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Just Purchased the Revell Visible V-8 Engine Kit

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  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Just Purchased the Revell Visible V-8 Engine Kit
Posted by Ed Geary on Thursday, July 8, 2021 8:57 AM

Do you really need epoxy cement to secure the metal nuts or will the Tamiya Cement be ok?

 

What would you recommend?

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Thursday, July 8, 2021 10:12 AM

Hi Ed;

     I would use the U.V. glue .It does Not fog the surrounding areas. Whatever you do though. Be very careful concerning irregularities around the sprue attachment points and make sure the surfaces are very cleanly finished. Any irregularity, especially in the Moving part close areas will do you in.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, July 8, 2021 10:17 AM

Definitely do not use Superglue.

Any styrene cement won't work either.

Expoxy sounds like the right choice to me.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Thursday, July 8, 2021 12:00 PM

how about JB Weld Light curing super glue?

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Thursday, July 8, 2021 12:05 PM

I'll also vote for epoxy.  Devcon 2-Ton Epoxy is great stuff with a decent working time to allow you to make sure everything is in alignment before it cures.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Thursday, July 8, 2021 12:09 PM

is there a recommended epoxy that isn't two part?

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Thursday, July 8, 2021 12:15 PM

No such thing that I'm aware of, except for maybe the Bondic UV-cured glue.  No working time on that though once you hit it with the UV light, so its going to depend on the situation.

The Devcon epoxy I have comes in two bottles, so its very easy to dispense precise amounts with it, and no chance of cross-contamination between the tips like what can happen with the syringe-type dispensers.  I just get a pack of sticky notes as mixing pallettes.  Once you're done using the mixed epoxy, you just peel off that sticky note and throw it away...keeps it from accidentally getting tracked everywhere on your bench.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Thursday, July 8, 2021 1:36 PM

Hmmmm....I'm thinking the Bondic may be the answer

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, July 8, 2021 2:01 PM

Eaglecash867
...keeps it from accidentally getting tracked everywhere on your bench.

or stuck to your elbow...

Any superglue containing cyanoacrylate, AFAIK, has the unfortunate effect of clouding permanently any nearby clear parts. No doubt there are ways around that and I could name one or two, but 2 part epoxy is very straightforward to use, as Eagle described it.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Thursday, July 8, 2021 5:10 PM

after mixing the 2 part epoxy, how long does it take to harden?

 

I'm afraid I may only be able to set two nuts before I have to mix more. This engine has 34 of them.

 

 

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Thursday, July 8, 2021 5:23 PM

The Devcon gives you a good 20 minutes of working time.  Full cure in 24 hours.  Even if you had to mix more, its not a big deal to do so.  Its really easy to use.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Thursday, July 8, 2021 5:37 PM

Thank you Eaglecash.  What is the cost on Devcon and where did you purchase it?  What I've seen it seems rather expensive

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Thursday, July 8, 2021 6:05 PM

I bought mine at Amazon.  Its $17.05 there for the two bottles.  They're big bottles, so they'll last a life-time.  I've been using mine for years and still have more than 2/3 of it left.  

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    August 2019
  • From: Central Oregon
Posted by HooYah Deep Sea on Thursday, July 8, 2021 6:36 PM

There is also the epoxy kits that look like two side-by-side hypodermics (Though I recommend cutting out the connecter between the two plungers). And, they come in several different cure times, depending on the intended use.

"Why do I do this? Because the money's good, the scenery changes and they let me use explosives, okay?"

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Friday, July 9, 2021 6:33 AM

Eaglecash, ordered it.  What did you use to apply the epoxy to the model parts?

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, July 9, 2021 7:47 AM

Just usually use a toothpick...the same one I use to mix it with.  Just be careful not to get any of it in the threads of the nuts.  If you apply a tiny bit of epoxy to the outside perimeter of the nuts (maybe thread a screw into the nut part-way and use that as a holder), when you push them into the recesses, the excess epoxy will be pushed up and out of the recess, instead of it being pushed down and underneath the nut (and up into the threads) like it would if you apply the epoxy in the recesses.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Friday, July 9, 2021 8:29 AM

great suggestions, thanks.

 

One more question... how do you determine you are pouring out equal parts from both bottles.

 

I'm sure this thread will be a great help to someone else in the future

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Friday, July 9, 2021 8:42 AM

An old sign maker taught me that dried up epoxy can be removed with true turpentine spirit.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, July 9, 2021 8:59 AM

Ed Geary

great suggestions, thanks.

 

One more question... how do you determine you are pouring out equal parts from both bottles.

 

I'm sure this thread will be a great help to someone else in the future

 

I just eyeball it.  Squirt out a little blob from one bottle onto your mixing pallette, and then put an equal-sized blob from the other bottle right next to it.  When you mix the two blobs together, you'll probably see a little bit of a swirling pattern as you mix.  When you no longer see that swirling pattern, your epoxy should be thoroughly mixed.  Just make sure to squirt stuff from the bottles one at a time and cap one bottle before you uncap and use the other.  That will keep you from accidentally mixing up your two caps.  If you mix up the two caps it will set off a reaction that will slowly kill both bottles...the Amazon review section on this epoxy is loaded with the "This is junk!  It just hardened all by itself in the bottle!" tales of operator error.  Just be careful not to cross-contaminate your bottles and you won't end up like those people.  Cool

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, July 9, 2021 9:01 AM

GMorrison

An old sign maker taught me that dried up epoxy can be removed with true turpentine spirit.

 

Bill

 

Cool advice, Bill!  I had always used Xylene for removing epoxy and polyester resins, but that's obviously a no-go on plastic, because it eats that too.  Turpentine would be a lot more friendly.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Friday, July 9, 2021 9:02 AM

Thank you sir, you have been a great help

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Friday, July 9, 2021 9:09 AM

Yes

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Sunday, July 11, 2021 9:46 AM

the instructions state to lubricate the moving plastic parts with vegetable oil.

Is this the best way to go or does anyone have a recommendation for a better lubricant?

 

I will only be operating this model with the handcrank and won't be running it with a drill trying to get 3500 RPM's

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Sunday, July 11, 2021 9:53 AM

Sounds like vegetable oil is a good way to go to me.  Other oils that you would think of as more of a machine type lubricant might hurt the plastic, especially the clear, polycarbonate plastic parts.  Mineral oil (from the stomach medications part of the grocery store) might also be a good choice because its completely clear and won't darken over time like vegetable oil might.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    January 2020
Posted by Space Ranger on Sunday, July 11, 2021 10:45 AM

Ed Geary

the instructions state to lubricate the moving plastic parts with vegetable oil.

Is this the best way to go or does anyone have a recommendation for a better lubricant?

 

I will only be operating this model with the handcrank and won't be running it with a drill trying to get 3500 RPM's

 

Labelle makes a plastic-safe lubricating oil. It's used by many model railroaders.

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Sunday, July 11, 2021 9:48 PM

For my visible quarter scale 426 Hemi, to avoid any "fogging", I used Testors glue for "Clear" plastic anywhere a piece of clear plastic needed gluing. I also used clamps and/or rubber bands to hold parts together until they dried. 

I would definitely stay away from vegetable oil as a lubricant! I kept things DRY by using graphite for the main bearings and con rods.

This was built probably ten years ago and it still running like new.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Sunday, July 11, 2021 9:53 PM

Actually, I have never heard of this model working other than Jim just now. So it might not be worth it to gum it up with lube.

 

Bill

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    December 2020
  • From: Clermont, Fl
Posted by Ed Geary on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 7:04 AM

interesting model.  I really enjoyed building this. I ended up using the mineral oil as the lube. Really cool how this thing works just as it is supposed to.

 

The instructions sucked - no mention of how the fuel pump was to be installed

  • Member since
    July 2021
Posted by Kingslug on Wednesday, July 21, 2021 1:07 PM
Just don't ever buy the Honda 750 1/3 scale motor..That is impossible to make work..but kind of looks cool. I'm thinking of getting the BMW R90 or the Porche working motor..Pricy but look well made.
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