprue from the kit to make sure the solvents wont eat your project.
And practice ... that's the best teacher.

Good Luck!
"Trust no one; even those people you know and trust." - Jack S. Margolis
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