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Homemade Air-compressor

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  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: New Zealand
Posted by nzgunnie on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 7:46 PM
Ok I stand corrected on the oil issue!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 11:54 AM
carlosm,
Fridge compressors usually need oil added to them or they will burn out. On mine, I've put an 'in-line' oiler on the air intake line, and an oil/moisture trap on the 'output' line. Essentially, this keeps a small about of oil running through the compressor and then filters it out before it is delivered to my storage tank. I have to clean the oil/moisture cleaner every month or so.
No problems so far...

M.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: New Zealand
Posted by nzgunnie on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 2:23 AM
you need an oiless compressor for airbrushing, and you realy need a storage tank, otherwise your air will pulse with each stroke of the compressor.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, March 8, 2003 1:21 AM

Can anyone tell me if the compressor is supposed to work with oil and if so will it spit oil out of the hose? if its dry wont it burn out later on??
Thank you
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: NE Georgia
Posted by Keyworth on Monday, March 3, 2003 8:17 PM
Another alternative is to find an inexpensive compressor, add a pressure regulator calibrated for lower airbrushing settings, and get an old empty propane cylinder or the like (emphasis on empty!!!), such as the disposable ones for Coleman-style stoves and lanterns, and simply use that as your storage recepticle. All you need too do is add the connecting pressure tubing and hardware (inexpensive and available at Lowe's, Home Depot, etc.) and your in business. MIne was built in an afternoon-a few frills added to it- and it works quite well.
"There's no problem that can't be solved with a suitable application of high explosives"
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 3, 2003 5:36 PM
do u live in kennesaw andrew?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 2:21 PM
Just a few quick notes about my 'fridge' compressor:
- it has a storage tank attached to it and the pressure is regulated from the tank, not the compressor. Therefore, the pressure is consistent.
- The basic components are: compressor, tank, regularor/gauge, and a pressure switch. If you have to buy all of these things 'new', then the cost of building this might get a little steep when comparing to an 'off-the-shelf' unit. However, if you can get some of these at a discount or salvage place, then it can be pretty cheap. The hoses/fittings are cheap and readily available assuming you've got some basic mechanical and electrical ability.
- The big advantage of the fridge compressor is it's noise (or lack of). It is dead silent and the air coming out of the airbrush makes more noise than the compressor.
- I've seen other guys build these using old fire extinguishers or even tires for the 'tank'.

M.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by Tinker on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 5:11 AM
The Osprey Modelling Manual #6 entitled, Airbrush Painting Techniques has just the info you're looking for on pages 20-25. The article includes excellent color photos, step-by-step directions, and line drawings. I agree with the previous responder who suggested buying a small a/c with a 2 1/2 gal tank would be cheaper. But, to each his own. That's what makes horse racing. Smile [:)] Good luck.
" 'Polls' are surveys of uninformed people who think it's possible to get the answer wrong." ...Ann Coulter
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 23, 2003 5:17 PM
Try the link again. There was a dot at the end that shouldn't have been there...

(I edited the above message so it is correct..)

M.
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: USA
Posted by weebles on Sunday, February 23, 2003 12:22 PM
Hi Andrew, no disrespect intended, but why? I'm not sure how much money you have to spend here, but I would think you could find a small compressor with a storage tank for not too much money. I'm not sure a refrigerator compressor will give you the consistancy in pressure you would want to see. Just a thought. Good luck/Dave
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, February 23, 2003 10:34 AM
mkish, the link dont work...
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 20, 2003 10:02 AM
Andrew,

http://www.geocities.com/hugedom/model_misc.html

I have built one for myself at home, but it is a little different than this one. Same general concept, but not a 'neat-and-tidy'. I'm very happy with it, but be very careful when working around with compressed air. My one recommendation would be to put a 'check-valve' in the line between the compressor and your storage tank. This essentially lets air flow only one way (into the tank). If there is air pressure on the fridge compressor, it might not 'start' the next time it is turned on (by pressure switch or manually).

M.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Homemade Air-compressor
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, February 20, 2003 2:49 AM
I'm after information anyone may have about building a compressor from a fridge motor. I know it can be done, but as yet am unable to find any information on how to go about it. I have the main component, the fridge motor, and are ready for the next step.
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