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How often do you…

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  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
How often do you…
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, February 12, 2022 10:26 AM

polish your AB needle and what is your method? Do you sharpen it as well? Do you see a performance difference when you do? What difference do you see?

This is something I don't do and I am wondering if I should get into a regiment of doing so. I suspect the answer is yes.

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, February 12, 2022 10:31 AM

I have a Paasche H, so in my case, I never polish the needle...never needed to. Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, February 12, 2022 12:18 PM

For grins, I polished my AB needle using fine grit sanding cloths. I could not feel a bent tip but I suspect it might have been a little wonky, and it was not very sharp. After that process, I did a spray session, and I didn't seem to have any globules in the final paint. In other words, no tip dry. And that is what I was seeing of late, and why I went on this journey.

For what it is worth. Wink

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, February 12, 2022 12:18 PM

Eaglecash867

I have a Paasche H, so in my case, I never polish the needle...never needed to. Cool

 

 Thanks Eagle!

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Saturday, February 12, 2022 12:34 PM

I never polish mine,I didn't think it was maintenance,I thought it was something you did if you had a problem,like irregular spray pattern or paint accumulating in the tip because needle was crooked.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, February 12, 2022 3:58 PM

Tojo72

I never polish mine,I didn't think it was maintenance,I thought it was something you did if you had a problem,like irregular spray pattern or paint accumulating in the tip because needle was crooked.

 


Hey thanks, Tojo. I was thinking the same as you until I hit on a video where the guy talked about how the needle can over time become rough, contributing to tip dry. And that  started my curiosity. I suppose it won't hurt to polish the needle from time to time.

  • Member since
    November 2020
  • From: Blaine ,MN
Posted by BootBoyx2 on Saturday, February 12, 2022 5:35 PM

I actually did this a couple of days ago. Found I had a slightly bent tip and wanted to fix it. Watched some YT and found out how to polish too. Did what it said and it took out the slight bend and it did make a noticable difference on the polish. It did make a more enjoyable spray session. Give it a try you might be surprised, I was. Good luck. 

Be careful of what you ask for, you just might get it.

  • Member since
    March 2013
Posted by patrick206 on Saturday, February 12, 2022 5:38 PM

Hi, Steve -

Even with new needles I do polish them full length, starting with 600 grit and finishing with 1200. Looking through a microscope, the new needles seem like a John Deere drive line part, after a light polish much more uniform and smooth.

The way they slide through the needle bearing is actually noticeable by the trigger feel. The smoother the trigger action, the better your control of the dual action feature.

My Badger's have dual angle needle ends, Don Wheeler demonstrates how to replicate those angles when polishing. The paint spray pattern is also improved by keeping the business end of the needles straight, clean and smoothly polished.

Might seem like overkill or obsessive, but I find it beneficial and well worth the time.

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, February 12, 2022 7:32 PM

patrick206

Hi, Steve -

Even with new needles I do polish them full length, starting with 600 grit and finishing with 1200. Looking through a microscope, the new needles seem like a John Deere drive line part, after a light polish much more uniform and smooth.

The way they slide through the needle bearing is actually noticeable by the trigger feel. The smoother the trigger action, the better your control of the dual action feature.

My Badger's have dual angle needle ends, Don Wheeler demonstrates how to replicate those angles when polishing. The paint spray pattern is also improved by keeping the business end of the needles straight, clean and smoothly polished.

Might seem like overkill or obsessive, but I find it beneficial and well worth the time.

 

 

 

Hey Patrick, thanks for chiming in, and as well, I was hoping that you would. What you are saying makes sence. I am not sure I am up to the task of shaping but if I have no choice one day, I will try It. For now, I will focus on the polishing. Thanks for the grits you use too. What I used today was in the 4000 range, so I probably didn't do any damage. Wink

For the new people, Dons link is below. Thanks again, Patrick!

https://sites.google.com/site/donsairbrushtips/tuning

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Saturday, February 12, 2022 7:50 PM

BootBoyx2

I actually did this a couple of days ago. Found I had a slightly bent tip and wanted to fix it. Watched some YT and found out how to polish too. Did what it said and it took out the slight bend and it did make a noticable difference on the polish. It did make a more enjoyable spray session. Give it a try you might be surprised, I was. Good luck. 

 

Say Bootboy, thanks for sharing your experience. Yeah, a bent tip will make a BIG difference. Several year back starting back in the hobby I purchased a new AB. It didn't go well straight from the box. I had MAJOR spitting issues and eventually it was determined that the needle was bent. I tend to think it was a bad needle straight from the box because when I purchased a new needle to replace it, the bad needle had a much more elongated taper by comparison. It looked like it was machined wrong and that the tip had a piece of slag on it. Lucky me to start back into the hobby with a defunct brush. Patrick helped me figure things out though. Wink  

Good to hear that you got your brush to working well!

  • Member since
    November 2020
  • From: Blaine ,MN
Posted by BootBoyx2 on Saturday, February 12, 2022 8:14 PM

Your welcome and thank you. Hope you have good luck with yours.

Be careful of what you ask for, you just might get it.

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Sunday, February 13, 2022 7:54 AM

I just polish my needles and thats it other than working the tips a bit extra on some.. One shot deal unless something happens to one.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, February 13, 2022 8:45 AM

oldermodelguy

I just polish my needles and thats it other than working the tips a bit extra on some.. One shot deal unless something happens to one. 

Are you willing to share your polishing method? 

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Sunday, February 13, 2022 12:09 PM

The average needle just gets 000 steel wool with Colgate tooth paste. Then two or three applications with a wad of tissue with Formula 1 Scratch out. Rougher ones or dull colored ones get sanding pads from 2000 to 3500, then the Scratch out. Burred ones or tip burr  gets worked on with a courser pad first then on to the same as the rest till sharp/smooth and finally shiny..

The first thing I do is roll the needle on a flat surface and make sure it's even straight. Then it's a good idea to look at the tip with a magnifier if getting odd patterns. The pads I'm speaking of are the little two inch square micro mesh ones and I just take those and pinch the needle between my fingers and rotate the needle working along the surface to the tip. Same with the steel wool. Burrs if any have gotten worked off with fine fingernail block pads first. A film of Glycerin and I'm done. The average needle takes maybe 10 minutes to get shiny. A badly bent tip ( I've never had one) I would order a new one and start from there. A curved shank can be straightened pretty well in your hands, re roll to check till it rolls smooth.

You would be surprised how well even a cheap Chinese airbrush sprays after a little deburring and tuning up/polishing.

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Sunday, February 13, 2022 2:20 PM

oldermodelguy

The average needle just gets 000 steel wool with Colgate tooth paste. Then two or three applications with a wad of tissue with Formula 1 Scratch out. Rougher ones or dull colored ones get sanding pads from 2000 to 3500, then the Scratch out. Burred ones or tip burr  gets worked on with a courser pad first then on to the same as the rest till sharp/smooth and finally shiny..

The first thing I do is roll the needle on a flat surface and make sure it's even straight. Then it's a good idea to look at the tip with a magnifier if getting odd patterns. The pads I'm speaking of are the little two inch square micro mesh ones and I just take those and pinch the needle between my fingers and rotate the needle working along the surface to the tip. Same with the steel wool. Burrs if any have gotten worked off with fine fingernail block pads first. A film of Glycerin and I'm done. The average needle takes maybe 10 minutes to get shiny. A badly bent tip ( I've never had one) I would order a new one and start from there. A curved shank can be straightened pretty well in your hands, re roll to check till it rolls smooth.

You would be surprised how well even a cheap Chinese airbrush sprays after a little deburring and tuning up/polishing.

 

And there it is, another powerful testimony about polishing. Excellent info, sir. Thank you!

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