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To buy or not to buy Mr. Pro-Spray Delux

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  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
To buy or not to buy Mr. Pro-Spray Delux
Posted by Bobstamp on Friday, September 9, 2022 4:26 PM

Oops! I bought a can of Mr. Hobby Mr. Air Super 190, thinking it was just a can of compressed air for dusting camera lenses, models, etc.:

https://www.micromark.com/Mr.Air-Super-190-Canned-Compressed-Air-Pack-of-6

It’s not, of course. It’s a source of compressed air for air brushes. But now I'm wondering if I can use that Mr. Air Super 190. CanadianGundam offers the apparently compatible Mr. Pro-Spray Delux: (https://www.canadiangundam.com/air-brushes-compressors/3103-mr-pro-spray-delux-ps183.html).

I have avoided even trying an airbrush system because it just isn’t compatible with my small apartment. I am wondering, however, if the Mr.Air-Super-190 compressed air and the Mr. Pro-Spray Delux would be a useful set-up for simple airbrushing. Perhaps it would not require the same degree of ventilation that more robust systems would require, especially considering that I would be using acrylic paint. It would probably be less noisy than a standard airbrush.

I would appreciate comments and suggestions from anyone who has used this system.

Bob

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, September 9, 2022 4:56 PM

I used canned air when I was a kid with my Binks Wren airbrush.  Fumes will be the same so maybe outdoors/patio?  The canned air ices up pretty quick so you need to put it in a pot of warm water.  

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, September 9, 2022 6:48 PM

keavdog

I used canned air when I was a kid with my Binks Wren airbrush.  Fumes will be the same so maybe outdoors/patio?  The canned air ices up pretty quick so you need to put it in a pot of warm water.  

I started my airbrushing career with the Badger version of the above, but with the same results. Convenient and super-quiet...but that can will be half-frozen in a fairly short time in hot and humid conditions.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Saturday, September 10, 2022 5:27 AM

Same here, Badger starter kit with the can. Sprayed fine for about 3 minutes then the can froze up. So I converted an old propane tank ( a larger one about 12 gal maybe). Lots of trips to the shop to re air it but on average I could get a job done on a tank full of air. Then in 1977 I got the compressor, I still have that converted tank as well though. I suppose I actually could plumb my compressor through that tank for added storage. The tank has had so much over spray around it you can't read the gauge lol ( it was stored in my 1/1 paint shop for several years as well, so it's not all model over spray)..

My childhood found me spraying enamel rattle cans in my bedroom to an open window. Probably explains some things about my now 72 yo brain !! Then I got wise in the early 70's and discovered the wonders of a shrouded  exhaust fan in a window. Worked wonders and no I did not blow myself up. Even now while I have a booth I prefer shooting near a fan really, less dust sucked over my paint job.

But for acrylics in the winter I mostly justs spray into a kitchen trash can. You don't have to listen to me though, I'm from a different era and an old mountain man I suppose. We did whatever it took, small apartments would never stop me from painting, except 2K two part paints, I'm not that dumb yet.

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Saturday, September 10, 2022 12:49 PM

oldermodelguy

Same here, Badger starter kit with the can. Sprayed fine for about 3 minutes then the can froze up….

My childhood found me spraying enamel rattle cans in my bedroom to an open window. Probably explains some things about my now 72 yo brain !! Then I got wise in the early 70's and discovered the wonders of a shrouded  exhaust fan in a window. Worked wonders and no I did not blow myself up. Even now while I have a booth I prefer shooting near a fan really, less dust sucked over my paint job.

But for acrylics in the winter I mostly justs spray into a kitchen trash can….

 
Thank you everyone for your responses. It's looking, sorta, like the canned air and the kit I linked to above might be useful, but I'm not sure it's worth the cost and effort.
 
I've become reasonably adept at using both Tamiya acrylic sprays and paints. I've gotten good results using the rattle cans on small models (1/48 & 1/72 for aircraft, ca. 1/500 for ships). Painting small details and retouching small errors is tricky, but having never used an airbrush, I'm not sure that airbrushing would be an improvement. Modellers who use airbrushes often talk about painting fine details, but I'm not sure my almost-80-year-old hands and eyes could manage that. In addition, achieving microscopic detail is simply not worth the trouble for me. So, the question remains:
 
What would be the advantages, if any, for me, of using the airbrush set-up that I've described for the types of modelling I do?
 
Bob
 
   
 
 

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Saturday, September 10, 2022 2:46 PM

Recalling my jump from rattle cans to even the most basic (single action) AB, there's a world of difference!

Biggest thing is control...you move to thinking about where you really want to put the paint, instead of the eternal worry (with spray cans) about putting too much paint too fast all over everywhere. In fact, I'd say a basic AB set with propellant can is really the ideal way to dip your toe in, so to speak...you don't need to fret over pressure settings and such, and can really just get a feel for what the AB can do.

Give it a try. I think you'll be glad you did. Even if you decide not to use it for every project, I think you'll find it's a game-changer for some. Big SmileYes

Cheers

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Saturday, September 10, 2022 4:06 PM

This question occurs to me: for painting small areas and details on models, I'm used to mixing a few drops of acrylic paint with retarder to obtain paint that doesn't dry too quickly and will flow evenly. What's the minimum amount of paint to use for an air brush to operate? I'm concerned that a lot of expensive paint might be wasted.

Bob

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Saturday, September 10, 2022 10:14 PM

Thanks to Greg's comments, just above, I decided to order a Mr. Pro-Spray Delux kit to use with Tamiya acrylic paints. Wish me luck, I'll report on what I hope will be my success.

Bob

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Sunday, September 11, 2022 9:34 AM

Bobstamp
What's the minimum amount of paint to use for an air brush to operate? I'm concerned that a lot of expensive paint might be wasted.

With my Badger Anthem -- which feeds from a cup beneath, rather than being a gravity-feed with the cup mounted above -- I can spray down to (or with a minimum of) only about three drops. Virtually no waste.

(Since I mostly mix my own colors from Tamiya acrylics, rather than just 'washing out' the color cup, I'll often add a drop of thinner to whatever's left, and dump it into a spare empty bottle. There's a good chance even that few drops may come in handy for tinting later on.)

(I'll admit I'm cheap Big Smile...but it's also really efficient.)

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Monday, September 12, 2022 6:01 AM

One thing that is opened up to someone even with those beginner airbrush sets is the world of mixing paints, be that color mixing or simply the neccessary reducing/thinning. That can be fun or it can be your personal can of worms lol.

My guess is using the pressurized cans as your air supply will be short lived. To this day sometimes I'd still like one of those starter airbrushes though and I've been airbrushing since the 1970's. Rattle cans started around 1960 for me. Now I decant rattle cans to shoot through an airbrush on models to gain thinner coats and more control. It all comes with time though.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, September 12, 2022 6:48 AM

With most of the paints I airbrush with, I almost always put much more than I need into the color cup of my Paasche H.  Whatever is left over when I'm done gets returned to the bottle.  Really easy to do with MRP paints, since those are airbrush only...don't have to worry about a paint/thinner mix getting too thin for brushing.  When I was using mostly Tamiya paints, I would do the same thing.  The only difference there was in how I handled the paints that got airbrushed frequently, such as the two blacks and two whites.  I would keep the 10ml bottles of those separate for hand brushing, and use the 23ml bottles of each for airbrushing.  That way I could keep returning unused, thinned paint to the 23ml bottles without much concern over them getting too thin.

The little, paper bathroom cups make great paint mixing cups, BTW.  I use those all the time to get a good, even mix of thinner and paint, and I can check the consistency by seeing how fast a drop of paint runs down the inside of the cup.  After that, just crimp the lip of the cup to make a pour spout, and it goes right into the airbrush with no mess.

I'm like OMG with rattle cans.  I still use them, but never directly, they always get decanted into 4 ounce mason jars.  So much more control and MUCH better-looking paint work doing it that way...even the most delicate details are preserved.  Its my go-to method for using Tamiya's Grey Surface Primer cans.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Wednesday, September 14, 2022 7:11 PM

You guys are getting me kinda excisted about airbrushing! I never thought I'd see a way to make it useful, but you're getting me there. It's certainly true that rattlecans are extremely wasteful. And now...

Please offer some suggestions about small, quiet compressors that can be easily set up, probalby on the stove in my kitchen, and quickly put away. Money is not a problem. Well, money is always a problem, but my sensible wife and the VA have manged to give me a comfortale old age, speaking financially and not in terms of health, which is the pits!

Bob 

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, September 14, 2022 7:22 PM

Bob,

This is what I have been using.  I know the picture makes it look huge and possibly loud, but its small and quiet.  Putting it away somewhere is as easy as unplugging it and putting it away.  It comes with everything you need to get started right away...regulator, pressure gauge, and water trap are right there on it.  It automatically cycles on and off to keep pressure in the tank as you paint.  Take a look at the package dimensions in the Amazon listing to get a rough idea of size.  I keep mine next to my chair under the table I use for model building.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006ACB6D2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

For a good, easy-to-use and maintain airbrush...can't go wrong with the Paasche H.  Its all I have ever needed in an airbrush, and I have been using the same one for 35 years.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, September 15, 2022 5:58 AM

Bobstamp
Please offer some suggestions about small, quiet compressors that can be easily set up....

When I got back into the hobby after a break a bunch of years ago, I picked up one of those cheap 1/5 hp Chinese-made airbrush compressors on Ebay. (Same sort that's available at places like Harbor Freight.) For about (then) $35, I figured it would likely be noisy...and probably not last very long...but it came complete with gauge and regulator and a couple of hoses, and even if it lasted a year, it would get me going again.

(Plus, I'd dealt with the vendor before...and they had an excellent general rating...as well as a 60 day guarantee. I figured I'd 'crash test' it up front, to see what I'd let myself in for.)

Well...it turned out it was really solidly-built, and whisper-quiet -- quieter, in fact, than any of the 'name brand' compressors I'd owned previously -- and it's been chugging along continuously now (w/use on average every 2-3 weeks) for a decade plus. The only thing I had to do was find an adaptor for the odd-configuration hose I was using. (Maybe an extra $2.)

I'd be an idiot to claim my experience is maybe anything other than a crap-shoot...and for once, I may have gotten the lucky end of the stick...but it's a possible way to go. Inexpensive doesn't always mean garbage.

Cheers

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Thursday, September 15, 2022 6:25 AM

You don't want to know what I use lol !

However, besides that Master 4 cylinder posted above I think the Point Zero 2 cylinder 1/3hp with tank for around $117 is well worth a look at as well. I've had some Point Zero parts and pieces and they were always well made. For a little lighter duty work there is the Point Zero 1/5th HP single cylinder with tank for around $74. These can be found at Amazon. I'd stay clear of the ones with no tank regardless of the brand unless you intend to plumb through a tank.

 

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Thursday, September 15, 2022 12:16 PM

Has anyone mentioned the little compressor for painting fingernails?  Someone I know tried it out and said it works.  No regulator or moisture trap tho.  Might be good for a starter compressor for painting single colors, ie not doing camouflage or other intricate work.

My first "compressor" was the spare tire from my mother's car!  I pumped it up to about 60 PSI, which gave me maybe 15-20 minutes of use.  I got a good workout back in those days, using a big foot operated pump that was borrowed from my dad's car.  The tall Propel cans were about $6 back then, but when they hit $10, I went to the tire.

But the whole operation was really inconvenient, so when I entered college, I splurged and bought a Badger diaphram compressor.  I got a combo regulator/moisture trap from Sears rather than buying expensive Badger equivalents.  But it was a little noisy and didn't have a reservoir tank.

When I got out of college I could finally afford a silent compressor.  I bought a second hand one from one of the guys running the LHS and got many year's service from it.  It was so awesome to be able to quietly airbrush out in the patio at night, without annoying the neighbors.  I often ran past midnight, and sound really travels in the wee hours.

When the compressor's head gasket and pressure switch failed, I moved up to a compressor with a larger reservoir tank (tThe Mako Shark), which is what I use today.

Now, all that being said, a friend who lives in a small apartment brought over a Spray Works airbrushing rig that had everything you would need. I think the only limitation was that it didn't have an automatic shut-off switch.  But the system worked just fine and was very quiet.  Maybe it would be unsuitable for large jobs, but for small ones like 1/72 planes it worked great.

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Thursday, September 15, 2022 4:57 PM

The compressor required really depends on the airbrush max flow capability, needle size, project requirement, fluid viscosity of the paint and so on. A little over kill never hurts, having enough flow for fingernails and the minimum compressor requirement of say small models is fine right up till you need more and the compressor runs out of puffability lol.

 

  • Member since
    January 2019
Posted by Edwin on Friday, September 16, 2022 12:49 AM

Bobstamp

This question occurs to me: for painting small areas and details on models, I'm used to mixing a few drops of acrylic paint with retarder to obtain paint that doesn't dry too quickly and will flow evenly. What's the minimum amount of paint to use for an air brush to operate? I'm concerned that a lot of expensive paint might be wasted.

Bob

 

Hi Bob

I tried that airbrush many years ago

Due to it using a bottle and siphon tube, you might encounter paint wastage unless you pour unused paint back into the paint bottle, which may result in other issues. 

You need enough paint in the airbrush bottle, as the bottom of that siphon tube needs to remain submerged for it to work.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Friday, September 16, 2022 5:10 AM

Yes,that's why I use a gravity fed airbrush,it operates on very little paint,just drops are needed for a quick spray of sonething.No jar or siphon tube to clean either.

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Friday, September 16, 2022 7:20 AM

I have two siphon fed airbrushes and one gravity. The siphen with bottle is good for larger volumes of paint where you mix up a few bottles or one larger one. But to get it to act more like the gravity guns for quick clean up right to the bottom of the cup I use a metal side cup on each one for the smaller jobs. I like these single action guns on models. My gravity gun is double action, I use it more in art work and on T Shirts etc. I don't recall ever painting model parts with it. I've also always used single action on models so that plays into this as a go with what you know theory perhaps.. My all time favorite model airbrush is without question the old original design Badger 200, it has sweet atomization and multi needle sizes. But I probably use my Paasche H most for it's simplicity. Certainly for the heavier paints the H prevails, though the 200 will do that as well..

The only thing that won't spray out the side cup is the residue, so basically no mess or excess left that cleaner and back flushing won't get out. The metal side cups are tapered like the gravity cups are.

None the less all this is moot for the starter airbrushes, they are what they are.

 

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Saturday, October 1, 2022 10:15 PM

Thanks to everyone for their helpful comments. I've tried the Mr. Pro-Spray Delux on a mule and was pleased with the result. I'll let you know how my first "serious" use turns out (the "cockpit green" interior of the cockpit and fuselage of the TBM-3E I've started.)

Bob

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Sunday, October 2, 2022 3:27 AM

Congratulations on your new airbrush, Bob! It's agreat tool and I think it will allow to develop your modelling skills even further! Good luck with it and have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Sunday, October 2, 2022 10:31 PM

Quick note to everyone: I used my Mr. Pro-Spray Delux airbrush today, using thinned Tamiya cockpit green acrylic paint for the interior of the TBM-3E I'm building. Wow! Easy peevy from beginning to clean-up. I'm sold. Thank you all for your support and suggestions!

Bob 

 

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Monday, October 3, 2022 12:10 PM

Glad to hear it's going well for you, that's awesome !

  • Member since
    July 2019
  • From: Vancouver, British Columbia
Posted by Bobstamp on Monday, January 2, 2023 2:10 PM

As those who who have been following this discussion know, I did buy the Mr. Pro-Spray Delux airbrush, and I'm glad that I did. It's been much easier to use than I anticipated. My biggest concern was space to use it, since I live in a small apartment. I decided to build my own airbrush "studio" out of a large cardboard box to use on the kitchen stove with — obviously! — the burners and oven turned off and the exhaust fan over the stove on high. Here's what it looks like in use:

DIY airbrush set-up

I plan to use only acrylic paints, and for the time being I'll paint smaller areas — odor and overspray aren't a problem at all, and I'm amazed at how little paint is used and how much control I have.

Thanks to everyone who has offered suggestions and opinions. I think that my Mr. Spray Delux was the best purchase I could have made to advance my modelling skills.

And happy new year! I certainly hope that 2023 turns out better than 2022, both for the world and for me and my family; both my wife and I had Covid in early November, and I wouldn't wish that on anyone. I've never been sicker, and only narrowly missed being hospitalized. 

On the bench: 1/72 Grumman Avenger being kitbashed as a U.S. Forest Service tanker; a diorama to illustrate the crash of a Beech T-34B Mentor which I survived in 1962 (I'm using Minicraft's 1/48 model of the Mentor), and a Pegasus model of the submarine Nautilus of 20,000 Leagues Under the Seas fame. 

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