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Detailing engines

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  • Member since
    October 2011
  • From: Thornton, Co
Detailing engines
Posted by HEAVYGUNS155 on Monday, July 19, 2021 8:58 AM

I am changing over to autos from armor and I want to detail the engine I need a little insight on where to start any help will be appreciated

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Roanoke, Virginia
Posted by BigJim on Monday, July 19, 2021 9:25 AM

May I suggest that you "google" the particular engine you want to build. There are usually lots of photos to show you how to they are detailed. Also, google the type of car that the engine would be in. There again, are usually photos of engine compartments to help you on your trek. Good luck!

  • Member since
    July 2021
Posted by Kingslug on Monday, July 19, 2021 9:35 AM

Lots of pictures of the real thing. Then print yp some pictures from parts websites on the real motor..parts diagrams are great to see what it all looks like and goes together. 

Then its just lots of tubing and hoses and ways to make brackets. There some good utube vids on it. 

Ted Modeling is a good place to get all this. 

  • Member since
    October 2013
Posted by chops1sc on Monday, July 19, 2021 10:35 AM

There are a few good YouTube videos that go into engine wiring and weathering. I have attempted to add detail to a couple builds. It definitely takes patience.

 

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Monday, July 19, 2021 10:48 AM

There are quite a few sources.

        Up to and including Auto Engine Repair manuals. Good Luck!

  • Member since
    April 2006
  • From: Denver, Colorado
Posted by waynec on Monday, July 19, 2021 12:29 PM

some good suggestions. as i have 4 T-34s with complete interior plus a T-34 engine and a T-72 engine as "cargo" i need some detailing information too. plus some of the military trucks have complete engines so thi is not just for autos.

Никто не Забыт    (No one is Forgotten)
Ничто не Забыто  (Nothing is Forgotten)

 

  • Member since
    March 2015
  • From: Close to Chicago
Posted by JohnnyK on Monday, July 19, 2021 12:56 PM

chops1sc

There are a few good YouTube videos that go into engine wiring and weathering. I have attempted to add detail to a couple builds. It definitely takes patience.

 

 

That's a great looking engine. The wash on the transmission brings out the molded details and the rusted headers look outstanding. Nice "grunge" stains on the engine.

Your comments and questions are always welcome.

  • Member since
    April 2020
Posted by Eaglecash867 on Monday, July 19, 2021 1:18 PM

A good alternative to Google for getting photo references is to use Bing.  Bing still allows you to see the photos full-size without having to jump through a bunch of hoops.  It works the way Google used to work before they broke it.

"You can have my illegal fireworks when you pry them from my cold, dead fingers...which are...over there somewhere."

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Monday, July 19, 2021 8:36 PM

Lot of A/M PE for linkages and accessories, resin replacements.  Plug wire kits, or you can use solid wire to make them.  Bigger wire or fine solder for battery cables and hoses.

  • Member since
    November 2018
Posted by oldermodelguy on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 3:45 AM

Short of wires and linkages and such your biggest detail gain will be various washes. Even the cleanest 1/1 engines have a bit of accumulation forming and if nothing else shadows in the deeper crevices. Washes really separates that look of something out of place even though built perfectly and makes the transition to realistic. Even just a subtle wash helps, it doesn't need to be over done.

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 7:13 AM

Drilling out and adding wiring and fuel lines is a fairly easy add-on that packs a lot of visual wallop. Pre-wired distributors are a fairly common aftermarket item...but scavenging some fine wire from old electrical cords or earbuds can give a good start without much financial outlay.

Plumbing and electrical diagrams for most engines are usually plentiful online, and will give a good feel for what runs where. (You can even match firing order to cylinders if you really want to 'go deep' with the accuracy.)

One tip: if confronted with the choice of a little larger or a little smaller wire size to simulate a line, always go smaller. It will end up selling the scale effect much more easily.

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 10:34 AM

Hi;

       As often non repyable Gregbale says, There are a lot of things you can do. Now to make linkages for Carbs, Accelerators etc. I take medium hard Copper wire. Strip the insulation off. Then Put a very nice piece of steel I got from a friend and put the steel on top of the wire which is lying on a Corian Work surface. Hit it evenly with a Hammer( Either soft or hard tip will do) Viola" you have nice workable strips to use for the flat part of the linkages. Springs? Take the wire from earbuds!

 Twist it around a needle or long straightpin. Pull off, stretch a little and there's your spring! Pins to assemble it" Small short pieces of brass hard wire will work. Snip off after Drilling a hole and then  joining the  parts and the remaining piece ( with a drop of C.A. )will hold the parts together

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by Nickg on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 12:02 PM

I love how you did the rust and oily residue look. Great job. 

  • Member since
    November 2005
  • From: Formerly Bryan, now Arlington, Texas
Posted by CapnMac82 on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 5:45 PM

In case you want to mode some really grungy real-life engines, going to YouTue and finding "Will It Start" videos can be very helpful.

But, where they can really shine is in showing off what new replacement parts look ike on old tired iron.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 6:08 PM

Start with a wired distributor - google will point you to a few.  This one comes with the ignition coil wire as well:

Different mettalics and washes add a lot as well. 

And when ready to do more google Detail Master - PE heaven for 1/24 1/25 stuff.  Hobby Design and Top Studio amazing detail sets for larger scale cars and bikes.

Lot's of good stuff here: https://www.tedsmodelingmarketplace.com/engine-related/

 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • From: USA
Posted by keavdog on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 6:31 PM

Also - detail painting can really add a lot.  Tamiya kits that have motors are usually a joy to detail.  This is the Tamiya Toyota GT One

Or this recent Revell release of the Bronco comes with nice engine detail and decals - box stock factory fresh :)

 

 

Thanks,

John

  • Member since
    January 2020
  • From: Maryland
Posted by wpwar11 on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 7:42 PM

I'm currently buidling that Gt One Toyota kit from Tamiya.  Keavdog is right.  Out of the box it's really fun and the engine is super cool.

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 8:03 PM

keavdog

Also - detail painting can really add a lot.  Tamiya kits that have motors are usually a joy to detail.  This is the Tamiya Toyota GT One

Or this recent Revell release of the Bronco comes with nice engine detail and decals - box stock factory fresh :)

 

 

 

Hopefully the new half cab bronc with trailer and sand buggy is as good in both firerooms

  • Member since
    June 2021
Posted by rocketman2000 on Thursday, July 22, 2021 8:32 AM

After you get more experienced with cars, you can look into resin aftermarket engines.  If the kit engine is not detailed enough, or you wish to do an engine swap, there are lots of nice resin engines available.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2021
Posted by Kingslug on Thursday, July 22, 2021 9:47 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_2y_IXUYdk&t=1329s

 

This has a lot of info..I bought everything he said to and its working well. 

  • Member since
    March 2012
  • From: Corpus Christi, Tx
Posted by mustang1989 on Sunday, July 25, 2021 8:03 AM

rocketman2000

After you get more experienced with cars, you can look into resin aftermarket engines.  If the kit engine is not detailed enough, or you wish to do an engine swap, there are lots of nice resin engines available.

 

 

He's right. And from what I'm seeing if you get a guy or gal that's really good with a 3-D printer they can even do better than resin but resin is a great place to start. Been using the stuff for years and it really makes a big difference.

                   

 

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