SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Is Dremel really worth it?

7231 views
23 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Portugal
Is Dremel really worth it?
Posted by lito.sf on Friday, March 5, 2004 10:35 PM
Hello all,
I´m thinking of buying a dremel tool, does it realy worth the money it cost?Question [?]
And they have a lot of diferent alternatives wich one is best for modeling?
Thanks alotSmile [:)]
Lito
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, March 5, 2004 10:58 PM
A router or similar is a handy tool.

Doesn't have to be a Dremel but can be any maker. I have attached a pic of mine below:


It is rather small, has no external tranformer, takes bits from 0.2mm ~ 3.2mm, adjustable speed 3.000 ~ 13.000rpm.

Things I consider important:
1.) Choice & availability of good bits for sanding, drilling, polishing, etc.
2.) Adjustable speed.
3.) Small and lightweight.

My pevious one was way larger and too heavy I had to get a flexshaft so that I could do things properly.

But Opinions and suggestions will vary, best is try to handle a few different ones and choose the one that suits your needs and feels comfortable.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Friday, March 5, 2004 11:01 PM
I have never tried any other models so I can't give you much info on them. However I have my handy-dandy Dremel Multi-Pro and I love the little bugger to death. I use it quite often in my modeling. Just have to be very carefull because even at its lowest speed, you will melt the plastic if you get in a hurry. When drilling with mine i go very slowly. drilling a little at a time. It's slower than drilling wood with a Black and Decker but faster than a twist drill in my opinion. And it also had a million other uses around the house other than modeling.
  • Member since
    November 2003
  • From: Stockton CA USA
Posted by roosterfish on Saturday, March 6, 2004 9:42 AM
I have two Dremels. The top-of-the-line one with all the accessories and a little MiniMite. The big one gathers dust and little MiniMite (MM) gets all the use. MM is a lot slower, has two speeds, is rechargeable and does not go fast enough to melt plastic. Even my big Dremels slowest speed will melt plastic into gobs. Minimite gets all the use and I would easily recommend it for model making.
Winners never quit; quitters never win.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Saturday, March 6, 2004 11:12 AM
I have the Sears model which has a cord.


It comes in handy at times although I think the cordless Mini-Mite that roosterfish mentioned would probably be the best choice for modeling.

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Central USA
Posted by qmiester on Saturday, March 6, 2004 12:08 PM
I have two Dremels, one is a cord operated variable speed, the other a Mini-Mite and I wouldn't be without either of them. The Mini-Mite is much better for use with plastics but the standard Dremel is great for other media (especially for cutting metal - ever tried to cut a hypodermic needle to length for a gun barrel by using a needle file?)

Having said that I would recommend getting a small battery powered drill such as the Mini-Mite. And buy an extra battery for it cause it's really frustrating to get a project nearly done and have the battery go south on it. Then its two to three hrs before you can start again. In addition the Mini-Mite will be somewhat cheaper. Around here, a Mini-Mite with accessories and a spare battery will be under 50 bucks, Whereas a 110v Dremel (single speed) with accessories will start somewhere around 50 bucks.

No matter what type or brand you buy, just remember to budget enough money to get a good pair of eye protection goggles and always use them
Quincy
  • Member since
    December 2002
  • From: Third rock from the sun.
Posted by Woody on Saturday, March 6, 2004 12:42 PM
I don't know how I'd get along without my Flexi-shaft Dremel or my Minimite. I end up using my Minimite for short quick uses and the bigger machine for larger projects. I have also added the optional chuck to my Minimite and it is that much handier. I think you gain speed and precision with the use of the dremel(or dremel style) tools.

" I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harm's way." --John Paul Jones
  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Warwick, RI
Posted by paulnchamp on Saturday, March 6, 2004 6:01 PM
A Dremel (or equivalent motor tool) is worth it's weight in gold. I started with the Mini-Mite, which I still have and use, and recently got a Multi-Pro. They're both great. If you're on a tighter budget, get the Mini-Mite. It's a perfect starter and will handle a great many of your modeling needs. You won't regret it.
Paul "A man's GOT to know his limitations."
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Portugal
Posted by lito.sf on Saturday, March 6, 2004 8:06 PM
Thanks guys, as always you are my conscience!
What would i do without this forum?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 8, 2004 8:23 PM
I use my mini-mite so much I went out and got another. I don't even use my full-size dremel on my plastic models anymore.
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Tochigi, Japan
Posted by J-Hulk on Tuesday, March 9, 2004 12:11 PM
Can't comment on the Dremel brand products, but as MadModelFactory has already mentioned, the new Wave HandyRouter is a gem, and at about $58 USD, certainly worth the expenditure.
~Brian
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 9, 2004 5:11 PM
Dremel is certainly worth the investment. I've tried lower-cost subsitutes over the years, but found that they do not hold up, won't accept the sometime needed Dremel tools,r adaptors or accessories, or don't have adequate repair or replacement parts options that are available with Dremel.

I've been using the Flexi-Shaft with foot-control speed controller and the Multi-Pro, but I never tried the Mini-Mite because I've been been satisfied using my old Exacto battery-operated tool.

"Should we prosper it shall be as is our custom...by Miracle!"
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Portugal
Posted by lito.sf on Tuesday, March 9, 2004 6:04 PM
is that andyrouter for sale online?

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 9, 2004 6:19 PM
I noticed that Rainbow Ten got it listed, but you might be able to ask Hobby Link japan too to get it for you.

http://www.rainbowten.co.jp/english/

As follows: 1011810138151,WAVE, ,6800yen,HT-151 Handy Router Mk.1
Electricity specs are: 100V 50/60W (it is a corded one)
The Router comes with a set of 8 tips.
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Wednesday, March 10, 2004 1:12 PM
Hi -

I've been using Dremel tools for about thirty years now, and can't imagine building models without them (or something similar). Some of my friends disagree vociferously, but when newcomers to the hobby ask me what their first major tool acquisition should be, I always suggest a Dremel tool (or something similar).

I have, however, always had one complaint about Dremel Moto-Tools. Whenever Dremel brings out a new product, the advertising emphasizes how fast and powerful it is compared to the last one. To the model builder, both those attributes are just about irrelevant - except that to anybody working with plastic, slower is better.

My first Dremel tool was a 1975-vintage single-speed one, which I promptly discovered was too fast for any civilized modeling purpose. So I bought a hand-operated speed control for it. With that contraption I could dial in a speed of zero, put a stationary drill bit down exactly where I wanted it on the workpiece, and, by turning the dial, gradually ramp up the speed till it was just what I wanted. That, to my notion, is the way to use such a tool.

Unfortunately the company seems to have quit making single-speed Moto-Tools. The dial-operated speed control also seems to have bitten the dust (though I believe the foot-operated one is still available). The current built-in speed controls are nice and handy, but they don't go down to zero. (If I remember right, the slowest speed on most of the newer models is 5000 rpm. That's just about slow enough to drill a clean hole in a piece of styrene IF the drill bit is nice and sharp. But a slightly dull bit will produce a gooey mess. I speak from experience.)

My current favorite Dremel equivalent for most model-related jobs is one that I got from Woodcraft. (That, incidentally, is a fine source of tools and materials, geared mainly toward woodworkers but incorporating all sorts of stuff that's useful for modelers as well. The website is <www.woodcraft.com>.) The manufacturer is a German firm called We-Cheer, and the tool is about a third as big and heavy as the smallest corded Dremel. It has only one speed (too fast), but works great when I plug it into the good ol' Dremel speed control. Dremel chucks work perfectly in it. It feels almost like a pencil in the hand, has a lightweight cord that comes out the back end, and costs something in the neighborhood of $25.00. I still keep my fairly modern, variable-speed Dremel on the workbench for heavy-duty work (e.g., in the router attachment), and I like my Dremel Mini-Mite for all sorts of stuff, but I recommend the We-Cheer for general modeling purposes.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 15, 2004 11:19 AM
I have a Dremel, but I also have a regulator, I can dial it up to high speed or down to a relatively slow speed.

As far as need? It depends on you. Hobby stores have parts for them to Grind, sand, drill or cut or buff. That's pretty nice for a tool that is the same size as or smaller than a bottle of pop.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 15, 2004 2:15 PM
me: I have this cheapass $10 hobbystore knockoff dremel that runs on 2 aa's. If anyone is intrested in an unopened one, contact me
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 5:55 PM
Hi everyone, with regards to single speed dremel type tools, could anyone suggest a reliable/efficient source for a manual speed control? According to the manual it should be a full wave speed control or the tool will be damaged. Many thanks.
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Greenville, NC
Posted by jtilley on Tuesday, March 23, 2004 8:33 PM
Thanos asks a good question regarding speed controls. I'm not sure of the answer; would that Dremel had not taken its own dial-operated speed control off the market. I have two of them, both more than 20 years old and working perfectly.

Woodworking catalogs (such as Woodcraft, Rockler, and Lee Valley) offer speed controls designed primarily for routers. I suspect one of those would work fine - but they tend to be pretty expensive. Another possibility might be the Foredom line. Foredom makes heavy-duty rotary carving tools, and I believe offers at least one foot-operated speed control. I imagine that would work on a Dremel tool.

To repeat the plaintive wail I submitted last week - I wish Dremel would pay more attention to the needs of the model builder. We don't need more speed and more power (the two attributes with which Dremel currently seems to be obsessed). We need a precision chuck, light weight, good bearings, and, above all else, speeds that can be adjusted down to (or near) zero. Make a rotary tool with a chuck that will handle everything from a #80 drill bit to a 1/8" shaft, a diameter like a pencil, and a built-in speed control with a range of 0 to 1000 rpm, and the modeling world will beat a path to your door. It seems like such a machine shouldn't be beyond the capacity of modern technology.

Youth, talent, hard work, and enthusiasm are no match for old age and treachery.

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, March 24, 2004 9:58 PM
your best bet is with the Dremel. I have a knock off one from Pep Boys Automotive. and it blows. it works when it wants too. so I have to save up for a Dremel. so get one quickly.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 17, 2004 2:18 PM
I have a minimite and it is just perfect. i didn't mind the price for the drill itself but for the accesories good grief talk about expensive.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, May 17, 2004 10:29 PM
what's the main function of dremel? is it for drilling holes or sanding?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 1:16 PM
Rotary Tools can be used for just about anything from what I've seen.(with the right attachment, of course) -cutting, polishing, carving, engraving, routing, sanding, grinding, sharpening.....Tongue [:P]

Hey you guys,
What's the price of the Mini Mite? I have the 5-speed and a 1-speed. The 1 needs new brushes though, so I've never used it. Is it slower than the 5-speed or is it still 5,000 rpm? The 5 worked great last night on the brass tubes for my current project. I still gotta figure out the best bit for styrene though. Any suggestions?
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: SO CAL
Posted by cplchilly on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 11:18 PM
Thanos you can go to rockler.com its a wood working tool supplie for your speed control, I believe it is a full wave and it only costs about 20-30 bucks. They are made for single speed routers and are quite durable. Jtilley I know what you mean I've had mine dial Dremel for almost 20 years and the only proboblem I've had was when the little plate fell off the dial and glued it back on and it's been there for about 15 years.
[img]http://members.fcc.net/ice9/badge.jpg
JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.