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Question: Techniques for "Aging" Metal

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  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Waukesha, WI
Question: Techniques for "Aging" Metal
Posted by David Voss on Friday, December 6, 2002 10:22 AM
This question regarding "aging" metal was asked in another forum, but it seemed like it would be a good candidate for it's own thread in the newly created "Techniques" Forum. Smile [:)]
quote:
Originally posted by twkartist

Also, do you (or does anyone else) have a similar technique for aging "metal." I intend to wrap the wooden beams and planks with plastic strips built to look like hand-crafted iron work. I'm not sure a standard "rust" treatment would work, but maybe some combination of rust and some type of "corrosion" treatment to make it look like salt water had been eating on the iron. Any suggestions would be welcome.

The original topic can be found here:
Dioramas
David Voss Senior Web Developer Kalmbach Publishing Co. Join me on the FSM Map
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, December 9, 2002 7:20 AM
Are you asking about "plastic" metal or real metal? Question [?]
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Waukesha, WI
Posted by David Voss on Tuesday, December 10, 2002 11:26 AM
quote:
I intend to wrap the wooden beams and planks with plastic strips built to look like hand-crafted iron work.

I believe the answer to your question would be "plastic" metal.

Thank you for catching that. Smile [:)]
David Voss Senior Web Developer Kalmbach Publishing Co. Join me on the FSM Map
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Monday, December 16, 2002 10:28 AM
This might be a case where you would want to create a rough texture, maybe by adhering some powder to the substrate to look like the swollen appearance corroded metal often has. You might also want to soften the sharp edges a bit to create a more irregular look.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 1:35 PM
I recently posted my own solution to creating "rusted" iron on the original posting in the "diorama" forum, but I'll also put it here.

This method should work very well for simulating the look of built up corrosion on either iron or copper items.

First, grind up some perlite (available in most well stocked garden supply shops) to the consistency of baking soda.

Second, mix your paint to your prefered tone of reddish brown for iron oxide or greenish blue for copper oxide. Apply a smooth base layer of this paint to your subject piece.

Pour some of the remaining paint into a saucer or other flat container and gradualy mix in the crushed perlite. Continue mixing until the perlite has become completely covered in the paint, you don't want any of its original white color showing through. After mixing, thin the mix out as you would if you were preparing paint for an airbrush.

Next, take an old toothbrush and dip its bristles into the paint, making certain that some perlite is picked up. Point the bristles downward and pull your finger across them, toward you, so that the paint is thrown onto your subject. You'll want to spray excess paint onto a paper towel or something first before aiming it at your model.

The perlite will give your finished paint job the same gritty appearance that iron or copper oxide has. Also, it will allow you to build up the paint in spots, so that you can achieve the lumpy, uneven texture that long standing buildups of this sort of corrosion often have.

Good Luck!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, February 8, 2003 11:48 PM
I just use Rust-All. It makes a nice random pattern. You can control the amount of weathering from a little abuse to junk heap rust.

http://www.rustall.com/

John
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