SEARCH FINESCALE.COM

Enter keywords or a search phrase below:

Aircraft is plural

2587 views
33 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    January 2013
Aircraft is plural
Posted by seastallion53 on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 7:24 PM

I keep hearing people on various documentary shows refer to more than 1 flying machine as aircrafts.Where did this come from,aircrafts is not a word.Aircraft is plural and singular.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 7:28 PM

That sounds about normal for the "experts" they regularly have on documentaries like that.  I have a really hard time watching those shows all the way through, since they're so full of errors.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 8:58 PM

I haven't heard that word yet, been lucky I guess.

In all the squadrons I have been in or had around me, aircraft was the word used regardless of how many ship were involved, from one to an entire wing.  Almost nobody used the word airplane either although "ship/ships" was common;y used also.  I have no idea where that started.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 9:23 PM

Both are entirely acceptable. It could be a difference between the Queen's English, or " American".

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 9:32 PM

Indeed there are differences in English. My previous CEO was from the UK.  
Microsoft is a big company. 
my CEO

Microsoft are a big company. 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 9:55 PM

ikar01

I haven't heard that word yet, been lucky I guess.

In all the squadrons I have been in or had around me, aircraft was the word used regardless of how many ship were involved, from one to an entire wing.  Almost nobody used the word airplane either although "ship/ships" was common;y used also.  I have no idea where that started.

 

Just a guess, from the airship/ derrigible.era.  They  "floated" in the air. No one could see any wings tonight support their flight.

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by seastallion53 on Wednesday, March 10, 2021 11:56 PM
In my Navy squadron we referred our Seastallions as birds.
  • Member since
    May 2009
  • From: Poland
Posted by Pawel on Thursday, March 11, 2021 5:21 AM

Hello!

But those Seastallions definitely were no "choppers", right?

Have a nice day

PaweĊ‚

All comments and critique welcomed. Thanks for your honest opinions!

www.vietnam.net.pl

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by seastallion53 on Thursday, March 11, 2021 8:02 AM

Exactly,the RH-53D had 6 blades generating 100,000 v static electricity,40 crew and passengers.my welcome package to HM-14 said it is the biggest,baddest,meanist helicopter in the free world.I enjoyed crewing them alot.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, March 11, 2021 8:39 AM

There are people who say 'aircrafts,' just as there are people who will say 'sheeps' and 'fishes.' Beyond a certain point, as long as you know what they mean, what does it matter?

The really sad part is that these days even 'professionals' in the 'communications' industry can't get grammar, syntax or pronunciation right much of the time...and apparently there are no better-informed higher ups to instruct them otherwise...so much of the public has no 'standard' to go by.

[End of 'old guy' rant. Now where's my juice box....? Propeller]

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, March 11, 2021 8:52 AM

An aircraft is any flying machine- airship/blimp/dirigible, balloon, glider, airplane, helicopter and I believe even kite (there were early man-carrying kites flown from warships).  There were national organizations (I think they still exist) about aircraft that kind of agreed on nomenclature.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, March 11, 2021 9:03 AM

Really?

      You should see the words that pop up on my closed captioned T.V. I always thought that to type or program a computer to generate the words in an electronic medium, you had to know how to spell even basic words. Guess I was wrong.

     Because I traveled so much when I was younger( Employment) I use Both, the ( British?) spelling of words and American English. Sometimes an Australian phrase or word will sneak in there as well. I actually cannot read half of what C.C. says on the Telly. So now I am learning to Lip Read!

      No, Folks, I was Not born here. I was a Furriner till I enlisted, then they told me that through my childhood, Because I was adopted at Ellis Island, I wasn't a citizen! Until I got sworn in with the Oath of Citizinship and the Naval Swear in!

 Doesn't matter-I grew up speaking English, Sicilian and Austro -German. Had to forget those last two by Grandpa's order. We're in America Now. One important thing, We learned how to spell correctly!

 My biggest peeve is a certain group of folks of all color, can't seem to get it right. It's ASK, not AKS !

    

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, March 11, 2021 9:27 AM

seastallion53

I keep hearing people on various documentary shows refer to more than 1 flying machine as aircrafts.Where did this come from,aircrafts is not a word.Aircraft is plural and singular.

 
The root word itself, "craft" is singular and plural, when it refers to a conveyance:  seacraft, watercraft, space craft.  When it's used in the meaning of a skill, then it has a normal plural, as in "arts & crafts".
 
The problem is that successive classes of kids have been taught, increasingly, that these things don't matter.  And more increasingly, they're being taught that good grammar is oppression.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2011
  • From: Armpit of NY
Posted by MJames70 on Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:03 AM

Language changes, though. That doesn't make it lazy or sloppy. Language serves us, not we language. Another example, when referring to those little gaming cubes - it used to be one die, two or more dice. Now, dice is considered acceptable regardless of the number...one dice, two dice...

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:07 AM

MJames70

Language changes, though. That doesn't make it lazy or sloppy. Language serves us, not we language. Another example, when referring to those little gaming cubes - it used to be one die, two or more dice. Now, dice is considered acceptable regardless of the number...one dice, two dice...

 

 
True, but nobody intermixing those is a paid "expert" on a documentary about dice.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: From the Mit, but live in Mason, O high ho
Posted by hogfanfs on Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:11 AM

seastallion53

I keep hearing people on various documentary shows refer to more than 1 flying machine as aircrafts.Where did this come from,aircrafts is not a word.Aircraft is plural and singular.

 

 
I will usually watch these shows while drinking a bunch of beers. Big Smile

 Bruce

 

 On the bench:  1/48 Eduard MiG-21MF

                        1/35 Takom Merkava Mk.I

 

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:19 AM

Slightly off-topic, but grammar is something that has all sorts of class distinctions attached to it, which really doesn't make a lot of sense.

For instance, "won't" is perfectly acceptable, "ain't" is equated by many with tractor caps and missing teeth. 

 

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Thursday, March 11, 2021 11:36 AM

   1 hippopotamus

 2 hippopotomi???

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Thursday, March 11, 2021 11:50 AM

armornut

   1 hippopotamus

 2 hippopotomi???

 

What is the plural of moose? Bang Head

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Thursday, March 11, 2021 12:15 PM

Eaglecash867
What is the plural of moose? Bang Head

"There's one moose...and there's another moose."

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    August 2020
  • From: Lakes Entrance, Victoria, Australia.
Posted by Dodgy on Thursday, March 11, 2021 11:08 PM

gregbale

There are people who say 'aircrafts,' just as there are people who will say 'sheeps' and 'fishes.' Beyond a certain point, as long as you know what they mean, what does it matter?

The really sad part is that these days even 'professionals' in the 'communications' industry can't get grammar, syntax or pronunciation right much of the time...and apparently there are no better-informed higher ups to instruct them otherwise...so much of the public has no 'standard' to go by.

[End of 'old guy' rant. Now where's my juice box....? Propeller]

 

Hearing you Greg, from one old guy to another, or 'bloke', as we Antipodeans say......

I long to live in a world where chickens can cross the road without having their motives questioned

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, March 12, 2021 7:13 AM

The language change the bugs me today is the insistance of adding a pronoun after the noun that is the subject of the sentence.

My sister she went to the store.

The low, it is moving off to the northeast.

This bill it will bring many advantages to the workers.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, March 12, 2021 8:08 AM

How about using "is", twice in a row?  I hear that all the time.

"The thing of it is, is..." Bang Head

Or "alls".

"Alls I'm trying to say is..." Bang Head

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Friday, March 12, 2021 8:24 AM

Don Stauffer

The language change the bugs me today is the insistance of adding a pronoun after the noun that is the subject of the sentence.

My sister she went to the store.

The low, it is moving off to the northeast.

This bill it will bring many advantages to the workers.

 

 

And usually said by people with at least a four year degree.

And don't forget the interviews with most of the college educated sports stars of today.

I don't know if many can remember the great Ebonics exercise in Oakland years ago. Was easier to teach "getto" than English.  Seems to have spread somewhat since then.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Friday, March 12, 2021 9:41 AM

The most annoying form of talking today is Up-Talking. They all sound like their statements are questions,Mostly young people up to 40

Also people who "fry" the end of their sentences 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, March 12, 2021 10:32 AM

Eaglecash867

How about using "is", twice in a row?  I hear that all the time.

"The thing of it is, is..." Bang Head

Or "alls".

"Alls I'm trying to say is..." Bang Head

Reminded me of the old Andy Griffith routine:

"What it was, was...."

One least favorite, being heard more widely these days, is 'ex-specially.'

But the one that really pops my cork...heard all-too-often from newscasters and even military and scientific types who should know better...is

...NUKE-yuh-LER. AngryDevilBang Head

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: North East of England
Posted by Hutch6390 on Friday, March 12, 2021 10:42 AM

Dodgy
gregbale There are people who say 'aircrafts,' just as there are people who will say 'sheeps' and 'fishes.' Beyond a certain point, as long as you know what they mean, what does it matter? The really sad part is that these days even 'professionals' in the 'communications' industry can't get grammar, syntax or pronunciation right much of the time...and apparently there are no better-informed higher ups to instruct them otherwise...so much of the public has no 'standard' to go by. [End of 'old guy' rant. Now where's my juice box....? ]  

Hearing you Greg, from one old guy to another, or 'bloke', as we Antipodeans say......

And you can add another bloke to the list...it saddens me.  Every day I read, at work, reports written by people of my own age & background, who occupy responsible positions, and whose "command" of the English language is actually more like a suggestion.  They don't know the difference between "affect" and "effect", or between "sat" and "sitting" e.g. "I was sat at the back of the train" - really?  Who sat you there?  The use of "there", "their", and "they're", or "where" and "were" appears entirely random.  And the use of the word "issue" instead of "problem" e.g. "he has mental health issues" really makes my blood boil.

OK, I'm going to take a tablet and have a lie down, now.  Yes, thank you, nurse...

Vell, Zaphod's just zis guy, you know?

TakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakka

 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, March 12, 2021 10:55 AM

MJames70

Language changes, though. That doesn't make it lazy or sloppy. Language serves us, not we language. Another example, when referring to those little gaming cubes - it used to be one die, two or more dice. Now, dice is considered acceptable regardless of the number...one dice, two dice... 

Language changes, but in the presence of less-than-mediocre instruction, it changes in ways that indicate a certain lack of mental discipline on the part of the speakers.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2007
  • From: Northeast WA State
Posted by armornut on Friday, March 12, 2021 11:51 AM

    I watched a video awhile ago, the topic was how far back in time could an english speaking person go, the video was narrated by a Brit, and still be understood. Interestingly people today would have almost zero understanding of language spoken in the 1300s, minimal understanding in the late 1500s, and only into the late 1700s would you be able to communicate the basics for survival.

we're modelers it's what we do

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, March 12, 2021 5:16 PM

gregbale
Reminded me of the old Andy Griffith routine: "What it was, was...." One least favorite, being heard more widely these days, is 'ex-specially.' But the one that really pops my cork...heard all-too-often from newcasters and even military and scientific types who should know better...is ...NUKE-yuh-LER.

That reminds me...something that really annoys the hell out of me when watching training videos at work is that one member of our training staff has a particular fondness for saying "excedra" every few sentences, instead of saying "et cetera".  My problem with that is that very few people commonly use that in a sentence, so why does someone who doesn't even know what the word actually is, insist on trying to use it so often?  Drives me nuts!  If you don't know a word, its perfectly fine not to use it. 

I had a high school Biology teacher that used to tell us that the center of a cell is called the "NUKE-yuh-LUS".  Bang Head

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

SEARCH FORUMS
FREE NEWSLETTER
By signing up you may also receive reader surveys and occasional special offers. We do not sell, rent or trade our email lists. View our Privacy Policy.