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scribing panel lines

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  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Canada
scribing panel lines
Posted by James Mark on Monday, January 27, 2003 11:36 PM
I am starting to scribe my own panel lines, but I'm very much in the experimental stage...I use my X-Acto 11 blade (both regularly and upside down), or I've tried chucking a needle in my pin vise, and even asked my dentist for some broken tooth scraprers...I find the tooth scrapers work great because they remove a small chunk of plastic instead of splitting the plastic apart and leaving a raised edge (like the X-acto knife does). I also find the X-acto and dentist tool scribe the lines to thick...they don't match the other lines. (I'm modeling 1/48 aircraft) I also have a hard time getting the line straight around compound curves (wing root, cow's, fuselage etc.)

Does anybody have any tips or miracle solution to scribing accurate lines...I'm tired of filling and rescribing botched lines!

also...what do most people use for a flexible straightedge?

THanks

JamesSmile [:)]
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: United Kingdom / Belgium
Posted by djmodels1999 on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 1:54 AM
Various companies are offering etched templates, with various shapes and curves. I have one made by Scale Aircraft Modelling magazine, but it is a bit on the thick side and you might be better off looking at the VLS catalogue.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by weebles on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 8:10 AM
One technique I picked up somewhere (can't think of where) was to use label making tape. Not the stuff for the new ones, but the old style that you had to press down on each letter. I haven't looked to see if it's in the stores still so I'm not sure of availability. Hope that makes sense. But it is flexible and the adhesive helps it stay in place. It's not very good for tight turns and ridges. Good luck.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by jcarlberg on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 11:01 AM
I've had good luck using the Squadron scribing tool, and Bare-Metal makes one as well. Both of these tools work like the dental scraper, in that they actually remove plastic rather than just displacing it. Verlinden makes panel shape templates as well.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Canada / Czech Republic
Posted by upnorth on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 11:27 AM
The older label making tape is very good stuff and its still available in well stacked stationery shops,

I've had good luck with Bare-Metal's scriber, Tamiya also makes one, but I find it a bit big and awkward in tight places. As for needles in your chuck, it all depends on the kind of needle you use, theres as many different needles as there are sewing techniques out there. I've had the best success by using glover's needles in my number 1 Exacto knife handle, I have to cut their shafts down a bit so there isn't too much play in them. They have a three edged point thats usually hardened to some degree and I find they cut a much sharper line than most other needle types.

If you're trying to restore detail on the flat surfaces of your model, say a fuel cap on the wing somewhere, one of the best tools I'm aware of is a draftsman's erasing shield. Its a thin flexible piece of metal, usually about the size of a business card with a good variety of shapes cut out of it. You should have no problem finding one of these at any drafting or art supply store. Staedler makes a very good one and I've never seen this item to be terribly expensive.

Hope that helps
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Canada
Posted by James Mark on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 12:57 PM
Thanks for the replies...I'll try these tips out!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, January 30, 2003 1:28 PM
The Bare Metal scriber works really well for me, but the downside is if you slip and make a mistake, it is hard to correct because you have to sand alot of material off. My new technique is to use a Model Master scriber to start the line, (it dosen't remove too much) and when it is established switch to the Bare Metal scriber to finish.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: New Zealand
Posted by nzgunnie on Saturday, February 15, 2003 9:43 PM
I have a dentist's scraper, a small hooked one, rather that the larger almost half circle type. I found it made too thick lines, so I carefully ground down the thickness, and now it works very well.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 16, 2003 2:20 AM
The brand name on the label tape is called Dymo. For curved lines, cut a thin strip, and hold it down with larger pieces overlapping it. (Got that idea from a book, btw.)

Great idea on the erasing shield, as none of the otherwise-well-stocked shops in town carry a scribing template.
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