SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

weathering Sequence

611 views
7 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2008
  • From: N.H. USA
weathering Sequence
Posted by TZombie on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 10:26 AM

Hi All- I'm finishing up a Dragon SU-100 and have the base coat applied. With all the color options available I'm going with dark green. Should I drybrush the raised surface areas before I apply the gloss coat and then proceed with the washes etc or should I dry brush after the gloss coat? I realize there is no wrong or right way, I'm just wondering what you folks prefer. thanks for your time.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 11:28 AM

TZombie

Hi All- I'm finishing up a Dragon SU-100 and have the base coat applied. With all the color options available I'm going with dark green. Should I drybrush the raised surface areas before I apply the gloss coat and then proceed with the washes etc or should I dry brush after the gloss coat? I realize there is no wrong or right way, I'm just wondering what you folks prefer. thanks for your time. 

I'd probably wait to do any drybrushing till after applying a gloss coat, and after decaling, too.  Because the gloss coat may negate the effects.  It's not a hard-and-fast rule, of course, more of a guideline.  Some cases may be better handled by one or the other.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 3:01 PM

Dry brushing is best done on a flat paint or flat top coated surface. Are you planning to dry brush just a lighter color for highlights of the base color, or dry brush on your weathering such as sand or dirt?

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 4:19 PM

The way taught to me by a couple of armor & ship modelers ...

Rule 1:  Always remember to mix your media.   Acrylic gloss coat, oil based washes/filters.  In this manner the later items run a lesser chance of affecting earlier coats.   You can do oil/lacquer gloss and acrylic wash/filter if that is the way you swing.

1)  Paint and apply a gloss coat.  Apply decals and apply a gloss sealer coat.   This gloss coat facilitates moving washes & filters.  If there is a flat finish the wash particles settle among the flattening agent particles and makes a 'shadow' that is hard to remove (i.e. repaint?).  The gloss coat is also easier to clean up mistakes.   Wipe off and start over (see Rule 1). 

2)  You may apply several sealer coats between layers of washes.   Avoid build up though

3)  Happy now?  Apply a flat coat which seals everything in and gives a good surface for drybrushing.    Apply just a bit of paint to a broad flat brush.   Wipe on a paper towel until nothing shows -- then wipe another half a dozen times more.  You can always add more -- its really hard to add less

4)  Pastels/chalk -- you may want to seal these to prevent them from being removed by finger grease. 

  • Member since
    April 2008
  • From: N.H. USA
Posted by TZombie on Thursday, June 30, 2022 7:43 AM

As I expected some great stuff here... Thanks

Stikpusher- I was planning on drybrushing a lighter shade to accent the raised surface areas and use a wash to accent the recesses and all the nooks and crannies. As it sits right now it is a big dark green blob. (Sounds like a good premise for a movie.)

EdGrune - That was my plan of attack. I don't want to overdue do it so I will build up layer by layer slowly.

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Thursday, June 30, 2022 10:29 AM

I've done drybrushing  on both gloss and flat paints.  Sometimes I want to weather a vehicle with a glossy finish.  I have not had any problems putting either glosscoat or dullcoat over the finish, though I generally do the dry brushing afterwards.  I do find I can get a lighter shade of drybrush on a gloss finish.

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Thursday, June 30, 2022 11:10 AM

TZombie

Stikpusher- I was planning on drybrushing a lighter shade to accent the raised surface areas and use a wash to accent the recesses and all the nooks and crannies. As it sits right now it is a big dark green blob. (Sounds like a good premise for a movie.)

 

In that case I'd suggest doing your gloss coat over the base coat, add any decals at this point, gloss coat over decals if added, do your washes, which flow better over a gloss surface, clean up the excess, seal it with a flat coat, then do your dry brushed highlights. After that add any dust/dirt/mud with your preferred method(s).

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, June 30, 2022 12:58 PM

TZombie
I was planning on drybrushing a lighter shade to accent the raised surface areas and use a wash to accent the recesses and all the nooks and crannies.

That reflects the way I usually start things. I do an all-over dry-brush to 'tone' single-color blocs...the intent being to mimic natural light on full-sized surfaces, where the eye rarely perceives large areas of stark monotone color. This is mostly separate from dry-brushing mud, chipping or other actual 'weathering,' more a starter optical effect. Then I would follow with clear protective coats, washes and so-forth.

And, a friendly word of caution, should you end up doing any dry-brushing after decals have been applied: be careful of those decal edges. Even under a 'leveling' clear coat, dry-brushing can often catch on the decal edge, leaving a strange-looking outline that will 'give the game away.' Just ease up a little and go patiently, and it should be no problem. YesBig Smile

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.