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"wiring" or "rigging" Biplanes

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  • Member since
    April 2015
  • From: Detroit, MURDER CITY
"wiring" or "rigging" Biplanes
Posted by RudyOnWheels on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 11:51 AM
Hello all, I am getting ready to take on my first Biplane build, I think its called a Fokker DR 1. I am wondering what kind of material you guys use to "rig" or "wire" (not sure what it is actually called) the plane, between the wings/struts. I would also like to use this material for other aircraft. I did see one person say they use some sort of wire for railroading, in a recent issue of FSM. What do you use, and where do you get it? Thank You, Rudy
  • Member since
    July 2008
  • From: Albany, NY
Posted by jeffpez on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 12:40 PM

More than likely you're referring to EZ Line. It's great stuff and can be used for any kind of rigging. You buy it directly from them at www.berkshirejunction.com/ezline.html and they even send you an invoice to mail back a check with after you've received your order.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 1:26 PM

It really depends on the scale. For a first effort at any scale, jeff is right, EZLine makes it painless. As you get experience and build in larger scales, there's all kinds of other stuff.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    April 2015
  • From: Detroit, MURDER CITY
Posted by RudyOnWheels on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 2:00 PM

OOPS, sorry guys. I prefer 1:48, and am just getting into 1:35 Armor as well.

Thanks!

  • Member since
    April 2015
  • From: Detroit, MURDER CITY
Posted by RudyOnWheels on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 2:02 PM

That looks like the stuff! I see their scale recommendations, I did not check prices, would it be wise to have both sizes I'd guess? For different uses?

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 2:04 PM

Yes it would. It;'s cheap.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    January 2013
Posted by BlackSheepTwoOneFour on Wednesday, April 22, 2015 2:11 PM

I'd get extra fine in either white, black or French blue. $10.98 for a 100 foot spool isn't bad actually.

  • Member since
    June 2012
Posted by Compressorman on Thursday, April 23, 2015 2:09 PM

Some people use super light fishing line, 2 lb or so. You can take a silver sharpie and color it. I wouldn't use a black anything. If you look online at biplanes you will see that most cables are a silver-grayish color.

Chris

  • Member since
    August 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Friday, April 24, 2015 8:37 AM

Since I am a fisherman, I have plenty of line laying around so that's what I use ,and am happy with it.  you don't hafta install it super tight as a hot match stick with no flame tightens the line very well.  Just run the blown out match close to the line without touching it and it magically tightens itself.  I use CA to glue it to the plane and it is a very quick process.   I usually color the line with acrylic gray or flat steel after installing it.

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    July 2015
Posted by CajunAce on Sunday, October 25, 2015 6:57 AM

By the way if you are planning to rig the Dr.1 you should know the only rigging it had other than ailerons...elevator...and rudder........ Was the inner Cabane struts above the guns and below the fuselage to the Landing gear... both rigged in a "X" pattern.   In case you didnt know already that is

I'm a WW1 Kind of Guy

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 9:18 AM

I do something that a lot of folks really do not like to do, but it works for me.  I drill holes through both wings.  I start at one wing- say lower, feed the thread through, then CA at one wing, say lower.  Then I feed thread through and weight it with a closepin, holding model so gravity keeps line taut while I CA the line at the other end.  Using a really sharp knife (I use scalpel with fresh blade) cut the line flush at each end.  Then I daub just the tiniest spot of paint on the outer surfaces where line came through, using toothpick.

For fuselage terminations, I start line at fuselage end, just gluing end of line into hole, and do the weight trick at other end.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Central Ohio
Posted by Ashley on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 10:26 AM

Don, are you ready for a can of worms? I have for years been trying to find a good way to make realistic streamline wires. They have a short section of round wire just before they enter the clevis or turnbuckle, and of course, they're rolled flat for most of their length. So, this means each one is a unique length combination of flat and round section. I have a Williams 1/32 GeeBee which will NEVER get finished unless I solve this one. Any ideas?

Have you flown a Ford lately?

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, October 31, 2015 9:29 AM

Some kits come with stainless PE of that type of forged flying wire.  Would be nice if we could convince some PE shop to do generic sets of various lengths.  Since these have to be exact length, you could have the one end necked down and cut the other end to length.  The cut end could go in the least visible area.

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • From: Central Ohio
Posted by Ashley on Saturday, October 31, 2015 2:39 PM

The PE stuff is nice, no doubt. I tried rolling solder, and I got a nice streamline shape with a round section on each end. Problem was that the solder was so maleable it would sag and bend once installed. I'm thinking of trying annealed aluminum wire next, but I'll have to build a pretty substantial miniature slip roll. Stay tuned for progress on that one!

Have you flown a Ford lately?

  • Member since
    April 2005
  • From: Piscataway, NJ!
Posted by wing_nut on Monday, November 2, 2015 11:10 AM
Ashley, The size wire you are talking about will melt with the heat of an ordinary match.  the use of an aluminum tube will likely worked better than a rod as far s getting the flattened bit.  The problem with either is the curl you are going to get either way.  It's going to take some work to get it flat enough to look like it's taught on the model.  I use some "flat" EZ-line I got from Wingnut Wings and a couple of commission Brits bipes and it looks great.  In fact it's not actually flat in cross section but it sure looks like it when it's done.
 

Marc  

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, November 4, 2015 11:25 AM

Ashley

Don, are you ready for a can of worms? I have for years been trying to find a good way to make realistic streamline wires. They have a short section of round wire just before they enter the clevis or turnbuckle, and of course, they're rolled flat for most of their length. So, this means each one is a unique length combination of flat and round section. I have a Williams 1/32 GeeBee which will NEVER get finished unless I solve this one. Any ideas?

In 1/32, you might also want to try the finer gauges of styrene strip.  The RAF wires you're talking about are flat, not round, when viewed from a distance (or from the scale distance to the eye of someone looking at your model).  They have an airfoil shape.

That idea came to me when I first saw Accurate Miniatures' F3F kit and the PE rigging supplied with the kit.  I realized that the PE replicates the actual wire pretty well, and that's since been reinforced when I've seen biplanes like the Stearman, up close.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

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