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Help with washpin wash

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  • Member since
    October 2021
Help with washpin wash
Posted by SkylineGTR on Saturday, October 23, 2021 6:22 AM

Hi all,

I am new here and hopefully posted in the correction section.

I am trying to weather my M51 with sort of a pin wash, but always run into this problem.

I gloss coated my tank, and used Tamiya Panel Line to do it. It looks ok when I first touch the brush with the tank and the wash flows to the corner/gaps. But before they actually dry, they starting to flow out from where I want them to be and become a mess like below.

What did I do wrong? Crying

Thanks!!

 

 

  • Member since
    March 2005
  • From: West Virginia, USA
Posted by mfsob on Tuesday, October 26, 2021 7:38 AM

I'm mostly a ship guy, so am NO expert on most things weathering, but - what kind of gloss coat did you use? If it's an enamel gloss coat, Tamiya Panel Line Accent Color doesn't play well with it - you're basically putting enamel on top of enamel. That could account for the "diffusion" of the panel line accent onto the other surfaces where you don't want it to go.

 

My 2 cents.

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Tuesday, October 26, 2021 7:49 AM

Yup...what mfsob said.  Tamiya Panel Line Accent needs to go on over an acrylic glosscoat, and even then its a crapshoot as to whether or not its going to go right through that and attack the paint underneath.  Normally with a pin wash, you're going to be going back over those areas with a Q-Tip that is just barely damp with whatever thinner works at removing the excess to clean it up.  In the case of Tamiya Panel Line Accent, that would be enamel thinner...which also might go right through whatever clearcoat you used and damage the paint underneath.  If it were me, I'd clean up the tiny portion you've already done and then switch over to Flory Wash.  It is water/clay based, so the cleanup of the excess is done with a Q-Tip or little sponge that is just barely damp with plain old, completely safe, water.  It takes all of the stress, guesswork, and extra steps out of the weathering process.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Tuesday, October 26, 2021 9:02 AM

Also, you might take a look at the Techniques forum in the Tools, Techniques, and Reference Materials group of forums.  Washes are frequently discussed in that forum.  There are some real gems of forums in that group.  Particularly good  is the Painting and Airbrushing forum.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    October 2021
Posted by SkylineGTR on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 7:37 AM

I used Future floor polish as the clear coat.

I think it's not eating through the clear coat at the moment so far, but just somehow the panel line wash doesn't seem to stay on the edge where I want them to be. They look perfect when I just apply them and while wet, but before they keep 'creep' out from the corner before they dry up for some reason

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Wednesday, October 27, 2021 8:35 AM

Panel line washes will almoost always creep out from where you want them, that's why you use a Q-Tip dampened with paint thinner to clean up the excess.  Wink

Just dip the Q-Tip in the paint thinner, and then use a paper towel to dab it on until you get most of the thinner out of the Q-Tip.  Then you just make light, quick wipes with the Q-Tip to remove the excess, while leaving the accenter stuck in the recess behind.

I used the Tamiya Black Panel Line Accenter on this one, over a Future clearcoat, with Tamiya AS-20 spray lacquer as my base color.  Cleaned up the excess with a combo of Q-Tips with paint thinner, and an old, ratty toothbrush in the really busy areas.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    October 2021
Posted by SkylineGTR on Thursday, October 28, 2021 7:42 AM
Thanks, I am trying to do clean up with q tip at the moment. The more open areas are ok-ish, but struggling a lot when it's like between running gears of the tank
  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Thursday, October 28, 2021 11:18 AM

I like to use water-based acrylics for my washes, because I can use a cotton swab damped with water to remove the excess, as EagleCash described above.  And the water doesn't attack the Future I use for gloss-coating.

Unfortunately, gloss-coating can reduce the likelihood that your wash will run out via capillary action, but it seems there are always still tiny imperfections in the surface that the wash flows into.  In any case, removing the excess before it dries is a good step to add to the process.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    October 2013
Posted by chops1sc on Friday, October 29, 2021 11:42 AM

I have experienced this exact issue. I have seen it with Future, Model master acrylic clear, you name it. It actually was worse with higher gloss clears. I recently watched a video where the builder actually thins his Tamiya Panel Liner with odorless mineral spirits. I will be trying this next time I use it.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, October 29, 2021 11:51 AM

I don't think the thinning agent will make much of a difference.  If the surface has tiny imperfections in it, there will be some bleed.  I think EagleCash's tip to remove the excess as quickly as possible, before it has a chance to bleed a lot, is probably a better step against that.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, October 29, 2021 12:07 PM

Yup, or just use Flory wash and eliminate all of the guesswork.  I'm using Flory exclusively for panel line washes now.  That stuff you just slop all over the model with a large brush and then clean up the excess with sponges, Q-Tips, or even clean paintbrushes dampened with water.  You can even literally leave it on for months or years and when you finally get around to removing the excess, it will come off easily from the spots you want to remove it from.  Its compatible with any kind of paint or clearcoat since it uses no solvents of any kind.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    October 2013
Posted by chops1sc on Monday, November 1, 2021 12:03 PM

Eaglecash867

Yup, or just use Flory wash and eliminate all of the guesswork.  I'm using Flory exclusively for panel line washes now.  That stuff you just slop all over the model with a large brush and then clean up the excess with sponges, Q-Tips, or even clean paintbrushes dampened with water.  You can even literally leave it on for months or years and when you finally get around to removing the excess, it will come off easily from the spots you want to remove it from.  Its compatible with any kind of paint or clearcoat since it uses no solvents of any kind.

 

I have a different brand but it is a clay wash as well. They definitely come in handy when you use it as you describe. Sometimes though, you need a sniper instead of a nuke, LOL!

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