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Don’t use rubber bands

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  • Member since
    August 2012
Don’t use rubber bands
Posted by JMorgan on Saturday, March 7, 2020 11:48 AM

When gluing, don't make the mistake I did. If going over seams, the glue will seep out and onto adjacent detail, effectively ruining the model completely. 

  • Member since
    March 2003
  • From: Towson MD
Posted by gregbale on Saturday, March 7, 2020 1:42 PM

It's an easy fix:

Tuck a toothpick, paintbrush handle or clipped section of sprue under the band, just enough to raise it away from the seam. Most times one will do, but some curves will require a segment on each side of the seam to clear it properly.

Or just wait to put the rubber band on after the adhesive has been applied.

Cheers

Greg

George Lewis:

"Every time you correct me on my grammar I love you a little fewer."
 
  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Sunday, March 8, 2020 6:57 AM

gregbale

It's an easy fix:

Tuck a toothpick, paintbrush handle or clipped section of sprue under the band, just enough to raise it away from the seam. Most times one will do, but some curves will require a segment on each side of the seam to clear it properly.

Or just wait to put the rubber band on after the adhesive has been applied.

Cheers

 

With liquid cement it will still leak for quite awhile after application of glue.  The toothpick tool does work.

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, March 8, 2020 9:18 AM

gregbale
Tuck a toothpick, paintbrush handle or clipped section of sprue under the band, just enough to raise it away from the seam. Most times one will do, but some curves will require a segment on each side of the seam to clear it properly.

Great tip, Greg. Yes

I screwed up my first seam with rubber bands as a kid, haven't used one since. But this idea should solve the problem.

Thanks.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Sunday, March 8, 2020 10:13 AM

JMorgan

When gluing, don't make the mistake I did. If going over seams, the glue will seep out and onto adjacent detail, effectively ruining the model completely. 

 

I’ve  used rubber bands on models for many many years. On the few occasions where liquid cement has seeped out and tracked out along the rubber bands, clean up was not difficult at all. Just a bit of extra sanding during seam clean up. No models were ever ruined. I find rubber bands to be much more effective than clamps in applying even pressure where needed.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

  • Member since
    May 2013
  • From: Indiana, USA
Posted by Greg on Sunday, March 8, 2020 10:45 AM

stikpusher
I find rubber bands to be much more effective than clamps in applying even pressure where needed.

Plus one to that. Though I have a lovely collection of miniature clamps, aside from the extremely rare modeling need of glueing two flat and parellet objects together, they are useless and a source of frustration.

I'm fired up to try the rubber band wedge trick.

-Greg

  • Member since
    July 2003
  • From: NEVER USE PHOTO BUCKET - IT'S A THREAD WRECKER.
Posted by disastermaster on Monday, March 9, 2020 11:15 AM

Don Stauffer

 gregbale

It's an easy fix:

Tuck a toothpick, paintbrush handle or clipped section of sprue under the band, just enough to raise it away from the seam. Most times one will do, but some curves will require a segment on each side of the seam to clear it properly.

Or just wait to put the rubber band on after the adhesive has been applied.

Cheers

With 4 round (round ones don't flex as much) toothpicks this works perfectly when installing the fuselage/cockpit sectioning of the 1/48 Hawker Typhoon MK 1B.

Didn't need a bit of putty.

  • Member since
    October 2019
  • From: New Braunfels, Texas
Posted by Tanker-Builder on Monday, March 9, 2020 12:08 PM

Hi;

 I have used Bands for years. The toothpicks I use though are the flat ones. That way I have more control on the tension. Look at a flat toothpick carefully from the side, it is wedge shaped!

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Wednesday, March 11, 2020 12:05 PM

JMorgan

When gluing, don't make the mistake I did. If going over seams, the glue will seep out and onto adjacent detail, effectively ruining the model completely. 

Yeah, it's happened to me, too.

But the advantage of applying uniform pressure with a rubber band far outweighs the occasional inconvenience of having to clean up where liquid glue may have leaked out and made contact with the band.  I'll...stick, with them (pun intended).

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    August 2014
  • From: Willamette Valley, Oregon
Posted by goldhammer on Wednesday, March 11, 2020 10:02 PM

Another way around is to leave a gap in your glue on either side of the band, move them when dry and wick glue in the gaps.

  • Member since
    November 2009
  • From: Twin Cities of Minnesota
Posted by Don Stauffer on Thursday, March 12, 2020 9:29 AM

Some hints on clamps.  I have four different types of clamps.  One type does not fill all clamping requirements.  I have a set of those cheap plastic spring clamps- they are fine for wing halves,  or relatively flat pieces that need to be sandwitched, but do not work on rounded surfaces well.  I also have two sizes of clothespins, regular wooden ones and miniature modelers versions, also wood (got them from Model Expo but seen them at several places.

For the real difficult clamping problems I love those plastic and metal six inch bar clamps.  They are micro-adjustible, so you can get the exact pressure you need.  The good ones I have are by Irwin, but Harbor Freight has okay ones frequently on sale for a buck each.  They frequently work on fuselage halves when none of the other kind will.  They have a trigger for tightening rather than turning a handle.  So you just adjust with the finger pressure you want.

 

 

Don Stauffer in Minnesota

  • Member since
    July 2014
  • From: Franklin Wi
Posted by Bakster on Thursday, March 12, 2020 9:37 AM

gregbale

It's an easy fix:

Tuck a toothpick, paintbrush handle or clipped section of sprue under the band, just enough to raise it away from the seam. Most times one will do, but some curves will require a segment on each side of the seam to clear it properly.

Or just wait to put the rubber band on after the adhesive has been applied.

Cheers

 

 

I had the same thing happen to me when using rubber bands. In my case it didn't ruin the model but it was a wake up call.

Good tip Greg. I have to remember that one.

  • Member since
    September 2012
Posted by GMorrison on Thursday, March 12, 2020 9:43 AM

goldhammer

Another way around is to leave a gap in your glue on either side of the band, move them when dry and wick glue in the gaps.

 

I agree there, and that is important for tape and to some degree clamps.

 Modeling is an excuse to buy books.

 

  • Member since
    September 2006
  • From: Bethlehem PA
Posted by the Baron on Friday, March 13, 2020 12:50 PM

goldhammer

Another way around is to leave a gap in your glue on either side of the band, move them when dry and wick glue in the gaps.

 
Yes

The bigger the government, the smaller the citizen.

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2004
  • From: Sonora Desert
Posted by stikpusher on Friday, March 13, 2020 1:32 PM

gregbale

Or just wait to put the rubber band on after the adhesive has been applied.

I know this sounds like basic advice, but why would you apply glue after the rubber bands? The capillary action in the seam to be glued will be reduced, and yes, the glue would naturally be forced to flow along things like the rubber bands... I am talking using liquid cements of course, but for those who use the thicker cements such as tube glue or the stuff with the needle barrels, those need to be applied before joining the parts.

 

F is for FIRE, That burns down the whole town!

U is for URANIUM... BOMBS!

N is for NO SURVIVORS...

       - Plankton

LSM

 

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