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How to clean paintbrush, and painting tamiya to wood

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  • Member since
    January 2021
  • From: Somewhere near Chicago
How to clean paintbrush, and painting tamiya to wood
Posted by Teenage Modeler on Friday, October 1, 2021 6:20 PM

Hey all. It's been a while (2 months) since I posted due to school. I have not worked on a model, or been doing scale models. Anyway, this is just a lingering question that I have probably asked a while.

How do I clean the paint after painbrushing? I am specifically talking about Tamiya acrylics. For me, I soak them in 90% alcohol for about a day, but even then, the paint that has been lingering for long time in one of my paintbrushes won't dissolve. The paintbrush that used to be a tannish color (the brush part) looks like a dark color now. To top it off, the paintbrush seems to be thinning. Just like when people's hair thin, it feels like it is thinning. What I mean by that is, new paintbrushes seem to have that waxy, smooth feeling, but now, it feels a bit rough, and feels old. How do I remove the paint? Should I use acetone? That might work, but it might dissolve the hairs on the brush.

 

Another question is, can I paint a block of wood with Tamiya Acrylic? I am trying to build a toy car (not mine) that requires the color red. I do not hae red craft paint, but I do have Tamiya Red (gloss and flat). Will that work fine? I dont want to spend money on red craft paint when I have red paint.

No signature needed, just my head!

 

 

fox
  • Member since
    January 2007
  • From: Narvon, Pa.
Posted by fox on Friday, October 1, 2021 7:11 PM

I'm not an expert but I'll give your questions a try. You'll probably get more answers here and you can also go to the "painting" section and ask the same question. 

I use craft acrylics and Vallejo acrylics and clean the brushes, and my airbrush, with Windex window cleaner straight out of the bottle. No muss,no fuss, it's cheap and no smell. To get the "old" paint out of the brush, I use lacquer thinner. Make sure you have good venting when using lacquer thinner. It tends to stink up the house and really isn't too good for your lungs. I only use it in my spraybooth and it's vented out the window with an exhaust fan. It's best, if you're not sure what to use, to use the same brand of thinner/cleaner as the paint you are using.

I've painted parts for my wooden ship models with different types of acrylic paints and haven't had any problem with any brand working on wood. My porch roof is held up with aluminum posts that are hollow. Bees were getting into them from the top which didn't match up perfectly and had a slight opening. I cut a block of wood to fit the opening, calked around it and painted it white with Vallejo acrylic paint. It was only a 1" x 1" x 3" piece. It's still white and shows no wear.

Hope that this info helps.

Jim Captain

Stay Safe.

 Main WIP: 

   On the Bench:  Revell 1/96 USS Kearsarge - 70% 

I keep hitting "escape", but I'm still here.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, October 1, 2021 7:55 PM

I use the Walmart equivalent of Windex (actually works better than Windex does for cleaning glass) for cleaning Tamiya paint out of paintbrushes.  Gets it right out immediately.

For any old, cured paint, MEK works really well, as does Acetone.  You have to be really careful about not getting it on your paintbrush handles though, because either one will quickly start eating the handles.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Friday, October 1, 2021 7:58 PM

As usual, Jim's got it down solid.Yes

I use Tamiya acrylics almost exclusively, and Windex is my day-to-day go-to for brush cleaning. Every once in a while (or when I happen to have the jar open) I'll use lacquer thinner for that little extra deep-down clean...particularly for colors like white, red or yellow.

As to painting wood...or pretty much any clean and oil-free surface...Tamiya's acrylics will cover as well as anything. Durability may vary, depending on various factors, but you can always prime if you're uncertain.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    January 2021
  • From: Somewhere near Chicago
Posted by Teenage Modeler on Friday, October 1, 2021 8:13 PM

Eaglecash867

I use the Walmart equivalent of Windex (actually works better than Windex does for cleaning glass) for cleaning Tamiya paint out of paintbrushes.  Gets it right out immediately.

For any old, cured paint, MEK works really well, as does Acetone.  You have to be really careful about not getting it on your paintbrush handles though, because either one will quickly start eating the handles.

 

Will the acetone make the brush hairs "thinner" though? 

No signature needed, just my head!

 

 

  • Member since
    October 2004
  • From: Orlando, Florida
Posted by ikar01 on Friday, October 1, 2021 9:29 PM

I'm not sure how bad the fumes are with acetone but they can't be good.  MEK is probably worse, forced ventilation is needed.  Sometimes my wife would come back after working on her aircraft with MEK and she was deffinately spaced.  In the morning she didn't remember anything about leaving work or anything else.  The only thing she realized was that she woke up the next morning.  Nasty stuff.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 6:15 AM

ikar01

I'm not sure how bad the fumes are with acetone but they can't be good.  MEK is probably worse, forced ventilation is needed.  Sometimes my wife would come back after working on her aircraft with MEK and she was deffinately spaced.  In the morning she didn't remember anything about leaving work or anything else.  The only thing she realized was that she woke up the next morning.  Nasty stuff.

 

Neither of them are that bad for modelling purposes if handled right.  I don't use the acetone all that often, so it just stays in its can.  The MEK, however, I use that a lot.  That I keep in relish jars which are only uncapped for a few seconds.  That being said, any time I work with it on 1:1 aircraft, its for a short time and we have a huge hangar with fans circulating air all the time.  Anything that has to be soaked for a little while (which modelling paintbrushes won't have to be), such as alternate static valves with 40 year old vacuum grease congealed on them, goes into a tuna can and is usually left in an isolated spot while soaking.  Its a lot harder in those situations to limit the amount of time its evaporating into the air, so you definitely need lots of ventilation.  Skin protection is easy, with Latex gloves being impervious to it.

Teenage Modeler, Acetone probably can also damage your bristles if they're synthetic.  I haven't found any that are damaged by it, but I guess its a possibility.  The main thing is to clean your brushes immediately with the Windex so you never have to use the other stuff.  Wink  It'll get all the old paint off though, and then you can start fresh and use the far less toxic Windex exclusively.  Keep in mind that it only takes a few seconds...just dip, swish, wipe on a paper towel (bristles only, don't get any on the handle)...and repeat until you no longer leave color streaks on the paper towel.  Don't leave the container open to the air for longer than a few seconds, and DO NOT store it in a plastic container.  Just use the relish jars.  I don't worry too much about wasting relish by dumping the jar when I buy it.  Afterall, they're only cucumbers, vinegar, and salt water...not a precious resource.  I also have my Windex in relish jars.  They're a very convenient size, cheap, and completely solvent-proof.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Saturday, October 2, 2021 6:38 AM

Eaglecash867
I don't worry too much about wasting relish by dumping the jar when I buy it. Afterall, they're only cucumbers, vinegar, and salt water...not a precious resource.

Having lived through the "Great Relish Blight" and consequent embargo of the late 1980s, I take issue with your reckless and irresponsible statement. Fine relish is one of our most precious national resources. Wink

Now please pass the mustard....

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 6:52 AM

gregbale

Having lived through the "Great Relish Blight" and consequent embargo of the late 1980s, I take issue with your reckless and irresponsible statement. Fine relish is one of our most precious national resources. Wink

Now please pass the mustard....

Pardon me...would you have any Grey Poupon? 

I was there for the Relish Riots of 88.  Dogs and cats...living together...mass hysteria! Clown

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Saturday, October 2, 2021 7:44 AM

gregbale

 

 
Eaglecash867
I don't worry too much about wasting relish by dumping the jar when I buy it. Afterall, they're only cucumbers, vinegar, and salt water...not a precious resource.

 

Having lived through the "Great Relish Blight" and consequent embargo of the late 1980s, I take issue with your reckless and irresponsible statement. Fine relish is one of our most precious national resources. Wink

Now please pass the mustard....

 

A laugh first thing of the day, always appreciated. Smile

-Greg

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Saturday, October 2, 2021 8:35 AM

Eaglecash867

Dogs and cats...living together...mass hysteria! Clown

Anyone who quotes from the world's great philosophers is okay in my book! (I love this plan! I'm excited to be a part of it.) Big Smile

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 9:13 AM

Here is what I do.  I have two baby jars on my workbench, with holes in the top just large enough to fit my biggest brush into them.  One is partially filled with alcohol for acrylic paints, the other with paint thinner for enamel.  I dip a brush into the appropriate jar and swish for a few seconds.  I then clean it off with a paper towel.  It will probably show paint residue.  I then repeat, and after four or five times it will be pretty clear.  I put it in the brush rack.  Periodically I replace the thinners when they turn too dark.  The wiping out with a towel is a big help, over just leaving brush in thinner.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 9:26 AM

gregbale

Anyone who quotes from the world's great philosophers is okay in my book! (I love this plan! I'm excited to be a part of it.) Big Smile

 
Hehehe.  I've gotten cats and large lizards to peacefully coexist and even enjoy each others' company, so...sky's the limit.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    August 2005
  • From: Mansfield, TX
Posted by EdGrune on Saturday, October 2, 2021 10:13 AM

Teenage Modeler

How do I clean the paint after painbrushing? I am specifically talking about Tamiya acrylics. For me, I soak them in 90% alcohol for about a day, but even then, the paint that has been lingering for long time in one of my paintbrushes won't dissolve. The paintbrush that used to be a tannish color (the brush part) looks like a dark color now. To top it off, the paintbrush seems to be thinning. Just like when people's hair thin, it feels like it is thinning. What I mean by that is, new paintbrushes seem to have that waxy, smooth feeling, but now, it feels a bit rough, and feels old. How do I remove the paint? Should I use acetone? That might work, but it might dissolve the hairs on the brush.

Clean your brushes as soon as you finish with a color.   Wait and you will likely ruin the brush.   Isopropyl alcohol  is good for tamiya, as is lacquer thinner.

Do not stand your brushes on the bristles in solvent, even for a day.   That will impart a bend in the bristles

If your bristles are turning dark, that is an indication that you may have paint up in the ferrule (the metal band).    You have overloaded your brush.   You only need to load your brush 1/4 to 1/2 the length of the bristles.    More is not better.  They may be salvaged by massaging dish soap into the brush to try to break the paint, then rinse well.  They also make commercial brush soaps.  Check the craft store.

Brushes that are not cared for have a shorter life span and will wear out quicker.   If you have natural hair/fiber brushes they will not be affected by solvents such as acetone or lacquer thinner.   I have never had a synthetic brush melt with such solvents.    Yes, I have dissolved the glue and paint at the ferrule with too much/too deep lacquer thinner.

Teenage Modeler

Another question is, can I paint a block of wood with Tamiya Acrylic? I am trying to build a toy car (not mine) that requires the color red. I do not hae red craft paint, but I do have Tamiya Red (gloss and flat). Will that work fine? I dont want to spend money on red craft paint when I have red paint.

 

 
If it matters to you or the owner of the wooden car, unless you put in the effort to sand & seal the piece, the wood grain will show through.    Raw wood will also suck in the water-based paint, requiring more paint to cover and a splotchy finish.  Sand the wood until smooth, using progressively finer grits.   Seal the wood, spray Krylon is good.   Fine sand again, then paint the red.
 
If it doesn't matter, just go ahead and paint
  • Member since
    September 2021
Posted by DooeyPyle67 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 10:28 AM

Teenage Modeler

How do I clean the paint after painbrushing? I am specifically talking about Tamiya acrylics. For me, I soak them in 90% alcohol for about a day, but even then, the paint that has been lingering for long time in one of my paintbrushes won't dissolve.

Don't let it sit and linger. Just rinse off and wipe. I use Tamiya brand thinner and sometimes lacquer thinner. 

 

The paintbrush that used to be a tannish color (the brush part) looks like a dark color now.

They do get darker over time but I wouldn't concern yourself over it. 

 

To top it off, the paintbrush seems to be thinning. Just like when people's hair thin, it feels like it is thinning. What I mean by that is, new paintbrushes seem to have that waxy, smooth feeling, but now, it feels a bit rough, and feels old. How do I remove the paint? Should I use acetone? That might work, but it might dissolve the hairs on the brush.

 

Depends on the brush brand you're using. Most of my brushes are Red Sable. None of my brushes have that waxy feeling. Your brushes can't stay new forever. Simply clean your brushes after each use and don't bother letting them sit and linger. I see nothing wrong with cleaning with lacquer thinner. I use it all the time for a quick clean. They do work wonders removing paint. Like a couple folks mentioned, lacquer is pretty hot and has a strong odor. Venting is highly recommended.

 

Another question is, can I paint a block of wood with Tamiya Acrylic? I am trying to build a toy car (not mine) that requires the color red. I do not hae red craft paint, but I do have Tamiya Red (gloss and flat). Will that work fine? I dont want to spend money on red craft paint when I have red paint.

 

I never use Tamiya paint on wood but I don't see the harm in it. But do rememebr this - wood do tend to soak up paint because they are porous. That's why craft paint is a cheaper alternative better choice. Look in Hobby Lobby. How expensive can they be? A couple bucks at most?

 

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: NEVER USE PHOTO BUCKET - IT'S A THREAD WRECKER.
Posted by disastermaster on Saturday, October 2, 2021 4:30 PM

DooeyPyle67

 I never use Tamiya paint on wood but I don't see the harm in it. But do rememebr this - wood do tend to soak up paint because they are porous. That's why craft paint is a cheaper alternative better choice. Look in Hobby Lobby. How expensive can they be? A couple bucks at most?

 

 
Give it a layer of future, let it dry and then you can paint it.
That should fix it.

 

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • From: North East of England
Posted by Hutch6390 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 5:59 PM

That's a very good tip - stored for future (no pun intended - honest!) reference.

Vell, Zaphod's just zis guy, you know?

TakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakkaTakka

 

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