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Lamps & Lighting

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  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: Alice Springs Australia
Lamps & Lighting
Posted by tweety1 on Saturday, March 20, 2004 8:19 PM
Hey all!

I was just wondering what everyone used for their lighting on hobby benches.

How many of you use a flouro, and how many use an incandescent bulb?
Me, I use 22 watt round flouro, with built in magnifier which I modified to accept different lenses, it is on a rotating platform in the middle of my bench, which is handy seeing as my bench is 6' long.

I do find that the flouro does make weathering etc a little difficult to get accurate, and need to constantly use sunlight from the window so I can see the 'natural' look.

I have also seen adverts stating flouro lights that output a 'natural' light, has anyone got one of these? If so, how true is it?

Thanks

Sean
--Sean-- If you are driving at the speed of light and you turn on the headlights, what happens???
  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posted by uilleann on Saturday, March 20, 2004 8:29 PM
The full spectrum florescents aren't all that and a bag-o-chips...at least not the one's I've seen. They are a bit better at toning down the harsh blue light from standard tubes though. I still prefer incandecents, but now find that I like the "Reveal" type bulbs. These are incandecents that have a light bluish coloring to the glass and they afford a "whiter" light than standards.

Kinda the reverse of the tube light idea.

Anyway, there is no replacement for good ol' sunlight, but you may also want to cinsider the type of lighting in which the model is most likely going to be displayed. You can then alter colors accordingly if needed.

B~
"I may not fly with the eagles.....but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!"
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Saturday, March 20, 2004 9:15 PM
I use a swing arm lamp with a 100 watt incandescent bulb like this:



Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Brooklyn
Posted by wibhi2 on Sunday, March 21, 2004 9:11 AM
Incandescent lamps are in the yellow spectrum
Fluorescent have a tenndency to be in the green spectrum, while the daylight and full spectrum bulbs are in the red/pink spectrum.

I use 12V mr16 quartz halgeon lights to light my bench. They are the closest to "white" as you are going to get.

There are other things that affect the general light spectrum that your eye picks up - light reflected off glossy surfaces ie: a stained oak table top will reflect browish yellow light.
3d modelling is an option a true mental excercise in frusrtation
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, March 22, 2004 1:43 PM
I also use a swing arm lamp. Mine is old and the weighted base has broken, so I have mounted it on a 2x4 with a couple of "C"clamps to the table.

As long as it keeps working, I will keep using it.

Also, since my workspace is small, I also use my paintbooth's lights. They are the Halogen type that mount under kitchen cabinets. As I have said elsewhere, they are great for drying.

--------------------------
Sorry, didn't read the entire question. I guess since I am not looking for accuracy, I do not have lights that would fit the question.
  • Member since
    February 2003
Posted by Jim Barton on Friday, March 26, 2004 11:10 AM
When I moved to Phoenix, my former roommate gave me a swing-arm lamp similar to the one pictured above. I'm currently using a 60-watt incandescent bulb in it, but someday, I'd like to try those "Reveal" bulbs; I've heard they're great!

"Whaddya mean 'Who's flying the plane?!' Nobody's flying the plane!"

  • Member since
    January 2003
  • From: Warwick, RI
Posted by paulnchamp on Friday, March 26, 2004 7:40 PM
I have two swing-arm lamps on my workbench, each with a "Reveal" bulb in them, and they're great.
Paul "A man's GOT to know his limitations."
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Friday, March 26, 2004 7:52 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Jim Barton

When I moved to Phoenix, my former roommate gave me a swing-arm lamp similar to the one pictured above. I'm currently using a 60-watt incandescent bulb in it, but someday, I'd like to try those "Reveal" bulbs; I've heard they're great!


Jim,

Since you mentioned it I want to try them too.
They sound great here:
http://www.gelighting.com/na/reveal/media_faqs.html

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, March 27, 2004 11:05 AM
When I'm modeling at the kitchen table I have one 60w incandescent overhead and 5 windows covering 3 sides. When I'm working in the garage on my RR layout I have a 2-tube 48" fluorescent overhead and in the shop I have two 2-tube 48" fluorescents over the workbench. My 5x swing arm magnifier has dual fluorescents - one on each side of the lens.

The 5x mag. and bright light helps this old guy see better. Big Smile [:D]

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Saturday, March 27, 2004 8:14 PM
Jim,

I did a search with Google and found a link to a post that someone was complaining about the 100 watt Reveal bulbs not lasting very long. I wonder how long they do last?

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, March 30, 2004 2:27 PM
in addition to 100 watt standard garage lighting for the room, I use a head lamp that I picked up for about $10 at my local department store. It is incandescent, and runs on 2 AA batteries. The only short-coming is the fact that it FLIES through the batteries. This being said, I love the hands free ability to maneuver it in order to see in the weird little nooks and crannies that we all have had to deal with!
  • Member since
    February 2003
Posted by Jim Barton on Thursday, April 1, 2004 11:44 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by MikeV

Jim,

I did a search with Google and found a link to a post that someone was complaining about the 100 watt Reveal bulbs not lasting very long. I wonder how long they do last?

Mike


Well, they are GE light bulbs, and as a general rule, GE light bulbs don't last to begin with. In my old apartment, I was forever changing the light bulbs in the bedroom fixture, and these were plain old 60 watt bulbs. Shoot, David Letterman for years has made cracks about GE light bulbs in his "Top Ten" lists.

"Whaddya mean 'Who's flying the plane?!' Nobody's flying the plane!"

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posted by zokissima on Thursday, April 1, 2004 12:06 PM
I just use a swing-arm lamp with a 100w bulb. It's been fine for me. Provides more than enough light!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Thursday, April 1, 2004 2:06 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Jim Barton


Well, they are GE light bulbs, and as a general rule, GE light bulbs don't last to begin with. In my old apartment, I was forever changing the light bulbs in the bedroom fixture, and these were plain old 60 watt bulbs. Shoot, David Letterman for years has made cracks about GE light bulbs in his "Top Ten" lists.


Thanks Jim.
I wasn't aware of that fact. Big Smile [:D]
I am still going to try some as the yellow light spectrum of regular incandescent bulbs can make colors look off when they are not.

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Central USA
Posted by qmiester on Saturday, April 3, 2004 10:34 AM
My hobby room has three 4 foot fluorescent fixtures but my modeling desk is equipped with 3 swing arm lamps with 100W incandescents. (really cuts down on shadows and the local dime store sells them for 9 bucks). Also have a magnifying lamp with a 75W bulb in it that I switch with one of the swing arms when I want to do close up work. Like the set up very much but have to keep a small (6") oscillating fan running if I'm going to work more than an hour. (Heat ya know).
Quincy
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Saturday, April 10, 2004 2:18 AM
I picked up a 4-pack of the 100 watt G.E. "Reveal" bulbs today and I like them.
It is hard getting used to the light not being "yellow" now though. Big Smile [:D]

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    March 2004
  • From: Salt Lake City, Utah
Posted by uilleann on Saturday, April 10, 2004 9:12 AM
The wattage of a bulb will affect how long it burns, as will the composition of the filament and the nature of the gasses used inside the bulb. The "reveal" bulbs don't do anything special that should drastically change how long they burn so far as I am able to tell. The do incorperate the use of neodymium in their elements according to the website, but all the Reveal bulbs I ever used seemed to add their bluish hue to the light by the very obvious blue cast of the glass!

Anyway, I've used Reveal bulbs around my home for the past five years and never had issues with them burning out yet...in fact apart from those that were damaged in a move or two, or perhaps buying a new size to fit the new bathroom fixtures etc. I've never needed to replace one yet - I just take them with me if I move. Approve [^]

I would think that for an incandecent, these would make a great choice to model with.

Bri~
"I may not fly with the eagles.....but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines!"
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: Hayward, CA
Posted by MikeV on Saturday, April 10, 2004 10:37 AM
Brian,

Thanks for that information.

Mike

Wisdom is the right use of knowledge. To know is not to be wise. Many men know a great deal, and are all the greater fools for it. There is no fool so great a fool as a knowing fool. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. " Charles Spurgeon
  • Member since
    February 2003
Posted by Jim Barton on Monday, May 3, 2004 4:41 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by Jim Barton

When I moved to Phoenix, my former roommate gave me a swing-arm lamp similar to the one pictured above. I'm currently using a 60-watt incandescent bulb in it, but someday, I'd like to try those "Reveal" bulbs; I've heard they're great!



Finally did it! Bought some of those "Reveal" light bulbs I've been wanting to get, and after several modeling sessions using the bulbs, I must say I like them!Cool [8D] Aside from the whiter light, I think using the "Reveal" bulb reduces eyestrain a tad. One caveat: "Reveal" bulbs are definitely dimmer than regular light bulbs of the same wattage; you may want to switch to the next higher-wattage bulb. (This might pose a problem if you're already using the maximum recommended wattage for a given fixture.) That aside, I do recommend the "Reveal" bulb.

"Whaddya mean 'Who's flying the plane?!' Nobody's flying the plane!"

  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 4, 2004 1:57 AM
You all are lucky , I use a MAG light ! J/K , I use an swing type lamp like Mike's with a magnifier built into it and I put a reveal 75 watt bulb in it , I also use a overhead flouresent lamp and a regular lamp , But for real I also use a mini MAG light with the mono fillament adapter to look in hand to see areas .

Walt
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, May 4, 2004 1:37 PM
Sean,

I have dual 4 foot flour over the bench and circular lamp like you have on the bench. In the light above the bench I put in a cool white and a hot to get both the reds and blues from the lamp. Using just one or the other can sometimes cause problems as to how they make your paint look.

Regards,
Richard
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Where the coyote howl, NH
Posted by djrost_2000 on Wednesday, May 5, 2004 1:08 AM
For most of my model building work I use a 100W incandescent. For color matching and/or painting miniatures I use two fold-up Ott-lights.

Dave
  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: Alice Springs Australia
Posted by tweety1 on Wednesday, May 5, 2004 8:23 AM
I'm actually in the process of redesigning my hobby bench.

Part of the plan is to use a collection of lights to try and generate the correct amount of natural light as if the window was open.

Because 90% of my modeling is done after everyone is asleep, it is an essential that the lighting is spot on.

Plus the fact my current workspace doesn't have enough nooks and crannys in which to store/lose stuffBig Smile [:D]
--Sean-- If you are driving at the speed of light and you turn on the headlights, what happens???
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