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Rust

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  • Member since
    January 2012
Rust
Posted by PANZER826 on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 12:54 PM

     Anybody here ever make either rust powder or a rust wash using steel wool soaked in vinegar? If so how were the results?

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Tuesday, March 26, 2019 5:34 PM
Can’t say that I have.I have a couple of bottles of AK stuff,two different shades and a jar of MiG pigments,they go a long way,and I have been happy with results.

  • Member since
    August 2012
  • From: Parker City, IN.
Posted by Rambo on Wednesday, March 27, 2019 2:51 AM
Tried it, took a long time for it to turn. Also tried it using dust from a shotblast at work, the shot is iron, it rusted up a lot faster. Still wasn't happy with it. Best thing I've found so far is Vallejo's environment Rust effects.

Clint

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Friday, March 29, 2019 8:36 AM

I have a jar of rust color MMP Powder that is very good but I guess that any rust color pigment will work as well. I combine the pigment with paints and oil washes.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Friday, March 29, 2019 9:32 AM

There used to be a product called Jeweler's Rouge, which was iron oxide (rust) ground very thin.  It could used as a powder to simulate rust, or as a pigment to make a rust colored paint.  It was used for fine polish on brass and things.  Haven't seen it in hardware stores for ages, but a Google search could probably find it.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2013
  • From: Chicago area
Posted by modelmaker66 on Friday, March 29, 2019 2:58 PM

Don Stauffer

There used to be a product called Jeweler's Rouge, which was iron oxide (rust) ground very thin.  It could used as a powder to simulate rust, or as a pigment to make a rust colored paint.  It was used for fine polish on brass and things.  Haven't seen it in hardware stores for ages, but a Google search could probably find it.

 

 

That's a great idea! Thanks for the post. You really have a vast knowledge and experience, I'm always picking up stuff from your posts!

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Saturday, March 30, 2019 6:44 AM

modelmaker66

 

 
Don Stauffer

There used to be a product called Jeweler's Rouge, which was iron oxide (rust) ground very thin.  It could used as a powder to simulate rust, or as a pigment to make a rust colored paint.  It was used for fine polish on brass and things.  Haven't seen it in hardware stores for ages, but a Google search could probably find it.

 

 

 

 

That's a great idea! Thanks for the post. You really have a vast knowledge and experience, I'm always picking up stuff from your posts!

 

 

Thanks!  Comes with age.  I'm 81, modeling continuously since I was 7.  Even modeled during college and afterwards in AF.  Was nice when we bought our first house- then I could build a real, permanent workshop.  That was in 1968.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    August 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Saturday, March 30, 2019 8:24 AM
I tried "real rust" by saving an old Brillo Pad ( essentially steel wool ) until it rusted into a powder and mixed it with Elmer's white glue. I wasn't happy with the results for it resembled brown paint when it dried on my tank mufflers.

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Saturday, March 30, 2019 10:06 AM

Years back we designed a big exterior installation of stainless steel wall panels on a building (Salk Institute) about a mile from the Pacific Ocean.

The spec. was for marine grade SST with a bead blast finish. After about 6 months, big rusted areas started to show on the panels.

It took a lot of research, but eventually the culprit was discovered. The steel alloy was right, the blast was done correctly, except the glass bead media used had been recycled from a previous application and it contained steel particles.

I tend to use weathering powders.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    November 2008
  • From: Central Florida
Posted by plasticjunkie on Saturday, March 30, 2019 4:01 PM

Jay try using rust Testors enamel in the small bottle and while still wet sprinkle rust pigments for the textured look. Fine tune with dry brushing darker or lighter rust paint shades.

 GIFMaker.org_jy_Ayj_O

 

 

Too many models to build, not enough time in a lifetime!!

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Western North Carolina
Posted by Tojo72 on Saturday, March 30, 2019 6:21 PM

For a textured look on exhausts,I stipple some Mr Surfacer 500 on them

  • Member since
    August 2013
Posted by Jay Jay on Sunday, March 31, 2019 7:13 AM

Thanks Ernie, I'll definately try that.

 

 

 

 

 

 I'm finally retired. Now time I got, money I don't.

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Monday, April 1, 2019 2:20 PM

I have homemade rust powder, but it's not made with vinegar.  I use steel wool scouring pads in the kitchen.  When they've lost their soap and start to rust, I stick 'em in a plastic cup with water, and just let them rust away naturally.  It takes longer than using vinegar, apparently, but I'm in no hurry.

I let the water evaporate naturally.  When the cup is dry, I can shake a batch of rust power out of it, and then add water again to rust away whatever is left.

I also have some other real rust, which one of the guys in my club brought it.  He worked in a machine shop, and after cleaning some milling machine or another, he collected a large coffee can full of powdered rust.  He brought it to one of our meetings, along with a box of plastic film canisters.  He told us to fill as many canisters as we liked.

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

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