SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

What is the oldest tool you own for modeling? (Not your hands!)

1686 views
39 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Saturday, January 21, 2023 10:18 AM

GMorrison

Morrison's Second Law of Modeling:

 "No matter the size of the bench; the available work space will always be exactly two square feet". 

In Japan it is 20cm x 20cm (less than 10"x10").  Japanese apartments are small!

So is the First Law of Modeling "A hobby knife dropped will always land tip first on your foot or floor"?

And which law states "A dropped detail part will never be found until you stop looking for it"?

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, January 21, 2023 10:50 AM

Tim Kidwell

Armornut, Eaglecash, and Missileman: Cool! Care to share photos of the lovelies?

 

Here's my workhorse, the Paasche H.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    May 2011
  • From: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posted by Real G on Saturday, January 21, 2023 1:33 PM

plasticjunkie
 
Real G

I purchased my Badger AB in 1976 at Orange Blossom Hobbies in Miami. Still runs like new. 

Yeah, stuff was built to last back then.  My Badger has been in continuous use for over 40 years, and I've only replaced the paint cup once (chrome plating wore off), the air valve twice (I inadvertently damaged them with solvent while cleaning), and the medium head and needle once (dropped them).  I also had to replace the air hose twice due to age.

I DID buy many replacement nylon gaskets due to them getting lost while cleaning.  I once forgot to take it off and pressed the trigger while cleaning, and saw the gasket fly into the yard (I paint in the patio), never to be seen again.

My airbrush saw several compressors come and go (Propel cans, my mom's car spare tire(!), a reciprocating diaphram model, and two silent models.

It has also survived attempted successors, including an Aztek (really hated it!) and a Iwata double action.  I use the Iwata from time to time, but I like my 40 year old Badger single action.  The Iwata is a fine precision instrument, but I can strip and clean the Badger in the dark with my eyes closed.

"This is my airbrush.  There are others like it but this one is mine..."

“Ya ya ya, unicorn papoi!”

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: Building models on my kitchen counter top~somewhere in North Carolina
Posted by disastermaster on Saturday, January 21, 2023 2:12 PM

Most of my dad's watch maker tools.

He was a watchmaker, not repair man.

But he was a repair man as a medic in the Philippines campaign.

On the kitchen counter somewhere in North Carolina

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, January 23, 2023 8:00 AM

GMorrison
 

Morrison's Second Law of Modeling:

"No matter the size of the bench; the available work space will always be exactly two square feet"...

Or less Wink

 

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2016
Posted by scaler on Monday, January 23, 2023 7:13 PM

the Baron

 

 
GMorrison
 

Morrison's Second Law of Modeling:

"No matter the size of the bench; the available work space will always be exactly two square feet"...

 

 

Or less Wink

 

 

 

 

Those sagging shelves are about to collapse!

Some think this is actually fun!
  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Tuesday, January 24, 2023 9:23 AM

scaler
 
the Baron 
 
GMorrison
 

Morrison's Second Law of Modeling:

"No matter the size of the bench; the available work space will always be exactly two square feet"...

 

 

Those sagging shelves are about to collapse! 

Yeah, I was surprised that the plywood bowed like that, as fast as it did.  I installed that hutch back in March 2020, and the shelves are 3/4" plywood.

The shelves are supported at the middle in the back by a brace with horizontal cleats. They're the same as the side supports.

Though, much of what's in those boxes is my gray army.  I'm going to add another support to the front.

I may move some of those to the metal storage shelves that are behind the camera in this shot, too.  I'm gradually organizing the storage, because it's happened more frequently recently that I've found things I forgot I had.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

Moderator
  • Member since
    September 2011
Posted by Tim Kidwell on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 12:58 PM

Sorry! I've been editing stories and shooting video, so my head has been elsewhere.

That is ... like ... holy smoke, Brad. You've got guts to build there. How much white metal you have on those shelves?

Since posting this thread, I've been going through my modeling tools, putting together toolboxes for my son (14) and daughter (7). You remember in a response to Greg about the X-Acto toolboxes, I mentioned a cabinet? Well, I decided to clear it out as part of the process and opened one of the drawers which I must have never opened before and found this:




I don't remember seeing Dad using it, but it is now my new brass rod snips. Don't know how old it is (I suspect older than me because I doubt he picked them up while living in Alaska and long before the internet!), but, man, it feels nice in the hand and cuts cleanly. And Footprint Tools is still in business! Still making tools in Sheffield, England, and been at it since 1760. 

Okay. I have to get back to editing Snapshots, a magazine cover, and reviews. Everyone have a great day and share some photos of the oldest tool you use for modeling! 

--

Timothy Kidwell
Editor
Scale Model Brands
Kalmbach Media

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, January 25, 2023 2:16 PM

Tim Kidwell
Okay. I have to get back to editing Snapshots, a magazine cover, and reviews.

If I had a nickel for every time I've heard that one!

Seriously scary, Brad.

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, January 26, 2023 11:03 AM

A bit of an optical illustion, too.  The sag is exaggerated from that angle.  If I stand where the chair is, it's there, just not as pronounced.

But yeah, in any case, I have it on my punch list to add a support.  As soon as the temperature goes up enough in my garage.  It's winter here, and the garage is unheated.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.