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Electric drill

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  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Electric drill
Posted by wpwar11 on Friday, October 14, 2022 7:36 PM

I'm considering buying an electric drill.  I think it will be useful for drilling out 1/48 and 1/32 exhaust, griding out material for aftermarket products, and just faster and more efficient drilling needs.  Probably something that can accommodate a small bit.  Can anyone suggest a quality tool?

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Friday, October 14, 2022 7:38 PM

Dremel is always a good tool for the hobbiest.  I have had issues with RPMs melting plastic though

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    April 2009
  • From: Longmont, Colorado
Posted by Cadet Chuck on Friday, October 14, 2022 7:59 PM

Dremels run way too fast for drilling on models.  Check out the big box hardware stores, or Micro-Mark.  Or an electric screw driver would also be slow enough for this job.

Gimme a pigfoot, and a bottle of beer...

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Building models on my kitchen counter top~somewhere in North Carolina
Posted by disastermaster on Friday, October 14, 2022 9:37 PM

I only use a pinvise and it always turns out well......   it's not that hard.

A power tool for a small part is most likely asking for trouble

On the kitchen counter somewhere in North Carolina

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, October 15, 2022 7:54 AM

Electric drills definitely have good uses for modeling, but drilling holes isn't really one of those uses.  But, I would still highly recommend getting a good quality cordless drill for other things in modeling.  I use my Dewalt DCD710 all the time, mostly as a sanding tool for the insides of jet intakes.  You can put all kinds of things in the chuck, such as round needle files, as well as hardwood dowels.  What I have done to make sanding/polishing tools for use with my drill is to cut 1/4" strips of MicroMesh sheets from 1500 to 12000 grit, and I wrapped each strip, helically, around a 1/4" hardwood dowel, using 3M 1300L adhesive.  I just mark each dowel with a fine-tipped Sharpie so I know which grit is which in the set of dowels.  The drill has 2 maximum speeds (but the speed is fully variable by how far you pull the trigger), so I put it on the slowest speed and sand the seams on the insides of 2-piece jet intake, going progressively finer on the grit until the inside is smooth and polished, usually with no visible seam.  Drills run slow enough for that task so you don't overheat the plastic (as long as you don't stay in one spot for too long, of course).  Dewalt doesn't make the DCD710 anymore, so it looks like the DCD780 is its successor.  Great little drill, and I use mine every day at work...as well as using it at home.

Now, for drilling holes in small things like 1/48 and 1/32 exhausts, here is what I use.  I have found no need to chuck them up in anything, not even a pin vise.  They are exteremely sharp and start cutting immediately, and I find it sufficient to just put the blunt end of the bit against my index finger, and just use my thumb and middle finger to twirl the bit.  In my case, I'm not drilling out exhausts, but I have a method now of mounting ordnance by drilling tiny holes (usually 0.3mm) and using 0.3mm round copper beams as pins to mount ordnance with.  Makes a much cleaner and more reliable/less frustrating way of hanging bombs, missiles, rocket pods, MERs, TERs, fuel tanks, etc.  At any rate, these two drill sets will serve you well in your drilling adventures. 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C5S3FM2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C5PWSXR/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Saturday, October 15, 2022 8:38 AM

Thanks for the tool and technique help.  very helpful.  

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, October 15, 2022 9:10 AM

Chiming in late here, but I agree with the majority above, Paul.

Power tools used on models hasn't worked out well for me either. That said, i do have a Dremel variable speed, and to address your question, which wasn't 'is this good idea' (Smile), I'd go with a variable speed Dremel of some sort. Slowest lowest RPM you can find, the better.

-Greg

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Saturday, October 15, 2022 9:13 AM

There is a recent model of Dremel, the Stylus- my model number is 2600. Searching today I could not find one on google so they may have a new model.  It is an AC model, very small and light.  It is low torque, so the pressure you use is more of a control of speed than the speed control.  It is definitly good on styrene, grinding or drilling.

 

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Saturday, October 15, 2022 11:19 AM

Eaglecash867

Electric drills definitely have good uses for modeling, but drilling holes isn't really one of those uses.  

***

At any rate, these two drill sets will serve you well in your drilling adventures. 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C5S3FM2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07C5PWSXR/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

If you have a Harbor Freight Tools nearby, similar bits and burrs are available.  I use them in a hand held vice.    A power tool with a small drill bit is a sure fire recipe for breakage.

That being said, check the local big-box store for a Dremel pumpkin carving tool.   It is the right season.   I picked one up a few years back after the holiday at a deep discount.  It has the same 1/8 inch collet as other Dremel tools.   It uses 4X AA batteries in a removable power pack.   It has two speeds, both are too fast for use on styrene, but will turn slower if you use older batteries.    It is an acceptable tool if you don't mind the Jack-o-lantern logo.    Mostly I use it with a grinding burr, not a drill

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, October 15, 2022 11:42 AM

EdGrune
I use them in a hand held vice.    A power tool with a small drill bit is a sure fire recipe for breakage.

That was already covered in my post.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Saturday, October 15, 2022 1:16 PM

FWIW, Tamiya makes a neat little battery-powered hobby drill that has served me well for years. Despite its admittedly 'cheapo' look -- and the fact that it requires (minimal) assembly -- it's pretty much perfect for plastic models, with plenty of power at slow-enough speeds to a) not screw up your plastic, and b) make using tinier-sized drill bits entirely feasable. Ordinary penlight-type batteries last nearly forever.

It's more expensive than it used to be -- what isn't? -- but it's a great-quality tool that's ideal for model building.

Just my 2 cents.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    June 2009
Posted by bigbluejavelin on Saturday, October 15, 2022 1:24 PM

I suggest the Tamiya electric handy drill. Low speed, light weight, runs on 2 AA batteries. Plus it is actually a kit, so you get to build it too. Oops, must not have seen the reply above!Embarrassed

  • Member since
    July 2013
Posted by steve5 on Saturday, October 15, 2022 4:14 PM

I have 2 of these drills , they are the perfect tool , for modelling. 

 

  • Member since
    March 2022
  • From: Twin cities, MN
Posted by missileman2000 on Sunday, October 16, 2022 12:51 PM

missileman2000

There is a recent model of Dremel, the Stylus- my model number is 2600. Searching today I could not find one on google so they may have a new model.  It is an AC model, very small and light.  It is low torque, so the pressure you use is more of a control of speed than the speed control.  It is definitly good on styrene, grinding or drilling.

 

 

I made an excuse in the model number- it is 2050.  I bought a set of Dremel chucks- regular through a complete closing one, so I can chuck almost any drill or attachment in it now.

 

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Sunday, October 16, 2022 2:49 PM

On vacation sitting on the beach in Outter Banks, NC.  Decided to come over here and check out what people are saying.  Just bought a Tamiya drill so I'll give that a try.  Pretty cool that one can come here get ideas and make a purchase all in a minute or two.  

  • Member since
    April 2016
  • From: N. Burbs of ChiKawgo
Posted by GlennH on Monday, October 17, 2022 5:11 PM

disastermaster

I only use a pinvise and it always turns out well......   it's not that hard.

A power tool for a small part is most likely asking for trouble

 

Reminds me of something I read once in a book about selling once. The average person going to the store is not buying a drill, they are buying a hole.

A number Army Viet Nam scans from hundreds yet to be done:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/southwestdreams/albums/72157621855914355

Have had the great fortune to be on every side of the howitzers.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, October 18, 2022 12:14 PM

I prefer to use a pin vise for drilling on a model, whether styrene, resin, or metal.  If I slip, there is not nearly as much power behind the tool to cause a lot of damage.  With a motor tool, you can ruin the piece.

If you do decide to use a powered drill, you might consider investing in a drill press stand for it.  Dremel makes one for its rotary tools, for example.  That way, you can ensure that the bit is drilling as straight as possible along the hole's center line, reducing the chances of slipping and damaging the piece and the bit.

As for RPMs, I have seen examples where the modeler ran the tool through a transformer, such as the ones used on model railroad sets, to adjust the speed beyond any variable settings on the tool itself.

But I'll stick with my pin vise.  It may take longer, but it's not that much longer.  It's more comfortable for me.

Best regards,

Brad

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, October 18, 2022 4:12 PM

AHA!

       I have a RYOBI Geared Drill Impact driver. The thing goes so slow I can very easily drill Tail pipes and Large 1/350 guns with it. YES! Still gotta be careful. I have found for sure in all the years messing with these model things ,Ya can't beat a Swivel ball handled Pin Vise!

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