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Glue Question

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  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 19, 2004 6:35 PM
I got a slightly different setup, my spraybooth is right behind the workarea.
So I just switch that thing on and it pulls all the nasties away from me and the model.

Works well.
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, October 19, 2004 4:38 PM
A couple more glue question.
What are the best brands or kinds of glue to use?
Would super glue work good too?
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, October 18, 2004 8:44 AM
QUOTE: Originally posted by qmiester

If I knock over the open bottle, the respirator goes on until I can get the mess cleaned up and the room aired out (been there, done that, got the T-shirt).


i got the T-shirt too ! mine is olive drab, with a dash of dried CA! what color is yours? Big Smile [:D]
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, October 18, 2004 7:29 AM
Your post made sense to me. I think I've got a fan I can use somewhere too.
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: SETX. USA
Posted by tho9900 on Monday, October 18, 2004 6:02 AM
oh yeah... ::thinking of last night:: ...there I was, sprue tree in one hand, airbrush in the other... I noticed the open botle of steel I had been using a scant moment before... well, I don't need to continue now, do I?

Yeah just so you don't get confused Molina... I meant the fan in your work room for general work, or at least good ventilation (I like my fan, we've grown quite attached...) and use the respirator for painting.. I reread my previous post after qmeister posted and it isn't real clear...

---Tom--- O' brave new world, That has such people in it!
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: Central USA
Posted by qmiester on Sunday, October 17, 2004 9:56 PM
Most liquid glues used in modeling are volatile, which means that in addition to being extremely flammable, they tend to evaporate very quickly. Which means that the fumes tend to disappear quickly as well. If your modeling area is well ventilated and you don't have your nose over the open bottle or over the area where you are applying the glue, then a respirator is probably overkill. The rule of thumb I've used for years is that if I use a chemical and the fumes linger - wear a respirator. Please note that I'm talking about the fumes given off by the liquid on the brush, still wet on the model and what escapes from the bottle. If I knock over the open bottle, the respirator goes on until I can get the mess cleaned up and the room aired out (been there, done that, got the T-shirt).
Quincy
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: SETX. USA
Posted by tho9900 on Sunday, October 17, 2004 4:25 PM
just keep a fan blowing nearby and you should be fine... especially if ya have a respirator for the airbrushing...
---Tom--- O' brave new world, That has such people in it!
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 17, 2004 2:03 PM
It must have just been a glue that I read a post about then and got it confused with putty.
  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: USA
Posted by MusicCity on Sunday, October 17, 2004 1:43 PM
There are several glues that weld plastic together, but as the others have mentioned, I'm not aware of any putty that does. Putty is normally for filling seams and other areas, not for joining parts. Tenax 7R and Ambroid Pro Weld are probably the two best welding-type glues, and they do work great.
Scott Craig -- Nashville, TN -- My Website -- My Models Page
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 17, 2004 12:22 PM
I thought I saw a post about some putty that would sort of weld pieces together. Maybe that's what I'm thinking of. Anyway, I do have a respirator so I'm set there. I guess I'll just have to put up with toxic fumes and hope I don't get brain damage, if it hasn't happened already. Wink [;)]
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: SETX. USA
Posted by tho9900 on Sunday, October 17, 2004 11:27 AM
the only putty I know that would do that is epoxy putty, but that would eat the model up...

If you are talking about filler putty, it's used to fill gaps when you put the fuselage together... and yeah the fumes are toxic... again just ventilate... almost everything paint/thinner etc.. we use is toxic in some level or another.. just suck it out or blow fresh air in and you should be ok, except when airbrushing laquers and enamels and stuff, and using laquer thinner etc... then you should have a respirator... about 30 bucks for one at lowes or home depot that filters fumes as well as dust...
---Tom--- O' brave new world, That has such people in it!
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: A Spartan in the Wolverine State
Posted by rjkplasticmod on Sunday, October 17, 2004 10:10 AM
What putty are you refering too? Not aware of any that also acts as an adhesive.

Regards, Rick
RICK At My Age, I've Seen It All, Done It All, But I Don't Remember It All...
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 17, 2004 8:46 AM
What about this putty that is supposed to weld the pieces together? Is that toxic as well and is it easy to use?

Btw, I eat organic so there shouldn't be too much toxicity involved.Cool [8D]
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: phoenix
Posted by grandadjohn on Saturday, October 16, 2004 10:26 PM
Non-toxic glue doesn't work well, best to use the other, but ventilate, I use my fan ot pull fumes away from me. Also have a ceiling fan to move air. Temps in the desert in the summer are 100+ but we complain when humidity goes over 10%. Agree with ol doc up there AC only goes so far and turns off and on.
John
Helicopters don't fly, they beat the air into submission
  • Member since
    November 2005
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, October 16, 2004 10:23 PM
while you worry about the toxicity of the glue, contemplate the last few meals you had and think about the toxicity of *that*.
my point is that everything is toxic, but to varying extents and exposure times and intensities. just get some good ventilation, and you can use the glues that work best and smell the worst with no worries.
  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: SETX. USA
Posted by tho9900 on Saturday, October 16, 2004 9:11 PM
Sign - Ditto [#ditto]

(I really wish they would fix that ditto sign... but anyway, I digress)

I agree... I work with a desk mounted fan (actually mounted to the back of a chair at another desk not far from mine in the hobby room) blowing diagonally across my hobby desk... that is, blowing across me (and my nose) but not over where the model itself is... I think the fan was like 3 dollars at wal mart or somewhere like that... works like a champ! Plus it keeps you from sweating on your model in the summer, down in the bayous of Texas that's good! (summers in the 100's with 100% humidity) Even the AC can't take care of it all! Especially with all the lighting around you!


non toxic glues have a history of being messy, not much adhesion, long drying times which translates to parts being moved, seams not aligning etc... but they do have a lemon fresh smell!
---Tom--- O' brave new world, That has such people in it!
  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: A Spartan in the Wolverine State
Posted by rjkplasticmod on Saturday, October 16, 2004 10:07 AM
There are non-toxic glues available but in my experience they don't work very well. Work in a well ventilated area & the amount of toxicity from the glue is minimal.

Regards, Rick
RICK At My Age, I've Seen It All, Done It All, But I Don't Remember It All...
  • Member since
    November 2005
Glue Question
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, October 16, 2004 9:53 AM
I heard from someone that modeling glue has toxic fumes and stuff like that. If this is true is there a kind of non-toxic glue to be had?
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